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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/17/2019 in all areas

  1. 7 points
    I have an update from Jimmy's daughter (October 19th). She said he is making great progress. He is eating solid food now and his trach is out. He is able to walk with the help of a walker. He is anxious to leave the hospital and go home but he still needs some rehab. They are hoping he can head to rehab next week!
  2. 3 points
    jump. as much as you can afford. be honest with the folks at the dz and you will gain experience by doing it. log them all and don't downsize too early. be safe.
  3. 2 points
    My husband has a Pilot 132; he likes it, but on no-wind days he's having to run more than he'd like (we're all getting older). He had a Stiletto 120 before that. But if you're currently jumping a 150 and considering you're getting older and jumping less, do you really want to downsize? Wendy P.
  4. 2 points
    Show up, ask at the front desk if there's anyone looking to jump with other newbies. It might be a newbie, and it might be an old fart who likes jumping with newbies. Slow days increase your chance of jumping with the same person twice is more likely, and doing that will really make it easier for you to figure out what you're doing, so that you can either do more or less of it. But slow days decrease your chance of having someone at all -- ask at the front desk if there are people whom you normally should be looking for. Be honest that you can't afford to pay for coaching right now. And if you can afford to stay at the end of the day, do so, listen, and feel free to contribute beer if it's needed. There's no guarantees, but it beats nothing. Wendy P. (old fart who likes jumping with newbies)
  5. 2 points
    I'm also an older jumper with shitty landings. I PLF a whole lot; that saves me from injury. I have no pride whatsoever . They're not getting better with age, but, well, my PLF's are still good. I've taken three or four canopy classes. I just don't care that much any more, because I walk back from all my landings. My default landing is a PLF, which I alter to a standup at the last minute if everything looks perfect. Your statement about ground hungry and two-stage landing makes me think that the ground looks the same coming at you (even at 45 degrees, etc) as it does to me. The faster the landing, the worse, for me. Every now and then I nail it, but I'm not sure that good landings will be in my skill set until I upsize to about a .7:1 BASE canopy or something like that. I currently have a Stiletto loaded at just over 1:1; I've also jumped a Pilot and liked it better; I might break down and get one if I get sick enough of the Stiletto. If you really liked the landings on a Sabre, can you maybe get one with a pocket slider? They're supposed to be magic. Have someone test it for you a couple of times. We're in the age range where a small pack is only useful because it weighs less walking to the airplane, and that's outweighed by a whole lot of other things. I'm in the same size range as you. I upsized my rig a couple of years ago, and bought a container that will allow at least two more upsizes. I'd rather be ungainly than broken. Wendy P.
  6. 2 points
    What kind of advice are you looking for? Lots of people use what's called a "packboy" or "power tool", which is a metal rod thin enough to go through the grommets with a length of CYPRES loop cord (or similar) that acts as the pull up cord. Personally, I use a standard pull up cord, which has changed since I started jumping from 'normal' binding tape to a softer fabric sort of material, usually printed with company logos. Last summer I found a thing called a PUCA tool (Pull Up Cord Assist). It's a handle that the pull up cord wraps around and gives a comfortable handle to grip. I find it a lot easier on my hands than wrapping the pull up cord around them Really old school is to use the gutted 550 cord, which is standard parachute cord with the center strings removed. Also old school is to use a shoe lace, but if you do that, make sure you remove the aglet. It is vulnerable to being stripped off and jamming the closing pin. The only advice I would offer is: 1 - Try before you buy. Most jumpers I know would be willing to let you use a power tool or PUCA tool, as long as you used it when they didn't need it. As noted above, the power tool rod is pretty thin. I'm not a big fan of them for that reason. 2 - Don't wear the power tool around your neck. The idea of wearing something around your throat that will kill you before it breaks is a really bad one. Lots of people do that, it's pretty stupid. Some wear them when jumping, which is really fucking stupid.
  7. 2 points
    Ground hungry... I wouldn't list the Spectra as being a particularly ground hungry canopy. There are certainly other canopies out there that are steeper trimmed. Keep in mind that any canopy that is designed to land easily and be forgiving on the flare will have to have an excess of flare authority. It has to be trimmed a little steeper to have the ability to increase it's CL to give you that powerful flare. If you were to fly a flatter canopy, one with a flatter glide, less ground hungry, you would find that the flare is some what less forgiving. I actually prefer flatter canopies and the way you generally land them is with a little extra speed. Even just a bit of front riser, so in a since you trim it more nose down, ground hungry, to get an easy landing out of it. One thing that was noticeable about the specter, is the way it pitches front to back. It was noticeable on landing as you descended in to the stiller air near the ground. When you passed through a wind shear between two layers. Think end of the day as the ground cools off and the ground winds die but the wind is still blowing a couple hundred feet up. Well there is a wind sheer as you drop from one layer to the next. Some of your airspeed goes away. Interestingly the larger the canopy is for you the more noticeable this is. 5 knts is a larger percentage of your air speed and when that head wind dies you are 5 knts slower. The canopy wants to correct that. It wants to speed up. It feels like it takes off surging forward and down toward the ground. Flaring dosen't seem to help because the canopy is pitching forwards and can not make lift to support you till it pitches back above your head. The larger the canopy and the longer the lines the more dramatic this can be. You see it with student canopies. They induce it all the time. If you make a small turn with a break, the canopy pitches back and then when you let up on the toggle the canopy surges forward. Not a lot but enough to ruin your flare. Worse is the student that flares high and then decides to let up because miss judged it. When he tries to flare again the canopy is well in front of his body. These are more dramatic examples but the same thing happens when you come in to land. If the wind drops off you get a surge in the canopy. Some canopies do this more then others. Line length is one factor but I think the airfoil also plays a part in it. It really depends on the pitch stiffness of the canopy. I don't understand all of it. But it's noticeable in the specter. You might try a Triathlon. They are not as prone to this. Back when these canopies came out they were neck and neck and we had jumpers that went back and forth between the canopies. It was the same market. They loved the specter but had noticeable more trouble landing them under some conditions that they had no problem landing their Tri in. I would not categorize a specter as a bad canopy you just need to learn to land it. Under those conditions I like to carry a little extra speed, front risers, or a small turn but hook a bit high. The idea being to to have a bit more speed when you enter that still air. You could also barrow a saber 2 from some one and give it a try. They also have a forgiving flare. Or go up a size. But with the specter I think it may just be a mater of learning to reconise the wind conditions. Or just use it as an excuse to hook that bitch down wind on the last load of the day. That way the wind sheer acts in your favor. Or at least that's my excuse and I'm sticking to it. Lee
  8. 2 points
    I'll add just this little bit. If everyone considering downsizing at 70 jumps had your thoughtfulness and wisdom we'd have a much safer sport.
  9. 1 point

    Time Left: 16 days and 11 hours

    • FOR SALE
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    Hey guys! Im selling an L&B Viso 2 and Optima 2 audible altimeters. There are less than 100 jumps on them. The Viso comes with 3 different wrist mounts. 1) Velcro with finger band 2) Wrist band 3) Wrist band with slots for both the Viso and a GoPro remote The Optima Audible altimeter mounts inside most every skydiving helmet. Includes 2 installation/packing tools and owners manual for the Viso Skydiving Altimeters. Condition is Used. Shipped with USPS First Class Package. Thanks you guys!

    $350.00

    Del Mar, California - US

  10. 1 point
    Parrothead Vol, Thanks for the post. Right after this happened I emailed Marla and asked her if they told her the last suspect was LD. She confirmed the FBI had told her that. (I also asked her what specifically about LD caught the FBI's attention and she didn't know). I feel like we've gone around and around this already. Robert has his own opinions and he's entitled to have them. I don't think you're going to change his mind no matter what you post.
  11. 1 point
    I believe Marla's mother has passed away. I think Marla had some memories and tried to fill in the missing details, many of them quite implausible. I think Tom Fuentes said in the history channel documentary, If someone says A and B, and they make sense, and then they say C and C sounds nuts, does that mean A & B aren't true? The FBI didn't shut down the case until after they finished one last fingerprint test on LD Cooper, so there was some part of her story the FBI found plausible. I don't know what that is, and I don't think Marla even knows exactly what that is.
  12. 1 point
    Presuming you meet the requirements to take the course, my understanding is that fall rate range (ability to fall faster or slower) and ability to fly very close to others are at or near the top of the list. Disclaimer: Not an instructor, but I've observed AFFI courses a number of times, and had some fun discussions with the instructor candidates.
  13. 1 point
    A bungee won't keep you from falling out of the harness backwards. Your own muscles will do that (and any rig that fits well enough for you to deploy a canopy safely in will fit well enough for you to stay in it with your leg straps scooched forward a bit under canopy). BUT... if you want a bungee on your rig, it's a really easy thing for a rigger with a decent sewing machine to add, for probably well under $20.
  14. 1 point
    https://www.facebook.com/ParachuteLabs/
  15. 1 point
    Lee, I really appreciate the analysis. I was thinking about a Triathlon but wanted softer openings. Somebody told me that Tri's with the 5.0 mod open better. Is that true? Again, thanks for the info...and I will take all of this into consideration before switching canopies. Cheers!
  16. 1 point
    She's a really cool gal. I agree, I'd love to have beers with her. Thanks for listening to the show.
  17. 1 point
    Is Parachute Systems still in business?
  18. 1 point
    If you want to try Florida, recommend either Skydive Deland or Skydive City in Zephyrhills. Both have very robust AFF programs with a number of options. Both have fun jumper groups on Facebook that often post rooms, apartments, houses for rent for reasonable prices. They both fly seven days a week in the winter, so you could jump as much as you want. Both dropzones host many international jumpers over the winter, so you would be able to meet with a very diverse group while there. You would probably even be able to find others there who speak Canadian. And yes, Zephyrhills is the home of water, so you would also have that going for you. Good luck wherever you opt to learn. Have fun, and remember, a good arch cures a lot of problems.
  19. 1 point
    Jimmy was one of my JMs in my student days, back in 1975. He helped me learn about the wonders of freefall. We've been fast friends ever since, give or take a couple decades. I will even put him on our prayer list at (Episcopal) church tomorrow. I know Jimmy will be doing all he can to fight his way back. Much love to all.
  20. 1 point
    I participate in FB because there is a lot of action there. But it is far inferior to what is available right here. FB content is like a vapour.
  21. 1 point
    I don't know how I missed this gem! I totally think you should kick out those fake weekend instructors like myself. Then you will have to hire more full time instructors to handle the weekend capacity, and you will have to share more of your weekday jumps. The math will totally work out in your favor, trust me I am certified public accountant who pretends to be a skydiving instructor on the weekends. I will get to fun jump more, so screw it, and I don't really care if you have to switch from Dinty Moore stew to Alpo because you suck at math.
  22. 1 point
    It’s been weeks now without your weekly calls to pester me about airport access, or fill me in on the on going issues of concern or cool stuff people are doing. I’ll miss our long banter of arguing about all things skydiving. Those cds you gave me of your music tracks that you made take on a whole appreciation of your talents. As with all my old timer friends who fill the slots on the other side, you take with you a vast knowledge, much of it not written in books but stored in your lifetime of working in this sport and it’s now lost forever, but for those who truly listened to your teachings. Thank you for all the support you gave to me personally and professionally in airport access. Blue skies my friend, rest in peace you will be missed by many!
  23. 1 point
    You had 3 chops on a 169 Pilot 7 and an ATC? Yeah I’m not so sure I’ll be listening to your canopy advice lmao
  24. 1 point
    You must be one of those losers who have spent your life playing this game and now you think you are a "professional". I have news for you. Skydiving is not has never been a profession. Especially tandem skydiving which does not even require much skill. Get off your high horse.
  25. 1 point
    open file with windows photos ( yes sound crazy to open video with photo app but works ) top right choose edit choose which section you want save as done :-)
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