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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/27/2019 in Posts

  1. 8 points
    Hello To ALL..... Just checked in here, to find this thread.....Thanks to Each of your for your posts and good wishes......The worst Is now Over. I was discharged on Oct 20th.. " They turnt me Loose " " said I was Well " …. And I AM.... I had gone to Skydive The Falls on Saturday September 14th and after a bit of a wind hold it calmed down and they started sending up loads. I enjoyed a Nice 2 way from 12 grand with a long time buddy....The view of Niagara Falls during the climb to altitude was Fantastic . While Packing my rig afterwards, I found it to Be, a bit of an effort.. and I had to stop 3 times and sit to rest...… Hmmmm. Got home that night and was just feeling wrung out... No real pain, no numbness, but I felt lousy..It was around 10 or 11 pm and Nancy had already gone to sleep. I saw NO value in waking her and having her SIT in an E R waiting room, wondering and Waiting,,,, so I wrote her a note , left it where she could Easily Find it. and said " I am going to the hospital " Got there in a few minutes because it is only a couple of miles away. It was NOT busy and they took me in quickly. They did an EKG on me. and the next thing I knew they were calling for an anesthesiologist AND a surgeon !! Yikes !!!! Well they did a big time bypass on me , had me on a heart pump and a respirator throughout... I was out of it for a few days... and feel terrible about putting my FAmily through those first few days, post Op... I got great care from the doctors and nurses and a few in particular were top shelf, in their encouragement and insistance that I "get UP and get Moving"... I was walking around and improving each day, by about 2 weeks post op and little by little they removed the trach... and the drainage apparatus and the nasal feeding tube and got me back onto swallowing and a bit of a sense of normalcy... I have been Home now for 10 days or so, and I am pain free and no longer need the walker I had been using. Kind of glad we are coming into the end of the year as I am on a hiatus from work and will be doing Physical therapy and building up my appetite the next few weeks. I lost 22 pounds and was Under 170, for the first time since high school..... Anyway things are improving. I am proud that I Did NOT ignore my sense of malaise and instead sought medical care...... I was told I was getting close to a cardiac arrest..... Follow your instincts my Friends No One is bulletproof and certain issues CAN sneak Up on us... I feel blessed that in addition to Great Friends and Family, I also have a Guardian Angel or Two... sitting on my shoulders... Thanks skymama,,, for initiating this thread. I am glad that I checked in here,,, to Find it.... skydive often, skydive safely, skydive with friends . jimmytavino uspa # 9452 A3914 D12122
  2. 7 points
    I have an update from Jimmy's daughter (October 19th). She said he is making great progress. He is eating solid food now and his trach is out. He is able to walk with the help of a walker. He is anxious to leave the hospital and go home but he still needs some rehab. They are hoping he can head to rehab next week!
  3. 5 points
  4. 4 points
    I did not want to be limited to just one hand when I was trying to get out of the situation alive...
  5. 4 points
    Yup. Hey lady, not unlike you; I'm getting a little long in the tooth. Couple of major surgeries and a back and knees that has just crumbled into pieces from years of military jumping. Many of us dinosaurs contributed countless articles on safety, training, etc. to this site in its infancy to help the young'uns. Not unlike you, I don't tread in the skydiving community too often anymore and when I do it's relevant no matter what the timeframe. EP's target fixation, etc. I think the information given here would be more focused from dinosaurs who've been there, done that - than what they'll get from the land of facebook. Respect, Keith
  6. 4 points
    Some people don't finish AFF. Some people never get their license. Some people get their license and drift away soon after. Some people jump for a year or two and then disappear. Some do it until they decide to become 'responsible' and quit. That may be their own decision or they may have 'help' with it. Some jump until they realize how much time & money it takes to stay current and reasonably safe, or to progress beyond 'sorta good'. Some jump until they get hurt, or see someone they know get hurt or killed. The danger isn't 'real' until then. So they quit. Some become Tandem Instructors (or packers or even DZOs), then get burned out by the grind. Of course, some of us keep on despite all of the above and refuse to quit.
  7. 4 points
    Lawyers have a high rate of misery compared to other professions. A 2-second google search revealed that attorneys have the 11th highest suicide rate by occupation. I'm sad that people immediately piled on the OP. I suspect skydiving has saved a LOT of people from depression, and I think there is HUGE value in people sharing openly about their struggles with mental health. That's undermined when people are jerks to each other when they could just as easily say nothing.
  8. 4 points
    FB is for announcements; it sucks for discussions. Wendy P.
  9. 3 points
    HIPPI CHONKER ADVARNING Oof. This is a big topic. Hits me right in the chonkeratøs. When I was in my 30's I decided to tell the "fuck offs" to a well paid and "highly respectable" career path, went back to college, sold my city apartment and moved my shit back to my parents house. Wish there was some kind of training on this. There isn't. You want advice on how to determine the future. You can't have it. You won't know. You might do 100's more. You might do 1000's. Who cares. Just exit the fucking plane. Do what you enjoy. Feel it. Appreciate the sensation, the people you meet, the places you visit, and those you connect with. Tell them. Accept what you cannot control but take charge of what you can. And if you ever get caught up in a waterboarding situation, good luck with that.
  10. 3 points
    A "little" late, but I wanted to provide some insights for everyone, to learn / improve nonetheless. The mentioned hesitation did not leat to a fatality, I am still alive and came out of it with just some bruises... After opening I recognized a flip-through malfunction, which was caused by myself due to packing directly on a field after an outside landing the jump before. In hindsight, I could have most likely landed it without issues, but in that moment decided otherwise as the canopy above me was not "good". As practised, I grabbed both handles with one hand. I pulled my right hand until full arm extension and tried to pull my reserve handle after that but I was unable to pull the handle at all, it did not move even a little. I turned my head to the left and saw my main still attached by something and my reserve pilot chute being out. My first thought was, that it might be that I did not pull the cutaway cable all the way, so I cleared the cutaway cable from the housing completely. But I was still hanging from my main by something I could not identify in that moment. I instinctively grabbed that thing from what I was hanging, tried to pull up and just before I wanted to pull on my reserve bridle to get my reserve out, the hangup cleared. I saw and recognized that I was no longer attached to my main but due to my body orientation and possibly low speed, my reserve could not be extracted. I turned back to my belly and waited for the reserve to come out, which it thankfully did after a moment. Basically my reserve cable and pin was not able to pass the RSL ring to which the extension cord was attached. It looks like the edge of the pin got stuck at the back of the knot of the extension cord and due to the tension locked there. So I was still connected to my main by my reserve cable and RSL. I just grabbed whatever I was hanging from and thankfully the pin cleared the ring possibly due to me grabbing the pin or releasing some tension. Trying to find the root-cause for this incident myself, I also tried misrouting the reserve-cable through the knot, but this does not happen easily. You have to put way more effort in misrouting it, than in doing it the right way. In the end, Sunrise Manufacturing issued this service bulletin for it.
  11. 3 points
    Less youtube. More actual jumping or tunnelling.
  12. 3 points
    The best way to keep things fresh is trying to learn a new skill every year. I only made 4 static-line jumps my first year. Over that winter I earned a private pilot license. The next summer I flew a bit and only made two jumps. The third summer I made 60 jumps and earned my A license. The fourth summer, I did about 50 fun jumps. The fifth year, I passed the army static-line course and tried out for the Canadian Army parachute display team. The sixth year, I earned a static-line jump-master rating. The seventh year, I did another 50 fun jumps, plus a stack of exhibition jumps. The eighth year, I earned a rigger rating and started flying jumpers. The ninth year, I flew more jumpers and learned how to drop IAD students (1985). The tenth year, I earned an Instructor B rating and tandem instructor rating and did a couple of BASE jumps. I did not jump much while at university, but worked full-time in the skydiving industry for 18 years afterwards. Every year I tried to add a new rating or renew an old rating: Master Rigger, PFF instructor, Cypres installation rating, PIA Symposia, lecturing at PIA Symposia, wing-suit, Rigger Instructor, Rigger Examiner, Tandem Examiner Rating, etc. Eventually, I had to take a year off for knee surgery and cut back to only doing tandems on weekends. I finally quit jumping after the local CSPA DZ shut down and I disagreed with a non-CSPA DZO about seat-belts. If you try to learn something new every year, you will never get bored skydiving.
  13. 3 points
    I am always surprised how fast time goes by when one is having fun lol.. I didn’t mean to go this long without an update, so I will bring everyone up to speed. My team and I have been focused on the military AADs (Static Line and Manned Free Fall) fine tuning the hardware and firing algorithms, and I am pleased with how each AAD is turning out. I am trying to be mindful of the workload, as I do not want to burn my team out, so the evolvement has been slower but steady. Now that my confidence in the military AADs is high, I will be turning my attention to the Sport AAD hardware and firing algorithms. It was my initial intention that the military and sport hardware would be the same, but the features that the military is asking for require hardware and software that is not of value to the sport market, and in an effort to keep the cost of the sport AAD down and reduce power consumption, dedicated sport AAD hardware is needed. Fortunately, the changes are mostly elimination of components, such as the BLE, and changing out the 32MB Micro SD-card with smaller but less power hunger onboard memory, so the revision design effort will not be bad. It just takes time to make the changes and have them reviewed, update based on the results of the review, resubmit for design review, yada yada.. Very important process, but can take some time. I also have been making some changes to little things from a “fit and finish/feel/perception” perspective. So far the changes have increased quality feel and performance while reducing the cost. Details are important to me and I am glad we are taking our time to get it right. After taking with many jumpers of varying backgrounds, it is very apparent that the skydiving industry is not ready to embrace some of the things that I wanted to carry over from the automotive industry, mainly the remote monitoring of the AAD self test results. Infrastructure challenges aside, jumpers are just not ready for that, so I am shelving that feature for the sport AAD. One positive side to doing that is I can eliminate the BLE circuitry and code; however there will still be a Micro USB connector in the interface. As if all that is not enough, I am also looking at different business models in an effort to identify which ones make the most business sense as we come closer to going to market. There are a lot of moving parts and the right strategic partner can increase the success dramatically. I keep telling myself “if this was easy everyone would be doing it” lol..
  14. 3 points
    I have no idea how this got so complicated. I'd just do it. There are some basic rules like don't use a slider with grommets significantly wider then your cell. Depending on the length of your stabilizers your slider should not be setting on your bottom skin when packing. If it's so much wider that it's just crumpled on the bottom skin the fabric will not be holding the grommets up the lines till they slide low enough to lift the fabric off the bottom skin. Only then will the wind be holding it up. That's a fairly extreme limit but I have seen people make that mistake. Don't people futz with there gear any more? Lee
  15. 3 points
    Well please hurry and put the correct manual on the website. As a rigger I can assure you my customers never supply me with the manual that came with their product. I always have to find the manual on my own.
  16. 3 points
    Show up, ask at the front desk if there's anyone looking to jump with other newbies. It might be a newbie, and it might be an old fart who likes jumping with newbies. Slow days increase your chance of jumping with the same person twice is more likely, and doing that will really make it easier for you to figure out what you're doing, so that you can either do more or less of it. But slow days decrease your chance of having someone at all -- ask at the front desk if there are people whom you normally should be looking for. Be honest that you can't afford to pay for coaching right now. And if you can afford to stay at the end of the day, do so, listen, and feel free to contribute beer if it's needed. There's no guarantees, but it beats nothing. Wendy P. (old fart who likes jumping with newbies)
  17. 3 points
    jump. as much as you can afford. be honest with the folks at the dz and you will gain experience by doing it. log them all and don't downsize too early. be safe.
  18. 3 points
  19. 3 points
    I've temporarily locked this thread. Many of you guys have shown exactly why this thread was initially locked. This forum is a place for the discussion of the DB Cooper case, not the discussion of members who own Cooper websites. Back and forths between users on personal matters not directly relating to the case offers no insight for anyone. I also want to use this time to remind you guys that there is an ignore feature which should be used. It can hide both posts and private messages from users whom you wish not to be bothered by. This thread will be reopened in 24 hours, with a much less liberal approach. Since you guys (as a whole) are unable to govern yourselves, you're forcing us to play adult and do it for you.
  20. 3 points
    Jimmy was one of my JMs in my student days, back in 1975. He helped me learn about the wonders of freefall. We've been fast friends ever since, give or take a couple decades. I will even put him on our prayer list at (Episcopal) church tomorrow. I know Jimmy will be doing all he can to fight his way back. Much love to all.
  21. 3 points
    LOve You JimMy get home soon your grand kids need you and your garden needs weeding
  22. 2 points
    Hey gang...in case you haven't heard, Jimmy Tavino needed emergency open heart surgery on September 15th, and had five stints put in. He's been in the ICU at Rochester General Hospital in Rochester, NY ever since. They are hoping he can move to a regular room soon. As of now, he's still on a heart and lung machine. So, please do whatever you do to send out good juju to the universe to help him heal. If you know Jimmy, you know that he would be the first one to do it for you! He's one heck of a guy. If you have anything to say to him that you want him to read when he gets out, go ahead and post to this thread. I'll start... Him. Him...fuck him! (I hope you've been in the sport long enough to know that's an endearing comment to make to a skydiver!)
  23. 2 points
    Many people dont last 5 years, Very few last 10 years. On this site you'll find people who have been doing it a long time (18th year for me) but we are not the majority.
  24. 2 points
    I made my first jump in 1980. still not sure if I like, so I better keep trying.
  25. 2 points
    blake from velocity got back to me and said it took the national 357 magnum pilot chute and could get me a free bag when i get him the measurements. i called paraphernalia and they have the pilot chute in stock. the only reason i started looking was that my rigger looked up an old manual and told me about the jellyfish pilot chute and that it was unreliable. turns out that i can get this back in the air for about $350. thanx for the info.
  26. 2 points
    I haven’t jumped in 7 years. Doing a recurrency jump tomorrow. Wish me luck and some blue skies!
  27. 2 points
    Man, you're a sour little bitch. Take a break buddy..smile a little.
  28. 2 points
    Oh, Ken, you do huggable so good!
  29. 2 points
    Sometimes new jumpers get to be overcome with the excitement of their new sport. Sometimes they need to express themselves here as keyboard warriors. You have now stepped into the territory of someone who really needs to lurk more and post less. You aren’t the first and you won’t be the last.
  30. 2 points
    Betty's face was one of the kind faces I always looked forward to seeing at Lake Wales when I went through my student progression there in the early 2000's...She will indeed be missed.
  31. 2 points
    More $ than that if I have to untangle lines because the canopy was shipped without links.
  32. 2 points
    Dude. You've done A tandem. He's done 5000 not tandem jumps. He's been jumping much longer than you have been alive. Because someone's profile on dropzone doesn't say instructor doesn't mean they have never been one. You might consider doing an actual skydive before telling very experienced jumpers to shut up.
  33. 2 points
    Being current is everything in skydiving. Especially when you are a student. If you can not afford to do your AFF program in less than one or two months at the most then I would strongly encourage you to save up until you can.
  34. 2 points
    No video recording for 2019 but the 2018 talk is here:
  35. 2 points
    "the crew told him that they could see the lights of Portland and other distinctive lights in that area"
  36. 2 points
    Madigan... I'm over 50... and one of the things that makes me most nervous is listening to someone tell me how they have it all figured out. Do you know what you can teach someone who's got it all figured out...? Not a damn thing. Where as someone who is teachable, never has to stop learning. If I thought there was a trick to all this, I'd say the trick was to learn to love learning. I had to put booze down about the time I was 24. It was a problem for me. At 24, I wasn't a grownup and I wasn't a man. Not by any definition of those terms that I was able to articulate. I'm past that now and that particular story is perhaps long and boring to anyone not in a similar situation. The point of THAT... is I believe I was exactly where I was supposed to be. I believe that today. I also believe that I'm gonna be fine. As long as I remember a few things. What those things are might vary a little from person to person. What they are for you, I don't wanna speculate, since we don't know each other. But I don't think you can't go too far wrong if you start with these 3 things; 1-try to remain teachable. If you have an interest in skydiving, I'd say that's a good start. Not because skydiving is great... tho I think it's pretty great myself and I'm pretty new to it. But because I THINK there's a LOT to learn about it. 2- find the willingness to ask questions. There is nothing wrong with the answer "I don't know", and it's not a bad way to find out what you don't know. 3- happiness is an inside job. If I can't find a way to be happy on my own, no person and no thing is gonna do the job either. Last thing I'd like to say. I'm not sure about other families, but in my family I'd guess that what they find irreplaceable about me isn't any THING I'm outstanding at... except for maybe being me. No one else could do it nearly as well. Blue skies sir. Hope to meet you up there sometime.
  37. 2 points
    Love it. Years of both Harley & skydiving shit would go in mine. The "Last Load Lounge" would HAVE to have the requisite cable spool table for ambience. My only question is - Where ya gonna put the stripper pole?
  38. 2 points
    For judges, grips are much less visible when using suits with grippers. Especially with figures where on flyer is on the back, and the other on the belly, the actual dock tends to be occluded by the gripper. In our experience, the added 5 to 10 seconds freefall a bigger suit gets in comparison to Havok-sized suits, is not worth the almost 50% working speed in docks/maneuvers you when compared to small/mid sized suits. Tight fit, and clean lines are important on acro suits. Loose fit around hips/arms tends to result in more sloppy flying, especially when it comes to lateral motion. Regardless of brand, make sure you get a suit with a good tailor-made fit. Havok/Magister is the combo our team flies (weight related difference, dress for succes)
  39. 2 points
    Steve Kalvelage is presented with a statue by Dick Nazarro recognizing his selection as the 1980 Soldier of the Year for A/1/11th Special Forces Group, Fort Devens, Massachusetts"
  40. 2 points
    I've always carried mine on because I'm afraid of what could happen if TSA has unsupervised access to my handles. I have a rig sleeve, usually remove my hook knife but forgot last time I flew (about a month ago) and made it through both Denver and San Diego without any issues. About 6 years ago at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway a TSA agent attempted to lift my old rig by the metal reserve ripcord as it came out of the scanner. The reserve pilot chute hit the floor but the free bag didnt move and I was able to carry it on in a trash bag. Thankfully i was heading home from Eloy or that really could have been a trip spoiler. The agent apologized and the supervisor had me fill out a form that got me a check to pay for a repack. I have a Curv now with pillows and the rig sleeve has velcro stretch covers that wrap around the cutaway and reserve handles.
  41. 2 points
    Seriously. People who work full time jobs and spend their weekends instructing (and even making instructors like someone I know well) have NO right to steal from those who choose to "live the dream". Doesn't matter how much experience the part timer has (although I guess it's worse if they have more than the OP). Those non-"professionals" should go back to their real life jobs and leave the skydiving... or do I mean ride operating? - to those who have dedicated their lives to it. </sarcasm>
  42. 2 points
    Spoken as the true Airtec lover and defender you have always been here. Two points. Airtec no longer requires, only recommends 5 year servicing on the new units. Which means that almost no one will bother, making one of your points moot. And the other thing is that the demand for used AADs far exceeds the supply. This makes buying a new one the cheapest option on a per year cost basis.
  43. 2 points
    Spoke with them this week and they are in process of transitioning to new factory and hence not taking new orders. They are making new parts and dealers have contact details of Chris. They are definitely still in business and just transitioning at the moment.
  44. 2 points
    Hi everyone, Firebird is an US owned and based company since 2017. We are headquartered in Eloy and many of the people here and around the US jump our RUSH or other products with positive feedbacks. We can name Steve & Sara Curtis, Jason Peters, Sean MacCormac, Andy Malchiodi, Kim Winslow as satisfied users. The RUSH has a TSO c23D and has no service life limit. Same for other Firebird products We did realize that the old version was still on our website and the new manual will be uploaded shortly. We apologize for that mistake as we are working on a new website. Every product comes with the new manual on an USB stick, so that actual customers have the latest version. usa@flyfirebird.com
  45. 2 points
    I guess that depends on the motivation of the coach/instructor. My husband is a USPA AFF IE and coach examiner and a Master Rigger with a shit ton of experience. He is happy to talk with, advise, pass on useful information to anyone... for nothing. A beer is a nice offering but not required. He doesn't need to be paid to share what he knows with others. It's not about his pocketbook, it's about helping people become better, safer and more knowledgeable skydivers. Not to mention that it makes newbies feel like they are a part of the dz and not a wallet to empty. I know I'm a dinosaur, but I think It's pretty sad that jumpers now expect to be paid to talk to newbies.
  46. 2 points
    Damn dude, do you kick skydiving coaches in the balls when you see them in person too? The cheapest and fastest way to get good at any discipline is to get coaching. It feels more expensive at the start, but it's not. In the long run you'll get where you're trying to go in far fewer jumps and having spent less money. The same is true for tunnel time. Your strategy of, "wait until a coach isn't working and then try to leech some information/coaching/jumps out of them in exchange for a $5 beer" is insulting...at best. At worst...it's damn near theft. A lot of good people make a living by helping other skydivers become better. I'm sure they don't appreciate you telling people that their services aren't valuable, and that the best course of action is to try and undermine their livelihood. Coaches are valuable, and important, and worth it. Their services are valuable, and should be respected as such. Jumping with an LO is NOT the same as working one-on-one with a dedicated coach.
  47. 2 points
    I'm also an older jumper with shitty landings. I PLF a whole lot; that saves me from injury. I have no pride whatsoever . They're not getting better with age, but, well, my PLF's are still good. I've taken three or four canopy classes. I just don't care that much any more, because I walk back from all my landings. My default landing is a PLF, which I alter to a standup at the last minute if everything looks perfect. Your statement about ground hungry and two-stage landing makes me think that the ground looks the same coming at you (even at 45 degrees, etc) as it does to me. The faster the landing, the worse, for me. Every now and then I nail it, but I'm not sure that good landings will be in my skill set until I upsize to about a .7:1 BASE canopy or something like that. I currently have a Stiletto loaded at just over 1:1; I've also jumped a Pilot and liked it better; I might break down and get one if I get sick enough of the Stiletto. If you really liked the landings on a Sabre, can you maybe get one with a pocket slider? They're supposed to be magic. Have someone test it for you a couple of times. We're in the age range where a small pack is only useful because it weighs less walking to the airplane, and that's outweighed by a whole lot of other things. I'm in the same size range as you. I upsized my rig a couple of years ago, and bought a container that will allow at least two more upsizes. I'd rather be ungainly than broken. Wendy P.
  48. 2 points
    This has been discussed on here before, so if you can find the other thread you'll see more suggestions. But yeah, know what the experience requirements are for your country and how well you meet those. Also, a question is what kind of flying do you normally do, belly or freeflying? Freeflying skills can certainly help in some instances, but it's primarily a belly flying game. Especially if you're normally a freeflyer, this is what I'd suggest: All of the above, plus - It's been said by a lot of old-schoolers, myself included, that a great training ground for AFF is 4-way. Find 3 like-minded people and start a 4-way team. Doesn't matter about actually competing, just practice that discipline of skydiving. You'll get current/proficient at linked exits, piece flying, close-proximity slot flying, and other belly skills that you'll use in AFF, and do so in a relaxed, fun manner that doesn't feel like you're burning a lot of money and jumps on 'training'. Then, when you're closer to taking the course, get coaching in AFF specific skills like botched exits, spin stops, rollovers and what-not. You can do some of that in the tunnel, but the tunnel negates the reality that you sometimes have to chase unruly students across the sky or through fall-rate variations. Good luck.
  49. 2 points
    I don't think ZoeJD's post really was advertising, more like a product announcement, so calling that out was unnecessary. Having said that, I don't think what Lisa said was actually negative. ZoeJD, if you read this, this site could use a little spicing up, so I for one hope you don't run off.
  50. 2 points
    Found an old Pennys ad.. Towncraft Snapper ties $1.50 and ASSORTED TIE TACK and CUFF LINK SETS $5.00...