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  1. 9 points
    There are 2 speeds: Indicated airspeed and true airspeed. The speed that the jumper will feel in freefall is always indicated airspeed and for a jumper that falls at an indicated airspeed of 120 mph, he will fall at that same indicated airspeed regardless of altitude (except when going so high there is no air at all). If you could take an airspeed indicator with you in freefall, it would always register the same airspeed, indicated airspeed, regardless of altitude for a give body position. Your true airspeed will change with altitude and at 41,000' your true airspeed, with an indicated airspeed of 120 mph, would be about (depending on temperature) 245 mph. However, your body would only feel the indicated airspeed of 120 mph. Mike Mullins Oh yes I will. Mike
  2. 9 points
    "When a coup attempt goes unpunished, it has officially become a training exercise." - Author Unknown
  3. 8 points
    I disagree with just about all of Rep. Cheney's policy positions, but to punish her for not promoting a huge lie is about as low as you can go.
  4. 8 points
    In my church there is controversy about taking the vaccine. Many have taken it, including my wife and I, but some refuse. Those refusing are not vocal with their reasoning. It comes across as, mostly, the government is not going to tell me what to do. To me that is very weak and not very enlightening. Some of us have had the virus and some of those have died or still suffering long term effects. My wife is in this situation. To date we have had 8,254 infected and 214 deaths. I would guess around 50% of the seniors are vaccinated. Getting an appointment is a stumbling block. Personally, I think it is better to be as safe as possible than to be as sick as possible.
  5. 8 points
    So do actions. There was a time (it seems long ago) when elections were bitterly contested, but when the survivors made it to Congress they would roll up their sleeves and try to get some work done, and this meant working across the aisle. Hard though it may be to believe, Republicans and Democrats often socialized together and even had some pretty solid friendships. For some time now though, Republicans have adopted a scorched-earth strategy of total obstructionism when they are the minority, and ram-it-up-your-ass policy making when they are in the majority. This policy has been carried to the ultimate extreme by McConnell, who has pretty much destroyed the Senate as a deliberative body. Once upon a time the Senate required 60 votes to confirm Cabinet appointments and senior judgeship's including the Supreme Court. In Obama's first term McConnell was minority leader but still pushed the Republicans in the Senate to block several of Obama's nominees for his Cabinet, and also many nominees the judiciary. He was not coy about using the filibuster to try to castrate the Obama administration, so that Obama could not seat a full cabinet or fill judicial appointments in a timely manner. This forced the majority leader, Harry Reid, into a Hobson's choice. A Hobson's choice is where you have to make a choice but you only have one option. He eliminated the filibuster (the 60% rule) for most positions that required Congressional approval, but he did not eliminate it for Supreme Court appointments, arguing that such an important appointment should require more than a bare 51 votes to confirm. Leaving the Supreme Court at 60 votes meant any nominee would need to attract at least a few votes from the minority party, so they could not be too extreme. The problem with the Democrat's approach is that they still assumed some measure of good faith on the part of the Republicans. Instead, when the Republicans gained control of the Senate, McConnell blocked almost all of Obama's judicial nominees, creating a huge backlog of empty positions and also a huge backlog of cases waiting to be heard, and ultimately of course he blocked Obama's nominee for a Supreme Court seat. Then when Trump nominated Gorsuch, McConnell eliminated the 60 vote rule for the Supreme Court so he could ram through Gorsuch, Kavanaugh, and now Barrett with not one Democratic vote. What I meant by "actions have consequences" is that McConnell's legacy will be a Congress in which Democrats will have learned the lesson to never allow the Republicans one inch, because if you do they will fuck you. The Senate is dead as "the world's greatest deliberative body". It will for a long time be focused far more on screwing over the other side than on doing any actual bipartisan legislation. Good job, Mitch. I have voted for Republicans in the past, when I thought they were the best candidate. Not for president it is true, but I would not have been too alarmed if McCain or Romney had won as I was confident they actually had the best intentions for the country. No longer. The Republican "party" has shown itself to be interested only in cementing their own power in place, establishing one party rule, and prostrating themselves before Trump and their corporate masters. Even if I think a particular individual is OK the party is so corrupt I can never again consider a Republican for any level of government.
  6. 7 points
    My people (military intel types) made a mistake. Then this military leadership owned it when it was discovered and this administration is trying to make amends. When US forces were targeted in this and other countries over the previous four years, what was the plan? Oh yeah: "bomb the shit out of them." There was a lot of criticism for the administration "allowing" the attack on the airport checkpoint, and quite a lot of insistence that it not happen again during the evacuation. Information was gathered, and we made a bad call over the interpretation of it. How much criticism would be flowing had no action been taken and another attack had happened? Hindsight is 20/20. We recognize it was a bad interpretation of the available information. But we admit it and try to recover.
  7. 7 points
    So, you joined 4 hours ago to bash Icon? Welcome to the forums and thanks for your valuable insight. Perhaps you shouldn't buy any rig - they've all had reserve issues. Skydiving is not for everyone.
  8. 7 points
    I do indeed. Your sources for what CRT is are about as authoritative as that whuffo's ideas of what skydiving was from years gone by. Yep. No wonder you believe the right wing strawman version of what CRT is. I am only surprised you did not include George Carlin, Andrew Dice Clay and Bobcat GoldThwait as sources for your understanding. Nope. But race played a role. Attempts to understand what role it played are worthwhile, and are not Monty Python-esque, or Marxist, or racist. I do indeed support it, and I am just fine with you thinking I am a humorless twit. Due to my work in it, I have realized a few things. I used to think I understood transgender people. Then one of the women who works for me came out to me as trans. She did this because of my support for DEI, and it was a good thing - I could be a better manager if I understood her perspective a bit better. From her I learned that I was not "woke." I did not understand what trans people go through, nor do I understand now, since I am a straight cis guy. But at least I understand the issue a little better now. I used to think that rape was a rare crime, and that it was something that happened when women got careless. Then an old friend told me about her rape. It shook me a bit. When I talked to another friend about it, she told me about HER rape. Now half the women I have talked to have their own stories about it - including women who are tough as nails, and are about as far from a careless pushover as you can get. I used to think that blacks (and other minorities) had had it bad centuries ago, but nowadays all those laws had been changed, so now it was 100% up to them. Then in high school I got to know the Indian kid next to me in band. He was one of four non-Christians allowed entry. I also got to know one of the four black kids in the school, and we're still friends on Facebook. I did a little digging, and found out that if my high school admitted a certain percentage of non-Christian and non-white students, they qualified for a federal financial assistance program. (One of those 'structural' things that you think is a joke.) I don't really understand what it's like to be a minority, but after talking to them I at least understand it a little bit more. From your posts it sounds like you believe you know it all, and are smugly confident that you have nothing left to learn on the topic. Black scholars who research the structural basis of racism are Marxists, and their work is comedy. Trans people are mentally ill. Muslims are violent, insane criminals. Black people who talk about racism are the real racists. If that lets you sleep better at night, then I guess that . . . works for you. Rest assured that I do not have the vast, superior and unquestionable understanding that you do. The more work I do on understanding the issues under DEI (and for me it does take work) the more I understand how much I have to learn. If that means I am a humorless twit in your eyes, so be it. Feel free to, in the future, disregard my posts, and converse only with people at your (much higher) level.
  9. 7 points
    OK. Bill, I'll own that and apologize to the group. Not the impression I was trying to give, but obviously missed the mark.
  10. 7 points
    Sweetie, you don't empower women, they own the power. It's not yours to give. Wendy P.
  11. 7 points
    Myself and my good friend Brent Findlay set a new national New Zealand record this past Saturday for the most number of jumps completed in a single day by a single person. Dubbed 'The Hundred Jump Project' our goal was to get at least 101 jumps in a single day each simultaneously to beat the current NZ record of 100 which has stood unbeaten since 1999. We managed to achieve an average of one jump each every 5.5 minutes for just under 12 hours non-stop (aside from fuelling obviously), eventually ending the day on 120 jumps each so we now co-own the new record. We jumped from 2,500ft (the lowest legal altitude under our governing rules) from a Fletcher aircraft. We had just the one plane but had 3 pilots who worked on a 10-jump rotation. We had an incredible ground crew of around 50 people including packers, pilots, safety, rig-swappers, catchers, food and hydration runners etc who all also worked on a roster rotation, our first jump was at sunrise 6:35am and our last jump was around 6:15pm. We are not night rated so we were restricted to daylight hours only. We used a total of 20 rigs with quite a large range of canopies. It was really fun to land a Crossfire 3 109, then 5 minutes later land a Saffire 3 150, then 5 minutes later land a 7 cell Krakken wingsuit canopy etc, it was a real test and we had 240 great landings. I know some of you will be referencing people like Jay Stokes and thinking that 120 isnt really a big deal, but it was a big deal for NZ and certainly a big deal for us personally. We used the challenge to raise funds for our local Mental Health Foundation, so far we have raised around $10,000NZD but we expect that number to climb as the NZ media continues to show a lot of interest. We both had one cutaway each which is pretty unlucky really. Both spinning linetwists which put us on our backs, pretty obvious you arent going to fix that from that altitude. Mine was at jump 55 and Brents was at jump 93. Both cutaways were textbook, kept both handles, landed exactly on target, swapped rigs and kept going. One of the coolest stats is that I got to do my 800th and 900th jump on the same day, which not many people can say. Anyway I just thought some of you might be interested in some of those stats. It was a super fun day and Im really proud of what we achieved. Heres a quick story from one of the news channels here in NZ, one of many to report on the event. https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/124237213/friends-push-through-parachute-fails-and-fatigue-to-set-new-skydive-record
  12. 7 points
    Looks like a lot of people don't understand the difference between "making good choices" and "having good choices".
  13. 7 points
    YOU don't get off the hook that easily. YOU are one of the enablers. Be ashamed.
  14. 7 points
    I'll say it again. All this nonsense is an indictment of the American education system. Seriously -- where are the (even most basic) critical thinking skills? Occam's razor, anyone?
  15. 7 points
    I'm surprised they let your friend jump at all. At one dropzone there were two young women who were treating the entire class (with other students) like it was just a wild hoot. The instructor (also a woman) came over and told them to go back to the office and get their refund, she was kicking them out of the class. End of story. Considering that this is a sport that can actually kill someone, I think instructors have a duty to not allow a student to jump if they just don't get it or act like they just don't care.
  16. 6 points
  17. 6 points
    "The problem with using the terms “hard” and “soft” is that they are often misinterpreted. “Hard” science is often misinterpreted to mean that the discipline is more difficult or that the methods are based on true scientific principles. This can make people believe that “soft” science is wishy-washy and ideological. The truth is that any scientific discipline, when practiced properly, is hard. The scientific method requires hypotheses that can be tested using proper control groups and carefully designed methods. The difference between a chemistry experiment and a human behavior experiment is that it is easy to put chemical mixtures into positive and negative control groups. It is not so easy to find human beings that conform to the design of the study. The bottom line is that to further any scientific discipline; hard or soft, it is critical that the scientist do her best to follow the scientific method. The most difficult part of any experiment is interpreting results. Confidence in conclusions depends on design study." ~Karen Reece, BS, MS, PhD Over the past two years, I too; have recently found myself in that situation and am only "walking" in the past three weeks. It has been a humbling experience fraught with frustrations and anger - at myself, at the world, etc. But, you probably know this. [EDIT] And it "woke" me to the plight of the handicapped. I used to think that I was being helpful by opening the door or offering to help in some way . . . What I never realized was that I was constantly reminding them that they are handicapped and that I was more fortunate. I'll let Oscar Pistorius, Ryan Raghoo and Sir Philip Craven share their thoughts with you on the matter. You asked for a couple of resources of whom I gave the original authors of CRT. You skimmed the attached article and found something to attack and support your ingrained thoughts on the subject and appear to have stopped there without reading more. Peek and You and I used to sit at the WFFC in the evenings and have long conversations about safety and the direction of skydiving at the end of the day. I remember you as being more receptive than rigid. I feel pretty safe in saying that you don't really want to learn more about CRT as much as you just want to argue by using references and talking points from those who support your position. And, you have a right to your opinion, so we'll just leave it there.
  18. 6 points
    Agreed, the vector issue is different in a subtle way. And in these cases, the devil is in the details. As far as the Icon stuff going on here, with three newly-made accounts all offering unsubstantiated photo's/videos of icons not properly working, I'm smelling either a hidden agenda or a big pile of bullshit. Cough up the details, or get the f* out.
  19. 6 points
    Be patient. Go to Purdue and apply yourself towards an engineering, computer science, cyber security, etc. degree. It's a tough university to be admitted to, so you must be smarter than the average bear. A Purdue degree will beat your local CA degree when interviewing. USPA stats show many jumpers have technical backgrounds (engineer and CS). Get a good job that pays well. Take up skydiving again. The sky's not going anywhere but you have an opportunity to go somewhere unique: Purdue and beyond. Be patient.
  20. 6 points
    WE KNOW! IT's from THAT day. EVERY time - THAT DAY. You keep posting the same hyperlink. For that day. This is exactly what pisses everyone off. You pick one data point out of trend and celebrate that data point like a five year-old that's discovered he can write his name in the snow while peeing.
  21. 6 points
    I notice a common theme among some people here. They can't explain their thinking, so they find a video and say "watch this whole thing." If you can't summarize your opinion, I'm not going to watch an hour and forty minute video to make up for that inability. Sorry. This is another common theme here - discarding any data that does not support your belief. "The Shockley-Quessier limit means solar is a pipe dream!" (this was an actual claim here) "The SC limit is not an issue in solar. First off, that states that single crystal solar can never be more than 33% efficient. It's 22% now - which means it can get better by at least 50%. And it's STILL economical - and the price is STILL coming down. Price is not really affected by the SC limit. And it doesn't apply to multilayer anyway, like perovskite plus silicon. That can get you to 69% efficiency, which means practically you could double today's efficiencies." "None of that is relevant." Once again - if you use "woman" as an insult against a guy (or "effeminate" or "feminine" etc) it means you think comparing someone to a woman denigrates them. Even if you have a sister or a friend who is a woman. It's actually pretty common in some circles, just as some people think "that's mighty white of you" is a compliment. Now, if you just posted without thinking, or you asked Joe that by mistake, no worries. You could apologize for your poor choice of words and/or misunderstanding and we could move on. But I am done letting sexism, racism etc just slide to "get along." I've done enough of that throughout my life and I'm not doing it any more. It may cost me some friends, but that's a price I am willing to pay.
  22. 6 points
    Resisting arrest, failing to comply, threatening to assault police officers... what does a white guy have to do to get suffocated around here?
  23. 6 points
    Occasionally I see a BH quote and am reminded why I blocked him. Thanks for reminding me why it’s best to ignore his ridiculous bullshtuff Joe
  24. 6 points
    That, hands down and against stiff competition, is one of your lamest statements yet. You realize we are all skydivers, yes? Some of us are also accomplished pilots, motocross racers, rock climbers, base jumpers, speed flyers, extreme scuba divers and a shit pot full of other cool risky things. But here are you in all of your brave glory being sad for us that we don't have the balls to go to Disneyland or your favorite Chucky Cheese owing to our fear of dying. Whatever.
  25. 6 points
    A post in "Friends of Hartwood" on Farcebook. ------------------------------------------------ Here's a shout out to Clay Schoelpple. Clay went back east after his dad passed. He was cleaning out some old shelves & found an old velcro pouch with some old guy's original log books, USPA licenses, SCS cards, etc. I had left those there in 1987 and never found them again. You can imagine what it must have taken for Clay to track me down 34 years later! I was in the Navy and moved a dozen times since then. Thank you, Clay! I miss those days at Hartwood and was sorry to hear about Harry. Blue Skies to all of you in the group & remind Clay what a great guy he is. - Bob Larys, D-6822
  26. 6 points
    36 hours after 2nd shot. I feel strong, going out to hunt bears in forest.
  27. 6 points
    If you storm the fucking Capitol there have to be consequences. If you support that action or incite it, there HAVE to be consequences. You don't get to try and overthrow democracy and just go 'Why won't you be friends?? I just want to move on together! You're so MEAN! waaaahhhhhhh'. Jesus. I've never seen such a bunch of whiners. And they call those on the left 'snowflakes'.... I thought the Republican party was all for personal responsibility? Letting it go is what will make a bad situation worse. There's a reason the policy of every major government and police force is not to negotiate with terrorists or blackmailers - they think they can get away with it and so they do it again and step it up the next time. So yes. Find those guilty. Make an example of them within the law, no matter how high or low they are in the political structure. Slap them all down as hard and fast as fucking possible. This is what the American Government does with insurrectionists, is going to be the message. We'd better make sure it's a good one.
  28. 6 points
    It’s weird to me. Growing up in the UK I heard stories from my grandparents about what it was like for civilians in WWII. Rationing. Blackouts. Travel restrictions. Air raids. All that stuff. They SACRIFICED as a country. They had to, and they got through it. Whereas our country isn’t willing to just suck up wearing a mask and maybe not traveling for the holidays for a single year... Its really not a lot to ask in the big scheme of things.
  29. 6 points
    The underlying problem here is that you are giving your own personal guess more credence than the educated opinions and conclusions of experts. If at the end of the day you're going to choose to ignore references cited by others, not cite any yourself, and stick to your own beliefs without any justification, why bother posting in the first place? It's completely astounding to me that you think you have the knowledge and skills to make such an inference. Why bother with virology and epidemiology when we have you? Aside from that, your thought process is flawed: 1) You've arbitrarily predicted (and stated as fact) that the outcomes of COVID will be (or "are", as if this is retrospective) similar to those of SARS, for reasons you haven't explained 2) You've been presented with scientific evidence that the outcomes of COVID are different from SARS 3) The only reasonable conclusion is that you were wrong at (1), yet somehow you conclude the opposite. That's not an argument--that's a statement of belief with nothing to back it, and it's wrong. You believe it because it seems intuitive, but intuition does not equal truth. You've already been provided with two specific example diseases that start as a mild viral infection but then later on become much more severe and even deadly. And you've been moving the goalposts, too. First it was "organ damage", then it was "organ failure", then you got called out on that and moved it to "severe organ damage".
  30. 6 points
    IMO while the world is, on average, becoming socially more progressive all the time, it has also been moving drastically towards the fiscal right for decades while people are simultaneously being brainwashed that it's too unfair to rich people and too good to the poor. IMO social programs in temrs of real dollars/pounds have never been weaker since the social safety net was first instituted in the early 20th century, while the rewards for success have never been higher compared to the average Joe, and the real tax burden on both wealthy individuals and corporations has never been lower. Anyone who thinks that poor people are the problem is fucking insane, IMO.
  31. 5 points
    You get offended at Bill assuming things about your 'level of awareness', but you go spouting off this bullshit about 'Woke ideology' and assuming that anybody giving any credence to 'wokeism' rolls with the caricature of it that Fox and the like have created...you and your pals on the right do this shit all the time: take an idea that's embraced by 'the enemy libtards', create a caricature of it and then hold that up as evidence that the whole idea is absurd....you say Woke is a Joke; your definition of woke is a caricature...OF COURSE IT'S A FUCKING JOKE! The rest of the world outside of your right-wing echo chamber doesn't necessarily share that definition. I'm not some social justice warrior and I take a lot of pride in the things I've accomplished in my life and professional career, but I do recognize that some of the doors that have been opened for me (or not closed to me) to allow me to have those successes might have been inched open, at least in part, just because I had the sheer dumb luck to be born in North America with a white penis attached to me. I try to appreciate the fact that some others have a tougher road to hoe for no fault of their own, and do bits to help out where I can. I consider that 'being woke', even if I'm sometimes too tired/lazy/distracted to do it to the level I'd like. If you consider that a mental illness, then I'm not going to finish this sentence as it'd get me banned.
  32. 5 points
    That’s way too many words for me to read Bill, could you just give us a quick summary?
  33. 5 points
    To me, an entanglement is like a pilot chute in tow. There is no perfect answer; people have died who didn’t cut away, and people have died who did. If there isn’t a good way to fix it, then you have to invest extra effort in preventing it. Wendy P.
  34. 5 points
    Please try to bring data, not opinions, to the discussion. That would include things like answering the questions about what the metal thing was coming out, how a rig was packed, and other things. "XXX sucks donkey dogs" is not data. Wendy P.
  35. 5 points
    Science is a process, not an end result.
  36. 5 points
    On the contrary, there's a LOT of money in that - the global health and wellness food market was valued at 707.12 billion U.S. dollars in 2016 and is projected to increase to 811.82 billion U.S. dollars by 2021. Seriously, stop demonising doctors and nurses as being money-chasing sociopaths. You're sitting behind your computer posting about the pandemic, while doctors and nurses who battle to keep covid patients alive and losing - and even dying - and you dare to imply that they only care about money. Do you only care about money?
  37. 5 points
    It’s not about pro Trump and anti Trump. It’s about complicit vs not complicit. Jim Jordan is not just crazy, not just a proven liar on a wild scale, not just an enthusiastic pusher of wild election fraud fantasies, he was literally in the room where it happened when Trump and his team were formulating their ‘let’s get everyone riled up’ pre riot plans. It’s not even just about the bias - you can’t make an investigator out of someone who could easily be subpoenaed as a witness to the things being investigated, and everyone knows that. Putting him forward in the first place is pure Republican political theatre.
  38. 5 points
    Here are some suggestions about factors contributing to the high rate of violence with firearms in the US compared to other first-world countries, based on my personal experience having lived in Canada for ~30 years, in Europe for a few years, and in the US for ~30 years. 1. Although there are angry people everywhere, there seem to be a lot more of them in the US. This includes everything from people who feel unfairly treated by the world to people who have learned that they can often intimidate other people and so get what they want by being hyper aggressive and threatening. Such people rarely if ever recognize that they contribute to their own problems in various ways and instead blame everyone else. Related to this is the fact that US culture is more competitive in a sink-or-swim sort of way, with almost all the emphasis on "you're on your own" and much less on "you're part of a society and we all need to look out for one another". 2. Economic disparities are larger in the US than in comparable first-world countries, with more barriers to moving out of the economic class to which you are born. The latter seems paradoxical in a country that prides itself on a culture that claims that anyone can get ahead by nothing more than hard work. However even a small contact with the "justice system" can create lifelong barriers to advancement, and such contact is much more likely for the poor, and for non-whites (although poor white people can be impacted for sure). As an example, in Georgia almost any felony conviction, which could be for possession of a tiny amount of pot, or (until recently) theft of anything worth more than $50, leads automatically to a lifetime ban on qualifying for a state license for anything. This means you can never work in nearly 80 professions state-licensed professions, including becoming a barber, cosmetologist, electrical contractor, plumber, conditioned air contractor, auctioneer, utility contractor, registered trade sanitarian, and scrap metal processor, among others (https://georgiaopportunity.org/access-professional-licenses-benefit-returning-citizens/). BTW this is the sort of thing that is included in "critical race theory"). These issues contribute to point 1. 3. The US is more tribal than any other developed country I have lived in. People tend to view members of other tribes with suspicion at best, and open hostility at worst. Members of other tribes are often seen as not fully human, and as undeserving of equal treatment under the law. Successful members of "other tribes" are often assumed to have gained their success unfairly (government handouts, affirmative action, white privilege, etc) rather than by honest effort. This contributes to point 1, and reduces "others" to "not really American" or "not fully human". 4. Although the US has laws against violent behavior, there is more acceptance of the idea that violence is sometimes necessary. American culture tends to celebrate the "outlaw", be it the John Wayne-style gunslinger or the hip-hop gangster. Cold-blooded killers who murdered numerous innocent people become folk heroes (Billy the Kid, Bonny & Clyde, etc). Although few would recommend using violence as the first resort to get your way, many quietly accept that sometimes you "just have to stand up and do what you have to do". We see this strongly in "stand your ground" laws that place "standing up and not allowing yourself to be pushed around" over retreating (even when it would be easy to avoid violence), even if the result is people being killed or maimed. The US entertainment industry is largely built around the idea that violence is sometimes the best response (probably because violence is more exciting and makes for more interesting story lines than negotiation and diplomacy). Also the US is much more militaristic than other developed countries, which (rightly or wrongly) supports the notion that violence is sometimes (or often) an appropriate way to respond to a challenge. 5. Firearms are easily accessible. Even if you are legally prohibited and so can't buy from a licensed dealer, you can easily get whatever you want through a private sale. Firearms are easily accessible in other countries. You can buy a semi-automatic rifle (but not a handgun) for hunting in Canada. So why is crime involving firearms less common by a wide margin in other countries? I suggest it's the combination of points 1-4, and no doubt others. How can this be fixed? I have no idea, certainly not in the short term. Perhaps that is why gun control is so attractive, it seems to be more "do-able" than fixing all the other things that lead to a relatively large population of angry people who can justify to themselves that violence is sometimes necessary, and anyway all those other people aren't really people, or Americans, or whatever. Don
  39. 5 points
    RSL is a lanyard connecting one of the main risers and reserve ripcord (and MARD if it's there). Once the reserve canopy is open, RSL doesn't have any function, but it still exists connected to the main riser. In case you have two canopies out and decide to cutaway the main, you will still have a lanyard dangling from the main riser which can get caught in something (for example, it could whip and wrap around the reserve risers). Disconnecting it reduces/removes the chances for this.
  40. 5 points
    Time to make friends with the neighbors who own EVs.
  41. 5 points
    We ARE a 'deeply dysfunctional, broken nation'. We're finally seeing cops being tried for murdering people in custody (or being murdered while being taken into custody). We just saw how deeply broken the military is and how women are treated within it. We just saw 74 million people vote for a criminal, who wanted to be a despot. We are still seeing the Republican party try to disenfranchise millions of voters, mostly minorities and the poor. We're seeing the results of disregarding science, dismissing education and pretending that ignorance is 'just fine'. One of those results is the highest death toll from Covid in the world. During the pandemic, the rich got richer and the poor got poorer. The amount of wealth gained by the richest people in the past year is appalling. Many of these things have long existed, and the true extent of them is just now being revealed. The idea of "American Exceptionalism" is one of the most arrogant pieces of nonsense I've ever seen, and yet it seems to be growing.
  42. 5 points
    Agreeing with Gerry Baumchen, The first freebags had no through loops (e.g. Strong Dual Hawk Tandem) and short closing loops were tied to internal flaps. Second generation freebags had through loops, but they still rubbed against reserve fabric (e.g. Talon 1 and all Vectors). loop length varies widely depending up the rigger's experience. I have only sewn patches on two reserves, but one of them was in a NARO. The reserve center cell suffered a small tear because a rigger used more muscle than skill in pulling the closing loop through the free bag. Even if I only have to patch one reserve every 1500 repacks, that is too often. Third generation free bags are pinched in the middle they are easier to with only a single grommet through both layers of the freebag (Javelin, Talon 2). They are easier to pack because they need fewer tools and have a consistent loop length. While working at Para-Phernalia, I managed to convince them to switch Softie free bags from second generation to third generation freebags. EOS, Atom and Icon are between second and third generation in that they have grommets in both the top and bottom skins of the free bag, but they also have fabric channels preventing the closing loop from ever rubbing against on reserve fabric. Fourth generation free bags have more secure lines stows to properly stage higher speed openings (Icon, Racer Speed bag). These are mostly found on tandem and military rigs that deploy much heavier and faster than solo rigs. If you have read this far, you understand why I clearly prefer third generation free bags.
  43. 5 points
    Brother, I have to side with the left on this one. And, in part, you are correct. One-time shot in the arms aren't that great, but it is something. IMO: It should have been $600 - $1,000/month this whole time. Any time there's a recession/depression, the Keynesian Model works. Get money into the hands of the consumers that make less than "X" and they spend. Moving money around is what gets the economy to rebound.
  44. 5 points
    Is the emoticon supposed to be you? I'd have chosen differently. Look, a country is many things but more than anything it is a society of people who choose to adopt a common identity and who work toward common goals for the common good. Those things generally come together very slowly for the whole. It's just reasonable that when most people have decided things like racism and racist behavior are no longer a part of their identity then they also no longer see it as a part of their national identity and, by extension, no longer identify with certain symbols of their racist past. It's not about starting over or denying our past it's about standing up for who we are now as a people. That's a good thing.
  45. 5 points
    Qanon: The religion for people who find Scientology too rational and boring.
  46. 5 points
    In all fairness, until you've stood in line at a Seattle Starbucks at 6am waiting to order a triple Americano while some purple haired asshole at the front struggles with whether or not he wants a maraschino cherry on top of his double decaf, nonfat mocha with extra foam and a lemon spritzer you'll never see the comparison.
  47. 5 points
    There was a man from Kent whose virus' sequence was bent. It made one no sicker, but passed on much quicker, so faster and faster it went.
  48. 5 points
    I'm embarrassed to say this guy was a Marine (and have been embarrassed by him for some time). I'm pretty forgiving when people who have never served in government are elected to office, and then overstep or misunderstand (innocent mistakes) ethics and finance rules. But military officers have to engage in -- and often lead -- annual discussions and training sessions on this stuff. As a member of congress he committed gross violations of finance laws and ethics regulations (to the point that I wouldn't even have excused them for someone who might not "know better"). Double whammy. It's guys like him who make it so military members can be forced to take on even more training sessions, with documented attendance and participation -- taking away from doing our regular mission and from the annual skills training calendar. It's disgusting.
  49. 5 points
    Hi folks, It would appear that the only way Trump gets to 270 is if he loses 50 pounds. Jerry Baumchen
  50. 5 points
    Guys, this is a serious matter - he's part of at least three high risk groups: elderly, obese, poor...
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