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MIKELOCK34

Is skydiving dangerous? (Was - Fatality Perris 18 Mar 2019)

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43 minutes ago, MIKELOCK34 said:

Skydiving is much less dangerous than most of your daily activities. 

I'm curious as to what most of your daily activities are?

There is no amount of training, knowledge, or equipment that will stop gravity and its effects should shit hit the fan.

It is a dangerous sport that can be done somewhat safely. I think we can agree that inherently there is nothing safe about exiting an aircraft at 13k feet. 

 

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1 hour ago, MIKELOCK34 said:

Skydiving is much less dangerous than most of your daily activities. I stress safety twenty-four hours a day. "Everything" is dangerous out of context. Skydiving is a very safe sport made dangerous by people who get ahead of their training and abilities. I see people constantly putting themselves in very dangerous situations while skydiving and laughing about it later. If skydiving is dangerous to you, it is because you are making it so. Current training programs and equipment are in place to keep us safe. It is the individual who makes skydiving unsafe not the sport itself.

Most of the research done over the last several years would disagree. Most of the people who have died in the last several years would not meet your definition of someone who 'constantly putting themselves in very dangerous situations while skydiving and laughing about it later.' Most of the fatalities that have occurred in the last several years were from everyday skydivers.
 

Edited by 20kN
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2 hours ago, MIKELOCK34 said:

Skydiving is much less dangerous than most of your daily activities.

Not unless you're an embassy guard in Syria or something.  Skydiving is a dangerous sport.  It can injure you or kill you.  There are very few other sports out there where NOT taking very definitive action will kill you, and where you are so dependent on something you can't see (the atmosphere, traffic above us.)

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I stress safety twenty-four hours a day. "Everything" is dangerous out of context. Skydiving is a very safe sport made dangerous by people who get ahead of their training and abilities. I see people constantly putting themselves in very dangerous situations while skydiving and laughing about it later. If skydiving is dangerous to you, it is because you are making it so.

I will give you three examples that disprove that - Pat McGowan, Bob Holler and Roger Nelson.  All three were doing everything right.  Then someone hit them under canopy and killed them.

And that can happen to ANYONE no matter how safe they are trying to be.  You can be doing a 20-way with the best in the business and someone forward of you in the exit can have a premature deployment.  You can be in the plane, ready to do a solo on your own pass, and lose an engine on takeoff.  You can be clearing your airspace every ten seconds, and someone can turn into you from above your canopy where you can't see.  You can be flying the pattern all by yourself and get taken out by a dust devil that formed over the grass.  You can cut away from a spinner and get reserve lines trapped in your rig.  You can have a rogue opening on a perfectly good, well maintained, properly packed parachute that is hard enough to kill you.

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Current training programs and equipment are in place to keep us safe. It is the individual who makes skydiving unsafe not the sport itself.

Current training programs - and modern equipment - do wonders to reduce the risk.  They will never be able to make it safe.

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2 hours ago, MIKELOCK34 said:

It is the individual who makes skydiving unsafe not the sport itself.

That is only one factor among many. The real reason skydiving is inherently dangerous is it's unforgiving nature. The opportunities to make an error are many and the consequences have a high likelihood of injury. You sound like a man who believes that your training and preparation will keep you safe. You are only partly correct. You have reduced your odds of injury and you should be congratulated for your efforts. But even well trained people make mistakes sometimes, random events you can't anticipate can occur, and someone else's error can get you.

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i think your all right, and wrong

to equate this to motorbikes.... almost all bike crashes are the bikers fault, they didn't see the person pulling out on them cos they were going to fast, in a bad road position or just not paying attention, the stats are all squued by not accounting for me riding safely 

 

but to say motorbikes are safe if im riding it would be a lie.... its just less dangerous, i accept the risk cos its fun, being aware of that keeps me alive....

 

seems to me that this is the same deal

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In mountaineering/backcountry skiing people talk about danger and events (usually avalanches, but theoretically it could apply to anything) in terms of both probability and consequence. Almost everything in skydiving would fall under the "high consequence" category, regardless of how rare it is (or who's fault it is -- jumper, packer, another jumper, etc). If two jumpers collide under canopy, (not super common, but it does happen), does it really matter who's fault it was? It's a dangerous, potentially fatal situation for both of them -- including the one who theoretically wasn't at fault.

We're all human and none of us are infallible, and you can't really treat real situations involving real humans like some numerical model you whipped up on Mathematica or something.

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