ChrisHoward

Members
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Gear

  • Main Canopy Size
    79
  • Main Canopy Other
    Valkyrie
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    126
  • AAD
    Cypres 2

Jump Profile

  • Home DZ
    Skydive Philadelphia
  • License
    D
  • License Number
    28490
  • Licensing Organization
    USPA/APF
  • Number of Jumps
    14000
  • Years in Sport
    18
  • First Choice Discipline
    Swooping
  • Second Choice Discipline
    BASE Jumping
  • Freefall Photographer
    No

Ratings and Rigging

  • AFF
    Instructor
  • Tandem
    Instructor
  • USPA Coach
    Yes
  • Pro Rating
    No
  • Wingsuit Instructor
    No
  • Rigging Back
    Master Rigger
  • Rigging Chest
    Master Rigger
  • Rigging Seat
    Master Rigger

Recent Profile Visitors

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  1. I agree. This is a sore point for me too. I would also include any sport rig that the manufacturer has decided they will "No Longer Support". If they don't want their old gear out there anymore then they should step up and issue an AD. Instead they are trying to dodge liability by dumping the onus on the field rigger.
  2. The OP will pack smaller than the LPV. In my experience the LPV offers the least bulk reduction of all the low bulk reserves I have packed. As a side note, the Icon sizing isn't great from my experience and I wouldn't trust using their chart to confirm fit on extreme ends of their scale.
  3. I suspect it would go along the same lines as AADs. If it's not TSOable then simply insist that it can't impede normal reserve function.
  4. I feel it is important to add 2 additional comments on design differences so that people don't simply walk away with your 20lb vs 40lb statement. 1) The Javelin RPC doesn't need to push past all the flaps that Vector/Icon/Mirage etc do, making its job easier. and 2) The Javelin RPC also stands taller than other RPC designs giving it launch benefits that I am not smart enough to quantify.
  5. 1000 jumps is many many years for some jumpers. To claim his product won't "Cut It" because it can't achieve some random number is just silly. What Df8m1 should do is say that his unit will require battery changes when "prompted" by the control unit. That way he won't be judged against some arbitrary metrics no one else is held to.
  6. So there is the M2 apparently. I am not going to use that as any Standard Bench mark, especially considering it's relatively short field history (I will wait until one lasts its 15 years 1st). Cypres still has a service cycle, it's just left to the user to decide to maintain it or not. And guess what they do at the 5 year cycle, check/change the battery. It even lists "Power supply:...........................................................service life warranty**" And guess what the "**" is. "** If maintenances have been performed within the scheduled time frames." Vigil 1 had a 10yr battery and look what happened there. They had to run a trade in program because they couldn't get the batteries any more. Vigil 2 also had a 10 yr battery but guess what, Any unit more than 8 years old will automatically get a battery change if it is returned to the service center for any reason. And that doesn't even account for the "Expect 5yrs or 2000 jump minimum", stated in their manual. So Airtec doesn't state a life limit, A.A.D. states an expected minimum of 2000 jumps, and Mars states 15 years or 15000 jumps which at this point remains nothing more than marketing. There is no "Industry Standard". His point is invalid. Period.
  7. Well he definitely won't be able to "cut it" if you simply go making up your own arbitrary "Standards". Please feel free to point out what manufacturer states 10,000 jumps to be an expected "Standard" battery life.
  8. https://www.vigil.aero/history From my memory Vigil 2s started around SN:8000 and Vigil 2+ SN was around high 30-40000. Not sure from memory what SN the Cuatro kicked in.
  9. Something else for you to consider would be your location. Your profile suggests you are located in Sydney. I would be willing to bet that the vast majority of Talons in Australia were built by Parachutes Australia who are conveniently located in Sydney. Of the 3 rigs you mentioned one has local support, just saying....
  10. A side note to consider, extraction problem or not, pulling immediately out the door is begging for line twists. Even if you solve your extraction problem you should still consider taking a longer delay to generate the airspeed necessary to lift the bag quicker and cleaner than a 2 second delay will provide. P.S. I jump an RSK 1 and an RSK .5 and have found that overly tight configurations will cause the hesitation you are experiencing. Something I have noticed to be beneficial is to ensure your closing loop is tight, the tighter the better. This will keep the canopy compressed nice a neat inside the container until the pin is extracted at which point the container will relax some making it easier for the bag to lift out.
  11. Does anyone out there remember a little thing called "Google"? A quick search turns up this: http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/rgTSO.nsf/MainFrame?OpenFrameSet Seems like a good place to start. The Airforce Reserve is not listed among PAs other TSOs.
  12. I don't know about "peer reviewed" but there is a long list of credits in the manual the Poynter gives recognition to.
  13. You might consider Parachutist or Blue Skies Magazine.
  14. I'm confused. You asked for opinions on a big drogue to slow you down with heavy customers. Now you are complaining because you can feel the larger drogue doing its job?
  15. 9 cells support the weight better than 7 cell canopies of the same size (due to increased structure) giving them better flight performance and flare power. Also a number of popular tandem reserves were at one point a tandem main before being designated as only a reserve.