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masterrigger1

Advanced Rigger Training

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I am trying to gather enough input to see if it will be worth putting an advanced rigger training class together soon.

Also what topics or subjects people would like to see taught or covered.


Feel free to PM me or post your thoughts on this.


BS,
MEL
Skyworks Parachute Service, LLC
www.Skyworksparachuteservice.com

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I see a lot of people who learn to pack reserves. They tend to be lost beyond that. Whenever they take on a more challenging project the results tend to vary between amusing and terrifying. Sewing, repair, materials, standards of construction, but more then that the reasoning of why and the purpose behind these things. On any subject off the beaten path they are lost in the woods not simply because they do not know the answer but because they cannot extrapolate from a greater fundamental understanding.
If you really want to address some of the scariness in the sport… as a dpre could you hold a rigging coarse out side the U.S.? The scariest shit I’ve seen has been from over seas. There are plenty of countries where they jump that there are no riggers, none. I’ll bet they would all get together and fly you down there. I know it’s not the norm but could a foreigner actually be issued a license? Could you get away with calling a U.S. tso’ed rig a “U.S. registered aircraft”? Even if it were informal it would be an improvement over some of the shit I’ve watched them drag in over the years.

Lee
Lee
lee@velocitysportswear.com
www.velocitysportswear.com

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I know it’s not the norm but could a foreigner actually be issued a license?


RL,
You can issue a license to a non-national.

All that is required is that they read and speak English and be 18 years old or older.


BS,
MEL
Skyworks Parachute Service, LLC
www.Skyworksparachuteservice.com

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yes i would be very intrested in inproving my skills as a senior rigger.I would like to know more about the sylabus,where and when of it.
Please contact me ASAP.



Cissco,
This is exactly what I am asking for; what the student would like for the syllabus to be.

For example:
Cell Replacement

Rib Replacement

Proper Relining Techniques
with the different materials (HMA- Vectran- Spectra- Dacron)

Harness Repair with the different articulated harness/container systems out there.

Industrial Sewing Machine Repair.

Riser Construction


..and the list goes on!

These are a few of the things I have thought of.

It also could be the pre-training for a Master's rating if need be.

BS,
MEL
Skyworks Parachute Service, LLC
www.Skyworksparachuteservice.com

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Or continued education for senior/master riggers.

Industrial sewing machine maintenance/repair is high on my list since I'm having trouble getting a certain DPRE named MEL to come help me (again) with a couple of trouble machines.:P

Anyway, sign me up...whatever the course material, I'm interested.

Mike
ChutingStar.com

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Mike,
I am there this weekend I will have you know!

It's my last weekend at home(Right Coast) for awhile.

Anyway.........


MEL



Yay!!! My Singer 143W2, Consew 195RB and harness machine are all calling your name...loudly. And thanks so much for the repaired needle bar for the Pfaff 3334...it was back in service for a reline that same day. Thanks...

Mike
ChutingStar.com

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the Items you have mentioned are what I would be Very intrested in how to accomplish plus my special intrest of replaceing panels in round canopys especially Paracommanders as I have one that I would like to repanel it with zero P.

Tell me when and where and I will be there.

Paul Gundlach

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I have never seen a sylabus for FAA MAster Rigger training. You might want to start with the FAA's latest rigging Manual, written by Sandy Reid.
On that note, Sandy refused to share his syllabus with me.
Another alternative would be CSPA's extensive syllabus for Rigger B. CSPA's syllabus includes just about every type of canopy or harness repair you can think of. Because I hold a foreign equivalent (FAA Master Rigger), CSPA's Technical Committee allowed me "direct entry", so I only had to submit the samples on the last page of the syllabus: log book cover, main slider with kill-lines, split main slider, main pilot chute with kill-line bridle, mini 3-Ring risers, gear bag, reserve freebag, main d-bag, a complete harness including 3-Rings, etc.

Sewing machine repairs should be part of any advanced rigger training. Aside from a few lectures during PIA Symposia, I have had hardly any formal training in sewing machine repair and really wish that I knewmore.

As for panel replacement or rib replacement, I usually mail those back to the factory. Granted, I may have sewn - and jumped - a couple of kit parachutes back in the 1980s, but I don't have the dozens of patterns needed to replace panels in popular sport canopies.
More valuable would be lectures on measuring line trim - including methods form at least four different manufacturers and advice on how to install factory-supplied line kits. Also plenty of instruction on how to repair one line at a time.

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Rob,

Where would one look to get a copy of CSPA's syllabus for Rigger B?



>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

You could ask me to look on the dusty back shelf of my loft, or you could bug CSPA's Technical Committee to mail you a copy.

As far as I know, CSPA's Rigger B SOLO Program is not available in an electronic format.
CSPA Rigger Bs have the same knowledge, responsibilities and privileges as FAA Master Riggers.

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Rob,
Here's what it is looking like:

We will break it down into different modules.

1. Industrial Sewing Machine Repair

2. Major Canopy Repair- consisting of Cell replacement, rib replacement and how to hand cut replacement panels.

3.Line Replacement-proper construction,bartacking with manual and computerized bartackers,and line installation.
The methods differ with the different line materials out so that will have to be covered also.

4. Harness Construction and Repair

5. Container Repair- Probably the easiest area to cover.


Just wondering if everyone would want to do it in one trip or break it down just to each module????


Email or post yours thoughts on this matter please.
Thanks,
MEL
Skyworks Parachute Service, LLC
www.Skyworksparachuteservice.com

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Hi Mark,

Quote

Just wondering if everyone would want to do it in one trip or break it down just to each module????



Could you give a breakdown of an estimate on time req'd to complete each module? That would effect any response from me.

Some things I am interested in and some I could not care less about.

Thanks,

Jerry

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Sounds great, sign me up !!!! 3 more weekends on the right coast for me... then to the left coast for 5 days, then to the island for 4 weeks, then to home for turkey dinner, then to trestles area through x-mas. I can assist you in Dec between sessions. Later, back to the rigging floor.

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I can foresee two possible schedules for advanced rigger training.
You could either study for a week at a time, or you could run a month-long course. A month-long course would better suit military riggers or civilians who have to travel long distances.
Another possibility would be to introduce your school at the PIA Symposium by offering a sample lecture.

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I can foresee two possible schedules for advanced rigger training.
You could either study for a week at a time, or you could run a month-long course. A month-long course would better suit military riggers or civilians who have to travel long distances.
Another possibility would be to introduce your school at the PIA Symposium by offering a sample lecture.



Not really Rob... those of us that have a "day job" could swing a week off of work... maybe two, but I doubt many employers would let us take a month off.

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ZZM,
We would do it here either in this shop or the other one.

*Looking at maybe 10 people Max

I am thinking of doing the modules each on a Friday, Saturday, and Sunday if needed.

That could change depending on who wants what.

That way the people that want to learn a particular subject can just come for that module.

i.e. sewing machine repair.
On Friday do a briefing and demo.
Give each person a machine to reassemble, time, and adjust.

They would each need to go through a Single needle,Zig-Zag, Bartack machine, walking foot,and Harness machine.

And no.... they would not be using my production machines.
I have plenty in reserve for mockups. and parts.....!
I am sure someone will crunch something somewhwere, but that's the point!

BS,
MEL
Skyworks Parachute Service, LLC
www.Skyworksparachuteservice.com

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