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schon267

high jumps

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I have a question regarding a jump from 18,000'

do you need oxygen for that jump or not?? and what about 15,000'??

I saw an add for a dropzone on the spacecoast of florida for doing tandums from 18,000', but you can also do reg. jumps from that alt.

I'm still a baby in this sport and still trying to learn, can someone explain this to me?? thanks a lot

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There are recommendations for "intermediate" high altitude jumps in the SIM in Section 6-7

there's also a really nice Chart layout in section 6-7 of the Downloadable PDF version (page 154 of 247).

or you could buy yourself a copy... http://www.uspa.org/shop/pubs/SIM.htm as it is a very good resource.

but for what its worth I have done several jumps from 15,000-16,000 ft with out a problem and if the jumps are out of something like a Beach King air the have such a high climb rate that its probably not an issuw since you're at/above the altitude for such a short time.

I hope this helps...
Livin' on the Edge... sleeping with my rigger's wife...

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I have jumped there (not often) - no oxygen for 15k and I am pretty sure the speed of the plane to 18k is such that no oxygen is required for those jumps either. Regular jumps would be no problem - when I was last there the whole load had to agree to the extra altitude (cost a few bucks more I think)..

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I'm NOT totally useless... I can be used as a bad example

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I've been jumping there a lot, and we don't use oxygen to 18,000 k because the King Airs only take 6 minutes to get to altitude. If you want to go to 18,000 k verses 15,500 ft it's only 5 extra bucks if you're an experienced jumper. Tandems pay an extra 30 bucks.

PMS #449 TPM #80 Muff Brother #3860
SCR #14705 Dirty Sanchez #233

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but for what its worth I have done several jumps from 15,000-16,000 ft with out a problem and if the jumps are out of something like a Beach King air the have such a high climb rate that its probably not an issuw since you're at/above the altitude for such a short time.



I've ridden a C206 to 18k - you can imagine how long that took. O2 wasn't used until 13, and that was shared with my buddy who was going out as a tandem. Yes, I got pretty hypoxic. And as billvon has written, it can happen on the 15k MSL jumps, esp if the pilot needs to hunt for a gap in the clouds.

OTOH, a KA with 9 people to 24k with O2 - no problem till I took off the mask.

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I have a question regarding a jump from 18,000'

do you need oxygen for that jump or not?? and what about 15,000'??

I saw an add for a dropzone on the spacecoast of florida for doing tandums from 18,000', but you can also do reg. jumps from that alt.

I'm still a baby in this sport and still trying to learn, can someone explain this to me?? thanks a lot



I did a jump from 23,000 ft at the WFFC.
wore an oxygen mask in the plane, took it off just prior to exit.
__

My mighty steed

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http://www.uspa.org/publications/SIM/2006SIM/section9part91.htm#91211

FAR Sec. 91.211 Supplemental oxygen

(a) General. No person may operate a civil aircraft of U.S. registry--

(1) At cabin pressure altitudes above 12,500 feet (MSL) up to and including 14,000 feet (MSL) unless the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of the flight at those altitudes that is of more than 30 minutes duration;

(2) At cabin pressure altitudes above 14,000 feet (MSL) unless the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen during the entire flight time at those altitudes; and

(3) At cabin pressure altitudes above 15,000 feet (MSL) unless each occupant of the aircraft is provided with supplemental oxygen.

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Yea, I jump up at Longmont, CO and basically every jump we hit 17,500 MSL. There's O2 in the plane if someone needs it (I've never seen anybody use it). Usually though, the otter takes less than 15 minutes to get up to altitude, so no hypoxia for us!



Out of curiosity, what's your altitude AGL when you jump?

If you're living at higher altitudes, you're probably pretty well acclimated to handle something like that, whereas someone who lives at SL might have a problem. That's interesting :)

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Out of curiosity, what's your AGL when you jump?



AGL is about 5,000ft.

Yea, I have some cousins that live on the coast of Georgia, and when they come to visit, I took them to Pikes Peak once (its a 14,110ft MSL) and they were getting sem-happy from the lack of O2. But nothing too serious.

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Out of curiosity, what's your AGL when you jump?



AGL is about 5,000ft.

Yea, I have some cousins that live on the coast of Georgia, and when they come to visit, I took them to Pikes Peak once (its a 14,110ft MSL) and they were getting sem-happy from the lack of O2. But nothing too serious.



AGL is 12,500. Longmont is at 5,000 above sea level. so that would be equal to 17,500 on the coast.



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be aware that altitude and time and physical condition affect each of use differently. if you smoke or have asthma you may be more suseptable. I've been to 20,000 without o2 but I could really feel it. just be self aware and aware of others around you:)
Experience is a difficult teacher, she gives you the test first and the lesson afterward

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