0
Namowal

Noob Cartoons: Skydiving Duck

Recommended Posts

Quote

WOOOT!! cant wait to get home to read it :)


Thanks, Mutumbo. I hope it was worth the wait.

Quote

Very entertaining! Keep 'em coming.


Will do.

Quote

I'd find it pretty scary sitting next to the door with no rig on!!!


I knew it was a matter of time before someone called me on that.:$
I spent a lot of time on that pic- redrawing and reworking details, but I didn't notice the rig was missing until right before I published it. Gear check FAIL! :S:D

Quote

Even if you were a bird?


That irony occurred to me too.

Quote

"As god as my witness, I thought turkeys could fly."



Quote

"The turkeys are falling like sacks of wet cement. Oh the humanity."


That scene never gets old. B|
My blog with the skydiving duck cartoons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keep your groups small... 2-3 people and get the more experienced person to be the base. Less fun for that person, but forces you to fly your body.

A really fun one to do... no grips, just open palms. can be done with as many people as you want. (Although smaller groups are easier.) The docks are open palm on top of someone else's open hand. This forces you to fly your body the entire time and keeps you from relaxing too much or over stressing and using someone else to aid your stability. (Imagine your hand flat on a table, with someone else's hand flat on top of yours... that's the dock. Flat palm on a leg for a leg dock... etc.)

Give that a try and see how that helps. It often times even throws off skilled jumpers sometimes.;)
Some people refrain from beating a dead horse. Personally, I find a myriad of entertainment value when beating it until it becomes a horse-smoothie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Here's my latest report. I'm not learning as fast as some of my peers, but I'm learning.
Skydiving Duck: Jump Runt



It is not a race to learn. Some people may learn faster than you. Some people may learn slower than you. As long as you are safe and enjoying yourself that is what is important. This is a great, fun hobby, don't let self-criticism take away the pure unadulterated joy. (trust me, I am self-critical too).

Also, you are almost to your B license, that's great!
"What if there were no hypothetical questions?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In the just so you know department -- standup landings are overrated. Walk-away landings are not. You have your priorities on straight.

And yeah, continuing to jump a bigger canopy just means that you have more brain cells left to focus on the rest of the jump, rather than being scared of what your canopy is going to do to you this time

Wendy P.
There is nothing more dangerous than breaking a basic safety rule and getting away with it. It removes fear of the consequences and builds false confidence. (tbrown)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Here's my latest report. I'm not learning as fast as some of my peers, but I'm learning.



Don't be embarrassed by that in the least. You've done 48 jumps on your own so far and lived; that's kick-ass! On every jump, you should be so proud of yourself for exiting a plane 2 miles up and landing safely at the dropzone. It's an impressive feat in itself! B|
She is Da Man, and you better not mess with Da Man,
because she will lay some keepdown on you faster than, well, really fast. ~Billvon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey, thanks for all the kind words :)
Quote


It is not a race to learn. Some people may learn faster than you. Some people may learn slower than you. As long as you are safe and enjoying yourself that is what is important. This is a great, fun hobby, don't let self-criticism take away the pure unadulterated joy. (trust me, I am self-critical too).


Good points. Thanks.
Quote


Also, you are almost to your B license, that's great!


Holy Smoke in a Twisted Stack... ...how did that happen?:oB|
Quote

And yeah, continuing to jump a bigger canopy just means that you have more brain cells left to focus on the rest of the jump, rather than being scared of what your canopy is going to do to you this time.


I plan do downsize eventually, but I'm in no hurry. I don't see myself getting anything real small and speedy. I'd rather have something bigger that I can control than some crazy little canopy that gets me into trouble.

Quote

Don't be embarrassed by that in the least. You've done 48 jumps on your own so far and lived; that's kick-ass! On every jump, you should be so proud of yourself for exiting a plane 2 miles up and landing safely at the dropzone. It's an impressive feat in itself!


It's funny that way. On the DZ I'm nothing special (skill wise, though everyone is nice to me). In everyday world I'm Person With the Exciting (or Crazy) Hobby. Different worlds. B|
Ah well, at least I'm having fun.B|
My blog with the skydiving duck cartoons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

It's funny that way. On the DZ I'm nothing special (skill wise, though everyone is nice to me). In everyday world I'm Person With the Exciting (or Crazy) Hobby. Different worlds. B|
Ah well, at least I'm having fun.B|



You will soon notice that on the DZ what you do in the other world has absolutely no importance. I have jumped with trauma surgeons, Marine Lt. Colonels, several PhDs, an astronaut (!), and lots of waitresses & bartenders. All that gets pushed aside when you put your rig on. Everybody's equal.

In the everyday world skydiving is so outside the realm of normalcy that I don't doubt that your friends and co-workers gossip about you around the water fountain and look at you with a certain amount of excitement and wonder. Soak it up. Enjoy your fame.
"For you see, an airplane is an airplane. A landing area is a landing area. But a dropzone... a dropzone is the people."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And have a word to the person who whistled past you after you had already opened.

They need to be a bit more aware of what is going on around them, and to get their own tracking right.

They came from above, and the low person has right of way. You did nothing wrong.

Even if you don´t think so, you are learning and gaining more experience every time you jump.

As do every skydiver, no matter how many jumps they have. Learning never stops.
My computer beat me at chess, It was no match for me at kickboxing....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

You will soon notice that on the DZ what you do in the other world has absolutely no importance. I have jumped with trauma surgeons, Marine Lt. Colonels, several PhDs, an astronaut (!), and lots of waitresses & bartenders. All that gets pushed aside when you put your rig on. Everybody's equal.


It is interesting how diverse the crowd is, and how involvement in the sport seems to trump other differences.B|
Quote

And have a word to the person who whistled past you after you had already opened.
They need to be a bit more aware of what is going on around them, and to get their own tracking right.



I'm not sure who it was, but in a weird way he did me a favor. It was a "Look what can happen when you don't watch where you're going!" moment- an extra incentive to pay attention when I'm tracking, so I don't become that guy.
My blog with the skydiving duck cartoons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote



I'm not sure who it was, but in a weird way he did me a favor. It was a "Look what can happen when you don't watch where you're going!" moment- an extra incentive to pay attention when I'm tracking, so I don't become that guy.

Too bad you couldn't figure out who it was. They screwed up and could use a little coaching-and-counseling, as we call it in the FAA.;):D

Very true about lessons learned. As you track, don't stare at the horizon. No one has ever hit the horizon.:D Look mostly down and in front, where you're going, to look for hazards below. With a little practice you'll be amazed at how your awareness will expand. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Here's my latest report. I'm not learning as fast as some of my peers, but I'm learning.
Skydiving Duck: Jump Runt



Phunny pics, I liked them! And the message you convey: Kepp on learning / jumping! Good duck! :)
And... wow! Can it be you read my online skydiving logbook and put all my mishaps into a cartoon? I started at age 41 and always took comfort in the following sentence: Learning curve - due to age - is flatter, but that's counteracted by - age-related - higher number in jumps. :PB|
Means: Ya gonna do it and next year you'll report about your latest 4-way adventures, I'm sure!

As for the open knees (to avoid the term "legs spread too wide" :):P:P:P) an instructor gave my a nice tip: Once you're stable, "clap" your feet two or three times, will help you get your legs more narrow to each other.
The sky is not the limit. The ground is.

The Society of Skydiving Ducks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote


And... wow! Can it be you read my online skydiving logbook and put all my mishaps into a cartoon? I started at age 41 and always took comfort in the following sentence: Learning curve - due to age - is flatter, but that's counteracted by - age-related - higher number in jumps. :PB|
Means: Ya gonna do it and next year you'll report about your latest 4-way adventures, I'm sure!


Thanks. Looking forward where I can do four way stuff. Or should I say, do four way stuff correctly. Right now even keeping level with a single person is a challenge.
Quote


As for the open knees (to avoid the term "legs spread too wide" :):P:P:P) an instructor gave my a nice tip: Once you're stable, "clap" your feet two or three times, will help you get your legs more narrow to each other.


I sometimes forget the toe taps. I think what happens is I find myself stable and assume there's no problem. It's not until I see a photo or video that I realize there's a problem.
My blog with the skydiving duck cartoons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Here's the latest. I'm not progressing as fast as I'd like (boo freaking hoo) , but I am learning...
Over Fifty Not-so-Nifty




Don't worry about the (purported) name-calling. If you end up with a duck nickname all will turn out well! :)
Like you, I did not progress as fast as I thought I should (who did?), but then ended up doing some really fantastic things.

quack quack.

But you have to understand, mental illness is like cholesterol. There is the good kind and the bad. Without the good kind- less flavor to life. - Serge A. Storms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nice cartoon. I laughed much about the "when kids start yelling 'beer'" :ph34r:

Good decision. Better stay down if the winds are high and/or gusty/weird... The sky will be there for you the other day but you can only jump if you are not injured ;)

And if it is any comfort to you - I also progressed much more slowly than I wanted to, due to a number of reasons (#1 of which is I started skydiving at the age of 40 ;))

As long as you are safe and have fun all is well.
The sky is not the limit. The ground is.

The Society of Skydiving Ducks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Good job!! :)
Stay safe to jump another day!!! :)



It can be tough to scratch- I'm sabotaging the planned jump, I'm passing up a chance to "get my money's worth" on rental gear, the inner critic saying "Ah, you're just chickening out!" etc...
...but as you said, better to scratch then to get hurt.

Quote

Glad to see you've got the beer rules sorted


Some five-year-olds at the DZ seem to have them sorted too.B|

Quote

Don't worry about the (purported) name-calling. If you end up with a duck nickname all will turn out well! Smile


Name calling? People are calling me names? I figured between my sloppy jumping and, as a amateur, taking up pages of Parachutist that I'd get on some people's nerves. :$ Boo freaking hoo.:P

Quote

Like you, I did not progress as fast as I thought I should (who did?), but then ended up doing some really fantastic things.


Now you're talking!:)
Quote

And if it is any comfort to you - I also progressed much more slowly than I wanted to, due to a number of reasons (#1 of which is I started skydiving at the age of 40


I've heard the same thing from other people who started at my age. I wonder if it's a physical thing, a mental thing, or both?
My blog with the skydiving duck cartoons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

I'm not progressing as fast as I'd like (boo freaking hoo) , but I am learning...

Like you, I did not progress as fast as I thought I should

I also progressed much more slowly than I wanted to

I've heard the same thing from other people who started at my age. I wonder if it's a physical thing, a mental thing, or both?



Wow.....I fit right in here! B| Slowly progressing here too, though getting there. Your duck is helping a lot. :P

It's probably a combination of both, physical and mental. Mental, as in - we're old enough to know we're not invincible anymore, like so many younger peeps tend to think, and therefore a little more cautious. Dunno....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

0