Bigfalls

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  1. I occasionally read this forum but not often because there is so much. Recently a skydiver friend of mine passed away. At his calling hours someone related the story that right after the hijacking, he was contacted by authorities, FBI I think. His last name was Cooper, It wasn't him but he lived in a small town in central New York State. Interesting that they contacted someone on the other side of the country.
  2. I am in favor of the museum and have donated personally. When Bill Ottley was alive, I offered to donate land on my Airport for the museum. One of the large DZ's may possibly be willing to build a hangar at their DZ for use as a museum. I think the current plans are too grandiose, too expensive to construct and too expensive to maintain. I like the idea of co-locating with another aviation museum. As far as other locations are concerned, DeLand Airport would seem logical, large DZ, parachute equipment manufacturers, close to Daytona, not that far from Orlando tourist attractions. Maybe some skydivers would be willing to volunteer to staff it.
  3. My first malfunction was jump # 8 on a 28 foot double L. Hand deployed the 24 foot unmodified reserve, everything worked and landed on the runway with 2 canopies. Second malfunction was about jump 50 - 55 on a 28 foot 7TU at night. Hand deployed the 24 foot tri-vent reserve then cut away one riser on the main. Steered the reserve into the peas with the main trailing behind. Third malfunction about jump 400, dug out my old 28 foot 7TU, jumped it and had a Mae West. This time I had a 24 foot tri-vent reserve with a pilot chute. I cut away with 2 shot capewells. That was the last time I jumped a cheapo.
  4. Back when Bill Ottley was alive, I offered to donate property at my airport for the Skydiving Museum. We are located in the center of a popular tourist region and 45 minutes from the Glenn Curtiss Museum in Hammondsport, 45 minutes from the National Soaring Museum in Elmira, 40 minutes from the Wings of Eagles Discovery Center in Horseheads and 90 minutes from the National Warplane Museum in Geneseo. We are just a small Cessna DZ, imagine what a large turbine DZ could offer, maybe even land and a hangar for the museum. If they sold the property in Fredericksburg and took the money they now have, they could build the museum. We don't need the 16M Taj Mahal with interactive displays. A clean hangar with gear, posters, videos, pictures and an old C-182 will work.
  5. When I started skydiving, I had a MK2000 AAD on my chest mounted reserve. It was an electro-mechanical device with an altitude sensor and rate of descent sensor with contacts wired in series. It was calibrated before each jump and was designed to fire at 1000 feet if the rate of descent was too high. I had a test chamber and tested it and a few others yearly. They were remarkably accurate for their design. At that time, the opening altitude for C and D license holders was 2000 feet. I was at the symposium when AirTec introduced the Cypress. When Helmut stated that the activation altitude was 750 feet, my first thought was, that is too low, it should be 1000. 750 feet is cutting it pretty close, if there is a hesitation or slow opening, there is little time to steer to a safe landing area. As for raising the opening altitude, parachutes in general seem to be taking longer to open and an extra 500 feet is just a little safety margin. It appears to me that most jumpers are opening higher than they did years ago anyway. I will be at the PIA Symposium in Dallas.