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sewyattt

Tandem Diving forover 220lbs in Kansas

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You'll need to get down to about 220 before anyone will look at you...tandem rigs have an all up weight limit, and most tandem operations won't take a passenger over 220 pounds max.

A good reason to shed some pounds though....
My computer beat me at chess, It was no match for me at kickboxing....

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1. How much over 220 are you and are u a football player built shape or out of shape and over weight.
2. What part of the state are you in?

Depending on those answers I know people who might be able to help you in KS.
you can't pay for kids schoolin' with love of skydiving! ~ Airtwardo

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stayhigh

Dz's usually turn em around after 240.

I guess all of their TI's know their own limitation and can't handle 240 or the ti is overweight himself.



In a turbine it comes down to keeping staff happy. I have taken people on tandems in the 250-260 range, but honestly... fuck that (no offense meant to the OP). It's just too hard on my body.

(I am on the lighter side so it was a legal jump)
~D
Where troubles melt like lemon drops Away above the chimney tops That's where you'll find me.
Swooping is taking one last poke at the bear before escaping it's cave - davelepka

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obelixtim


You'll need to get down to about 220 before anyone will look at you...tandem rigs have an all up weight limit, and most tandem operations won't take a passenger over 220 pounds max.

A good reason to shed some pounds though....



well to be more accurate, usually its the reserve maximum weight limit you have to worry about. Most reserves are about 500lbs total (that includes passenger TI and the rig itself). Depending on the drop zone and the limitations of the Instructors some places will take you and some won't.

My personal cut off is 260lbs. That limit is also depended on the physical condition of the individual as well. I have refused somebody 230, but took 250 later that day.

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As long as you are at least a little bit height weight proportionate you should be fine. Find a Dropzone that flies what is called a turbine aircraft. A smaller, piston driven aircraft, like a Cessna 182, is going to limit the DZ in the size of the passenger simply because the cabin is so small.

In a larger aircraft, it's no big deal taking people up to 260, and I've seen 310lbs bowling ball shaped women go without incident (not that I'd suggest it).

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When the placard on the reserve specifically states the total weight limit I wouldn't want to try explaining to a jury that the injury/fatality wasn't caused due to Instructor or DZ negligence. Even if the accident was on the main, a sharp lawyer will still argue that the injury was a direct result of negligence due to the Instructor deliberately ignoring the safety limits of the equipment. The waiver may hold up but you'll still be hit with lawyer and legal fees defending yourself. I hope you made enough money on that tandem to cover those costs!

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sewyattt

Hey,
Does anyone know of any Skydiving place in Kansas that allow tandem diving for someone that weighs about 245?



245 is not a big deal at most larger dropzones I've been to/ worked at. It's totally dependent on management and if there are "willing" staff. I've personally taken two guys in the 285 range. Both were big, lumberjack looking guys in great physical shape. At the time I weighed around 150 pounds.

What you CAN expect, if you find a place willing to accomodate you, is to pay an additional fee. Some places it's one dollar per pound over 220 (or 230); some other places there is a set fee ($25 dollars at SSM in Texas). Again: it's entirely dependent on willing staff and DZ policy. MANY places will try to accomodate "in shape" larger passengers while most WILL NOT accept "canonball" shaped, flabby, overweight customers who can't be properly fitted in the harness. I've done hundreds of tandems with guys over 230 pounds.

Chuck

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245 is only 111kg.

at 76 KG I can take up to 126 KG (277lb) and remain within the gear's limitations. I have taken this size a few times.

245 is quite normal.

I am an average sized guy so my guess is that if you got a reasonable sized dropzone with an array of staff you will be able to jump no worries.

Looking for advice on this website can be counter productive.

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Heavy people should pay more.

Just like everything else.

My Dz charges extra and we get extra for heavy weight, so everyone fights for the 240's .

"Why do we have to pay extra???"
"I much rather carry 10 lbs of shit vs 100 lbs of shit."

"Can we bring our own go pro??"
"Can you bring your own beer to the bar??"
Bernie Sanders for President 2016

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sewyattt

Hey,
Does anyone know of any Skydiving place in Kansas that allow tandem diving for someone that weighs about 245?



Weight limit at Air Capital Drop Zone is 230 lbs. Among other reasons, all of our TIs weigh in excess of 200 lbs. You can either call around (in another state) and find a somewhere that will accommodate a heavy guy, or diet.

Granted, you're not by any means "extreme" as in excess of 300 lbs. I've heard "Little girls don't play football, and huge guys don't skydive."

Martin
Experience is what you get when you thought you were going to get something else.

AC DZ

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Or the other choice would be to find another progression as a choice to the person, so that if fit and able, yet a big brick shit house kind of build, there is gear out there that can accommodate those larger built people. For example I know of one now licensed jumper who got there by doing all their student jumps on a racer tandem rig and because those at the dz were willing to think outside the standard answers given at most places.
you can't pay for kids schoolin' with love of skydiving! ~ Airtwardo

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Quote

For example I know of one now licensed jumper who got there by doing all their student jumps on a racer tandem rig and because those at the dz were willing to think outside the standard answers given at most places.



:D Yep, Using racer is quite out of the ordinary these days...

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I think this is going to start being a problem in the skydiving industry before long. The CDC estimates that 35% of all Americans are obese and we are going to see this at the dropzone in both Instructors and Students. There is already political movement to classify obesity as a disability. If that happens, you may start seeing unfit/obese students showing up expecting and demanding service under the Americans with Disibilities Act. I do believe we are still a long way from that but in this sport it's pays to be forward thinking and proactive. At the very least we need to start considering equipment changes and evaluating training protocols that take into consideration both the "super sizing " and the greying of the average student.

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stratostar

Or the other choice would be to find another progression as a choice to the person, so that if fit and able, yet a big brick shit house kind of build, there is gear out there that can accommodate those larger built people. For example I know of one now licensed jumper who got there by doing all their student jumps on a racer tandem rig and because those at the dz were willing to think outside the standard answers given at most places.



You are absolutely correct, I could invest in 23D gear with a 300 lb max suspended weight, I simply do not see it as positive cash flow situation. I have informed a potential student or two that they could put out the $6,000 plus cash for a "big boy rig" in order to train. Seems that they don't typically see this as a financially viable solution either. I'd likely also need to charge for two slots, and since the rig would be so seldom used, in order to recoup maintenance charge $100/jump rental. It simply does not work.

I'm 6' 8" tall. There are things that due to my being in the upper .001 height that I just can not do. I can't ride in many roller coasters. I can't fit in a lot of airplanes, etc. Large folks have the option of consuming less calories, and burning more. My options are limited. I think that amusement parks should design all rides in order to accommodate customers up to at least 7' in height. Think out of the box!

Edit to add:
And we should also look into letting little girls play football! Obvious discrimination!
Experience is what you get when you thought you were going to get something else.

AC DZ

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Scrumpot

Sounds to me as if it is KS area TI's, and not their prospective students/passengers, are the one's who need to be tasked with losing some #'s! :P



In a few cases, you are correct. I've also informed prospective tandem instructor candidates that they need to lose weight before I'll train them. There's one TI in kansas who weighs in the 130 lb range. For her to load to 500 lbs, would be a 325 lb student. I think that she's at 220 lb max student weight, if even that.
Experience is what you get when you thought you were going to get something else.

AC DZ

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