0
Twoply

Quitting my job and the owner's response

Recommended Posts

After over 20 years at my company, I decided to take a position somewhere else. All I wanted was more vacation time than the 2 weeks I have now, but they wouldn't budge on. And even though my work load and resposibilities dramatically increased over the last 5 years, no financial compensation is available.

I met with owner #2 to tell him I am seriously considering an offer I have on the table elsewhere. Several days later, owner #1 called me and said "I heard you're leaving us and going over to the City of ______? Well, good luck with that. Give (your replacement) a call and show him around."

Not even a hesitation or attempt to retain me by either one. I've dedicated my personal life and time tending to the big picture and all the details to make this company a success. I know my worth there now.

A few days ago, I had some doubts if I was making the right move, now I know I am.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They own a business. I assume their intention for the business is to make money. You showed that you weren't a loyal employee anymore, so they filled your job with someone else who might be loyal to the company. At least your boss wished you good luck. Everyone is replaceable.

I do wish you a sincere good luck in your new job!
She is Da Man, and you better not mess with Da Man,
because she will lay some keepdown on you faster than, well, really fast. ~Billvon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've worked at companies that would prevent you from returning to your desk, call security, take possesion of company owned property, and escortetd you out of the building the second you mentioned it.

Good luck with your new gig!
B|

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I spent 7 years in the military and when I left they hadn't even taken the time to sign/prepare my little certificate thingy that showed x years of service... No goodbye lunch or party - nothing. I was young so it was hurtful but I learned a valuable lesson: it's a job. No matter how much of yourself you put into it, they don't "owe" you anything more than your salary.

On the completely flip side, many years later, I took on a role as a consultant for a couple of months and ended up getting an extension and then being offered a permanant position. I said no and stuck with my plan to move to France and my colleagues threw me a huge party, bought me gifts, a card and all I kept thinking was that some schmuck had retired without all this fuss only the previous week... So ya know... Being popular doesn't mean you'll get a 20-year career at a place, but you might get some cake and a fun night out when you leave... Having a 20-year career doesn't mean you'll get cake and a party when you leave, but all the shit you bought for the past 20 years you got because of that company...

Just sayin'...
"There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse."
- Chris Hadfield
« Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. »
- my boss

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Twoply

Not even a hesitation or attempt to retain me by either one. I've dedicated my personal life and time tending to the big picture and all the details to make this company a success. I know my worth there now.

A few days ago, I had some doubts if I was making the right move, now I know I am.

That's not just business, but how some people act. Your previous boss doesn't seem to value his employees that much. He works on the model of "pay them just enough that they don't quit".

Every job is a $hit sandwich. If they give you enough bread, you can put up with the rest. ;):D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
normiss

I've worked at companies that would prevent you from returning to your desk, call security, take possesion of company owned property, and escortetd you out of the building the second you mentioned it.

Good luck with your new gig!
B|




I worked at freightliner in Yakima, Wa. I put in my two weeks notice and was fired immediately and told to leave the property... So I got a nice two week vacation before starting my new job :)
Roy
They say I suffer from insanity.... But I actually enjoy it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When I've been "let go" its usually a half hour before the day is over. So when I've gut I tell them a half hour before I go out the door. Never regretted it.
U only make 2 jumps: the first one for some weird reason and the last one that you lived through. The rest are just filler.
scr 316

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Twoply

After over 20 years at my company...



That was the first reason you were disappointed. You assumed ownership. Not entirely your fault. Most companies tend to promote that sort of thing . . . right up until they prove to you it's not your company.
quade -
The World's Most Boring Skydiver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have not posted on here in a very very long time, but I have to reply to this one.

14-1/2 years I've been with this company and they are closing our maintenance base. (Airline). We will close on or around July 15th. Maybe before, maybe after, you can transfer or take the layoff.

If you leave before we lock the door, you lose your severance package. (4 weeks pay, 5 years recall rights).

Basically every company has you by the balls. I was lucky to start part time doing contract maintenance for other airlines, (big pay cut, but still income). I work with guys with homes and familys' and they are stuck not knowing where to go or when to leave. Houses, children in school and all that life stuff. If they leave, they lose that generous 4 weeks of pay. If they transfer to another base, well, figure out a place to live after we tell you when you can go there.

Company's do not give a damn about you as a person. I love my job, but in reality, its just a paycheck and I have to view it as such as we are all just an employee number. No loyalty. I understand its just business, but they are screwing with alot of peoples lives. >:(

I wish you well at wherever your heading.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
normiss

I've worked at companies that would prevent you from returning to your desk, call security, take possesion of company owned property, and escortetd you out of the building the second you mentioned it.

Good luck with your new gig!
B|



Nearly all financial firms do this.

Had a friend who had his desk direct line diverted to his mobile. After "shutting him down", they closed the desk and forgot about the phone numbers; he continued to phone calls (intended for the investment bank) for the next couple years.

Tip: If you are either planning on leaving or things "look shaky" keep you desk line on divert to your mobile whenever you step away from your desk.
"Pain is the best instructor, but no one wants to attend his classes"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jackwallace

When I've been "let go" its usually a half hour before the day is over. So when I've gut I tell them a half hour before I go out the door. Never regretted it.



My most recent one was 9AM. Fuckers made me drive down there in a snow storm so they could fire me. Didn't realize exactly how much I hated that place until I left. I was hating life driving in that day, sitting in the fucking hole they had my team in and drinking the coffee that was seriously like a punishment for working there. They offered me two months salary to leave within a couple of weeks and they understood if I wanted to sleep on it a couple of days. I told him I'd sign the paperwork before he even finished the sentence.

Had a huge grin on my face driving home and spent the next couple of months skydiving when I could and looking for work. It's kind of an adjustment working for my current guys -- their people are nice, seem to actually like their jobs, have a manager who doesn't constantly undermine my work and can make changes to the system that are actually useful to their users.

I'd go back to work for the old guys in a heartbeat... for double the rate they were paying me before. I think they'll have some trouble finding the talent they need for less than that, now. Once you get a reputation, it's really hard to shake it. Most jobs are not much fun, but it's not too hard to find out who the real shit companies are. One of the local Satellite TV companies here had to spin off their IT division because no one would work for them. Now the spun-off company has the same reputation, must be time for another spinoff!
I'm trying to teach myself how to set things on fire with my mind. Hey... is it hot in here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Seems like the really dedicated employees tend to care more for the company than the company cares for them. It's rare for companys to take the opposite view and sadly way too many employees are disillusion. I was lucky to work for two large corporations that did treat their employees very well, but that is probably unusual today.
Dano

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
danornan

I was lucky to work for two large corporations that did treat their employees very well, but that is probably unusual today.

Practically all of today's companies seem to have their eye focused on return-on-investment, the bottom line. Any wage, any benefit, any pension that can be cut will be to improve that. I appreciate they are trying to maximize returns for the stockholders in a competitive world, but maybe that's where unions come in.

Look at the history of coal mining and union activism as an extreme illustration of what's going on, in reverse, today.

Southwest Airline's business model was slash pilot pay, promise no pensions, allow no unions, and fill those seats quick and cheap. That business model has swept thru the domestic carriers like a firestorm. The majors reorganized under Chapter 11, slashed all the pay, stole all the pension money, and are doing quite well now. The pilots? Not like they used too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
amstalder

You guys are making me really nervous for if Patrick ever leaves the military [:/] (not that he's necessarily treated any better, it's just a familiar type of crap).

At least they still give you a pension at 20 years. Police and firefighters have a similar program. In fact, it seems only the union govt. jobs have that kind of thing anymore. [:/]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnMitchell

*** I was lucky to work for two large corporations that did treat their employees very well, but that is probably unusual today.

Practically all of today's companies seem to have their eye focused on return-on-investment, the bottom line. Any wage, any benefit, any pension that can be cut will be to improve that. I appreciate they are trying to maximize returns for the stockholders in a competitive world, but maybe that's where unions come in.

Look at the history of coal mining and union activism as an extreme illustration of what's going on, in reverse, today.

Southwest Airline's business model was slash pilot pay, promise no pensions, allow no unions, and fill those seats quick and cheap. That business model has swept thru the domestic carriers like a firestorm. The majors reorganized under Chapter 11, slashed all the pay, stole all the pension money, and are doing quite well now. The pilots? Not like they used too.

That role has almost reversed itself since deregulation. Southwest now probably does more for its pilot group than any airline, and the pilots do the same for the airline. They are also represented by a union, and with profit sharing are usually the highest paid pilots in the industry for the aircraft they operate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
theplummeter



That role has almost reversed itself since deregulation. Southwest now probably does more for its pilot group than any airline, and the pilots do the same for the airline. They are also represented by a union, and with profit sharing are usually the highest paid pilots in the industry for the aircraft they operate.

Is that right? I remember years back riding with the SWA crews and they would complain about being the lowest paid 737 pilots in the industry. I guess everyone's pay has dropped to meet theirs.

They are also some of the most productive, and I'm not surprised Herb has a profit sharing program for them. He's always been a man willing to cut a deal.

Profit sharing is great, so are 401Ks. I'll take a guaranteed pension any day though. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnMitchell

***You guys are making me really nervous for if Patrick ever leaves the military [:/] (not that he's necessarily treated any better, it's just a familiar type of crap).

At least they still give you a pension at 20 years. Police and firefighters have a similar program. In fact, it seems only the union govt. jobs have that kind of thing anymore. [:/]

Local governments like the one I work for give a retirement at 30 years, if you last that long. I'm at 2.61 years and seriously debating jumping ship...
"I may be a dirty pirate hooker...but I'm not about to go stand on the corner." iluvtofly
DPH -7, TDS 578, Muff 5153, SCR 14890
I'm an asshole, and I approve this message

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
theonlyski


Local governments like the one I work for give a retirement at 30 years, if you last that long. I'm at 2.61 years and seriously debating jumping ship...

I was air traffic control with the FAA. It was 20 years and age 50 or 25 years, any age. Our son hired on at age 20, and can retire at age 45 with full benefits. Of course, the longer you work, the higher the monthly pension goes.


I worked almost 30 and loved it. They forced me out with mandatory retirement. :D

Sorry you're hating your job. [:/]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnMitchell

***
Local governments like the one I work for give a retirement at 30 years, if you last that long. I'm at 2.61 years and seriously debating jumping ship...

I was air traffic control with the FAA. It was 20 years and age 50 or 25 years, any age. Our son hired on at age 20, and can retire at age 45 with full benefits. Of course, the longer you work, the higher the monthly pension goes.


I worked almost 30 and loved it. They forced me out with mandatory retirement. :D

Sorry you're hating your job. [:/]

Defined Benefit plans are a "gravy train" and this is probably the last generation to see them. Whether you wish to believe or not, I doubt anyone joining on now will see a DB plan; in brief the math doesn't stack up. All will eventually be some form of Defined Contribution (DC) plan.
"Pain is the best instructor, but no one wants to attend his classes"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In my opinion, the moment you say you're leaving they know you're looking to go one way or another, so even if they offer something to retain you to keep things flowing in the short term, they're probably going to start looking for your cheaper replacement anyway.
cavete terrae.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

0