Nataly

Members
  • Content

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Community Reputation

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Gear

  • Main Canopy Size
    135
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    150
  • AAD
    Cypres

Jump Profile

  • Home DZ
    none
  • License
    C
  • License Number
    41225
  • Licensing Organization
    USPA
  • Number of Jumps
    300
  • Years in Sport
    11
  • First Choice Discipline
    Formation Skydiving
  • Second Choice Discipline
    Freeflying

Ratings and Rigging

  • USPA Coach
    Yes

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  1. Unfortunately, a skydiving forum is not the best place to get medical advice... Problem is, doctors are not the best people to give you skydiving advice... My father has has 2 pneumothoraxes in this life... My brother had one when he was at university and I did when I was 16. When I had mine, little was known about causes, but they did know it was more frequent among young, slender, athletic people and that some people seemed genetically predisposed to it. I was told there was little evidence to correlate smoking and a pneumothorax (my dad a heavy smoker - my brother and I non-smokers and very healthy). I wasn't given any tips to prevent it from happening again - I was just told to try to get to the hospital more quickly if it did. My dad told me that on both occasions, he was not doing anything physical/strenuous to trigger it... My brother was playing volley-ball when he had his (although not pushing any harder than usual) and I was peddling along on a bicycle (also not something I consider strenuous). My brother and I are both very sporty and have never (yet) had a second one. He is 37 and I turn 36 in a month... If possible, perhaps seek several opinions from the medical community. You may not find anyone who actually understands skydiving, however, so take their opinions (because they are opinions unless backed up by actual scientific research) with an appropriate dose of salt. Take any advice on here with a double dose of salt!!! "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss
  2. Maybe you got turned away because instead of listening to your instructor (who probably told you to relax, arch, et cetera) you insisted on blaming your shoulder injury?? Just a thought... "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss
  3. Bump. 10 years... RIP Pete. "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss
  4. Back about ten years ago I went from a very small DZ to ZHills and it was a wonderful experience. It was also a great experience to visit other DZ's in Florida (including Deland) because they are not retardedly far from one another and each one has it's unique vibe, et cetera. Not only this but each dropzone tends to be particularly good at certain disciplines and this depends a lot on who is there and what the landscape is like, et cetera. Some will have great swoopers and others will have particularly skilled belly fliers and others are more free-fly-friendly and some have fantastic canopy people et cetera et cetera. and since no two dropzones are exactly the same, the vibe and culture also varies quite a lot from place to place - some will suit you better than others (some dz's have more "fun" jumpers and some have more team-oriented/"serious" fliers)... Some are really in the middle of nowhere so there is no night-life outside the dz (but a rather active bonfire to compensate!!)... Looks like you may not have time to go anywhere other than Deland (which was and aparently still is an amazing DZ)... So my advice would be: start saving up for a longer trip to FL!!!!! Oh, and ask the local people where is best to stay before you book your accommodations... Some hotels can be real dumps and not so handy for getting to the dz. Some people rent out their trailors, et cetera so worth asking around (in my opinion). "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss
  5. You can't have been lurking for that long - this is a recurring theme on dizzy.com!!! Do a bit of a search, especially in the women's forum. For some reason these oft end up there... If nothing else you will see you are not alone... "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss
  6. We so easily forget what a nice place this is to post, thanks to the efforts of mods. Thanks to DSE and to all the mods for their hard work and dedication.
  7. +1 on renting a trailer from Pip and Judy. Or buying/bringing a tent. Or asking around - there are people who have a spare couch or trailer or van with a mattress. I have tried all options other than a hotel at ZHills - an absolutely fantastic place, you won't want to leave, whatever you choose
  8. The fact that we jump in the first place is uncommon, but I'm not convinced we as people are so different... People like to feel special... And saying "I jump out of planes" makes a lot of people feel special. A small subset of skydivers really are different, just like a small subset of *any* group would be. "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss
  9. Closest place is Le Luc (head toward Marseille on the A8 - just over an hour from Nice). Alternatively, from Roquebrune Cap Martin (5 minutes from Monaco) you can do tandem paragliding. "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss
  10. I recently got my C-licence although I could have gotten it a loooooong time ago (I took a long break from jumping). I thought it was useful to review the PIM and do the exam. Having jumped at many different dropzones, I find a B-Licence is a useful thing to have... If nothing else, it gives people a reference about what your theoretical level/knowledge is. Getting the C-Licence?? Not necessary, in my opinion, but again it signals to people that you have a certain level. You may suck way more that the guy who never got any licence at all, but at least when you go somewhere new, people will pretty much trust that you are reasonably safe and leave you alone. If you keep fucking up, though, it doesn't matter what licence you have, people will notice. "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss
  11. I recently travelled from Nice to Barcelona and had my rig as a carry-on. I assumed (rightly or wrongly) that the airport security people in Nice would not be used to seeing a rig, so I did my best to avoid any hassle. Had the rig in a discreet bag with nothing else in it... I had my AAD xray card, and a letter I found on the FFP website explicitely stating that travelling with a personal parachute does not pose a security risk (I'm paraphrasing, but here is the link: http://www.ffp.asso.fr/voyager-en-avion-avec-un-parachute/). I believe the USPA and BPA have similar documents you can print out. I arrived VERY early. You know what? The guy sitting in front of the xray machine was chatting with his colleague... Seemed to me like my bag went through and he didn't so much as glance at his screen! Happy days!! I prefer to be cautious, though, because I've seen and heard all sorts when it comes to travelling... I once was forced to check in my motorcycle helmet... Quite randomly, under the pretext that it could be used as a "weapon". Seriously. BTW, yes, you absolutely are allowed to bring your helmet in your carry-on. My personal experience/assumption is that if they feel like being a twat, they can pretty much do what they want. You can protest, but you can also miss your flight... Better to cooperate and stay cool. Most of the time, they are actually just doing their job and they simply don't know what they are looking at. Thank goodness they take the time to properly screen if in doubt... What a waste of time and money if all that security were just for show!! "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss
  12. Other. - Chicken arms. Wait. I still do that! D'oh. "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss
  13. Is buying used a gamble? Not really. It's like anything... Keep an eye open and eventually you will find what you want. I got my rig from a guy who bought new, put less than 20 jumps on it and decided skydiving wasn't for him. Which is not so surprising... A first rig is something a lot of people want to move on from quickly (either to downsize or even to quit the sport) - so "almost-new" (and much less expensive) beginner gear is not all that hard to find unless you're feakishly tall/short/fat/skinny. In my case it was an awesome deal because the guy didn't care about money - he just wanted the rig to have a happy new owner
  14. For me, I had a lot of reasons for wanting something smaller - not all of them good reasons... One big problem I had as a light jumper was being at the mercy of the winds and not being able to control my big student canopy. On almost every jump I was landing backwards and then once on the ground I would get dragged back by the canopy... I also had an extremely hard time flaring... Riser turns?? Forget it - I lifted *myself* up, rather than pulling down the risers... Not to mention the rental rigs were big. I was scared to fall out of it!! Maybe an unreasonable fear, but nonetheless, I felt uncomfortable with the equipment. I went too small, but I did need to downsize in order to get a reasonable amount of control when flying my canopy. Aside from this, I will not deny that "peer pressure" is out there to get something smaller... As a newby, it's easy to get tempted. The same way it's tempting to get a more powerful bike when everyone makes fun of your dinky little 250cc. The same way when you're new to running you get sucked into the excitement of everyone around you in a race and forget to pace yourself and run WAAAAY faster than you ought to. It's easy to get ahead of yourself... As you are not susceptible to peer-pressure and not interested in swooping, down-sizing has very little interest. Because like you said: the purpose of your canopy is to land your ass safely. Some people use their canopy for more than that (like trying to prove they have testicles). "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss
  15. At just over 20 jumps, I bought myself a Sabre1 135. I weighed less than 100 lbs at the time because I had been quite ill and lost a bunch of weight. The rig was a tad on the large side, even. On the whole, it seemed a reasonable idea until I started playing around under canopy. Fuck me, it scared me senseless. Over the years, I have gained and lost weight again, and all I can say to someone is this... Good work for losing the weight, but DO NOT base your canopy size on a weight that is not your "natural" (or sustainable) weight. Like many have said, I can personally attest to the FACT that a 135 is very responsive at any wingloading. Even more so when you gain back the weight you lost. And it goes without saying that you may one day end up gaining MORE weight than you lost. Do yourself a favour: base your decision on your skill level, not your diet achievements. I was very lucky - many have been a lot less lucky. "There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse." - Chris Hadfield « Sors le martinet et flagelle toi indigne contrôleuse de gestion. » - my boss