Ronaldo

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Everything posted by Ronaldo

  1. Make sure the pin flap passes through the sleeve under the pin cover flap before the reserve container is closed. If it does not, the pin cover flap will open every time the main is deployed. I've seen this happen a couple of times here in Brazil with reserve packers that are not familiar with the Wings. Enjoy your rig! Edited to correct information underlined. The packers in this case were not FAA riggers. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  2. Depending on canopy characteristics and line trim I don't think there is a packing method that will solve the problem. If you are willing to spend around $150 and intend to keep the canopy for a while I suggest the H-mod. It will improve performance and slow down openings as side effect. Skyworks does that also. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  3. As already mentioned try to get a power tool (or packboy). It will help you a lot specially if you like to keep the closing loop slightly tight (which is my preference). Another tip is to kneel on the bag while closing the bottom flap to remove as much air as possible. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  4. I wouldn’t recommend a Voodoo to you only because of one particularity: Voodoos are well known for having a very narrow range of canopy sizes. In other words it looks good only with the canopies it was sized for. If you order a V4 now to fit your 170 then when you decide to downsize to a 150 the rig will most probably look weird and wrinkled. To have that nice curved shape design the container must have the internal volume precisely filled. Since you’re starting now you may end up downsizing quickly and getting disappointed with your choice. Check the Voodoo again when you have reached the canopy size you’ll be using for the major part of your skydiving career. If you want to stick with RI I would suggest you check the Talon FS and FX as both share the same Voodoo harness and are also freefly friendly. Contact Kit Sanders at RI, he was extremely supportive and honest even confirming this volume limitation for me. Have fun! Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  5. If you’re not buying a high performance canopy then Dacron may be a good option. Spectra (Microline) is thinner and presents less drag but it transmits more opening shock and loses a lot of trim. Dacron is more dimensionally stable and also more “elastic”. For high performance canopies IMHO Vectran and HMA are the best lines (unless you’re planning to jump a totally out of trim canopy for a long time). Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  6. If you already bought the rig check if you can fit an Optimum 143 on it. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  7. Are you using a RW suit? I’m asking this because a few years ago I bought a brand new RW suit to start a BBF. I began to experience the same problem as soon as I started jumping the suit. At first I noticed that the canopy was turning on every jump then I saw that the straps were uneven. The suit was snug and the material was very slippery. When I switched back to the freefly suit the problem disappeared. I’m not saying that this is normal so please check with Sunrise. I’m on my second Wings (custom made) and this one has the webbing so tight that it takes a lot of effort to fasten or to loosen the leg straps. BTW, both have stainless steel adapters which are supposed to slip easier. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  8. Try to get a used Triathlon or Spectre or even Sabre1 (there are ways to fix the openings). You'll probably find used canopies like these really cheap. For now save the money to jump! Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  9. Absolutely right, thanks. Actually, I have never waited for a loop to break before replacing. When it looks too fuzzy…it’s gone. I was too lazy to write the full sentence and ended up passing the wrong message. Another thing I should add is to take care when storing the excess loop. I usually tie one or two other knots to reduce length and insert it behind the grommet. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  10. In case you want to try, I made a few closing loops with double ends. You’ll need only a longer piece of line and the same fid or wire tool. Finger trap a loop on both sides and lock them in place using Jump Shack’s sew less technique (see link). Make sure you respect the dimensions on the instructions. Tie a knot at the same length you would do with a standard closing loop. You can actually tie 2 knots at the same distance from both ends. Install in the rig. If the loop breaks, just flip the washer to the other side and you have a new loop right in hand and ready to be used (no need to run to your bag to look for another one). I would post a picture but the rig is packed right now. http://www.sidsrigging.com/articles/stitchless_fingertrap.htm Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  11. I just wanted to give him another option which would lead to the same result (safely attaching a toggle), but you are right, I should have suggested he asked a rigger to teach him how to do it. A rigger can explain this as easily as tying a knot. Although it requires a fid or similar tool I don’t think it is a specialized task. It just requires some teaching and patience just like packing for example (which is way more complex though). If I can attach a toggle this way in less than 5 minutes it can’t be difficult at all Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  12. Make the loop using a fingertrap tool and lock it using Jump Shack's sewless method. This is how I attach brake lines in any canopy. Have a rigger to check once you've done. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  13. Not a master by any means (I'm still learning too) but you're right about opening your legs, they are too close. You may also straighten your torso a bit more since the wind is hitting your back causing you to move forward. Another suggestion is to avoid insisting in keeping HD if you're sliding fast. Go back to the sit position and try again. I believe it is better to make many quick transitions than trying to force the position through the entire jump. Nice jump, congrats! Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  14. You may ask a rigger to make you a new (identical) slider. Cut a small hole on its center (with a hot knife) and see how it behaves. Make the hole progressively larger until you reach the desired opening speed. Keep the original slider so you don't lose resale value. IMO you'll find annoying to change sliders every weekend (assuming you won't change disciplines in the same day which would be just insane). I really suggest you get a cheap used 7 cell like a Thriatlon and order a new set of risers, main bag and PC. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  15. Carbon fiber has a much higher strength-to-weight ratio and the manufacturing process is way more complex (involves application of high pressure and temperature). Fiberglass is a much simpler material to work and also much cheaper. If you had the time and patience you could design and make your own fiberglass helmet (I made mine) as it requires only simple tools. Carbon fiber demands specific and expensive equipment thus you should expect higher prices in helmets made with it. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  16. These helmets are made in Brazil by a friend of mine (Paulo Marques). Check his website: http://www.skylinecapacetes.com.br/index.html His helmets are made of fiberglass (no carbon fiber). Paulo (Paulinho) is a great guy and I totally recommend him. The Skyline dealer in US is Marcos Vinicius ([email protected]) Safe skies Ronaldo Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  17. Congrats! It took me dozen of jumps to do something that resembled a sit fly. Once you’ve learned you will wonder why it took so long. Just one note: when learning the basics of freefly stick with 2-way, even if you jump with a coach. The other guy in the jump was very far but he could have been floating above you creating a risk of collision. Actually, I recommend you only jump with a coach at this stage. Although you’ll jump less, your learning curve will be much faster and you won’t develop bad habits that may take even more jumps to get fixed. Never lose eye contact with a jump partner, especially if he is not proficient enough. Believe me, I almost got myself killed in a freefall/ canopy collision. Luckily I was able to survive and learn with the experience. Enjoy your training jumps! Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  18. Didn't I tell you? Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  19. http://www.skydivingmovies.com/ver2/pafiledb.php?action=file&id=6886&string=packing You can't go wrong with this one Safe skies Ronaldo Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  20. Have someone to video your landings and show it to an experienced canopy pilot. You can also post a link to the video here and it will be much easier to help. You can’t even imagine how seeing yourself on video helps. I did a canopy piloting course with Luigi Cani recently and he was able to see many things I was not aware of (such as my brake lines being slightly short for riser turns). My piloting skills improved dramatically. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  21. Maybe it is, especially if you’re not rolling both sides equally. What you want with the packing is to allow the center cell to inflate first which will help the canopy to stay on heading. What I usually do is to pull the center cell slightly to the front and fold the outer cells in (I have an H-moded Cobalt that opens like butter 100% of the time). Modern canopies usually open soft and should not require rolling the nose or other tricks. Honestly, I never felt like rolling the nose made much difference (at least for the Sabre 150 I had) This is what works for me
  22. You should not roll the nose on a Safire. Rolling the tail shouldn't be an issue (unless you roll to the point of getting a line over). Leave the center cell in the front and just fold in (don't roll) the outer cells, this will give heading to the canopy. If it doesn't work I suggest you have someone else to pack and jump it again, this will eliminate one variable. Also, how does it behave once opened? Does it turn in full flight? Is the lineset microline or vectran? How many jumps on it? Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  23. This is a really easy modification to make, send it to any rigger. If you had the material and sewing skills you could do it yourself. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  24. I know what you mean, the only thing that scared me more than my first balloon jump was my first BASE. I think the wind and the noise of the plane confuse your senses. In a balloon everything is so quiet you can hear your brain scream NO Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  25. The main bag will possibly hit your feet causing it to spin, probably giving you really nice line twists. You body will rotate a higher angle than in a conventional ws deployment which can increase the forces applied to your body. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted