Ronaldo

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Everything posted by Ronaldo

  1. Used it for the first time last week. Got a nice tip from a friend: after deployment I tilt the camera down (while looking at traffic) to get a nice angle for canopy flight and landing. I’m planning to attach one to the back of the helmet for wingsuit angles. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  2. Use the rubber adapter that comes with the camera. Mount the camera then stuff it inside the gap between the support and foot mount. It is supposed to prevent the mount from releasing when impacted. PS - I agree with the above post, if you do have 172 jumps you should wait a little bit until flying camera (even a compact one) Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  3. Try these 2 checks: Grab the pilot chute (coked) by the bridle and check if the apex (where the hackey handle is attached) is below the skirt (the edge of the zp fabric). This will tell you if the kill line is long enough to allow the PC to inflate properly. Check if the reinforcement tape is sewn at the bias of the mesh. If it is not the PC will inflate assimetrically (distorted) and spill much air loosing its efficiency. If it was a "home made" PC it could be the case. Learned this from an old post from Bill Booth here at DZ.com Thanks for sharing the experience Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  4. If you have access to a domestic sewing machine you can make one easily (and cheap). Get some tips on how to deploy with an experience freeflyer and don’t be afraid to let it go if things get scary. Here is a link to the pictures of the one I made. http://www.dropzone.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?post=3360968;search_string=tube%20PVC;#3360968 Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  5. Things to make you proud of yourself: Main canopy: - sweet openings and flight - Vectran lineset which means it will keep its performance and opening characteristics through its lifespan Container: - One of the best benefit/cost ratios on the market IMO - Custom sized so it will be comfortable and (most important) safe Reserve: - Along with PD one with the highest maximum weight limits and one of the best on the market Overall: great acquisition! Congratulations and have fun!
  6. I believe it is more due to the taper of the trailing edge. In fact I would expect all USL to be different but it looks like PD opted to keep UST1-3 equal and UST5 slightly longer. I guess this is another example of the performanceXsimplicity choice. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  7. That was one of my suppositions also (simplicity). Maybe test jumping showed that performance gains were not worth manufacturing complexity. Another valid point is that equal lines also make line trim checks easier Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  8. Hi John, Nice thought, it makes total sense to me. I guess giving a preferred direction for the air to flow might avoid fluttering of the tail. In a rigid wing it wouldn't be an issue but in a parachute the ramdom air spills might create alternated tensions (compression/traction) on the tail thus causing flutter. Thanks for the round parachute info Ronaldo Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  9. Just made a drawing showing how I imagine tail deflections are with equal and proportional USL. The difference is not huge but visible My first impression would be that the proportional lines would lead to a better flare simply by “cupping” more air. Obviously this is a simplified 2D representation of a 3D deflection so there may be many other factors that I’m not taking into account. The canopy is in a close scale to a Tri 160 Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  10. Does anybody know why rectangular canopies have all upper steering lines of the same length? Since the center of canopy’s arc is on the links (actually it has 2 centers) and the USL are cascaded at a considerable distance from the links I would expect them to have different lengths in order to maintain the same arc as the canopy. As far as I can see having the same length results in a distorted deflection of the tail which can be noticed during flare. The outer lines get pulled first which results in a very curved trailing edge. I can only speculate reasons for that like (but in the end I don’t have a clue ): - Reduce toggle pressure by progressively deflecting the tail? - Simplicity of construction and packing? - Better stall characteristics? - ? Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  11. It may sound like a stupid question but are you sure you’re pulling both drawstrings of your slider all the way up to the lockers (stops)? That is the only way I can see for the slider to uncollapse Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  12. brain fart on previous post: where it says "slow the openings" please read "speed up" Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  13. I believe that pulling the rears carefully as suggested is the easiest solution. I have a 150 H-moded Cobalt that can snivel forever if left packed for a week or more. Knowing how to control the canopy immediately after opening with rears also helps to stop any dive or turn and is a great skill to learn. If you really want to slow the openings with consistency and don’t mind spending a little bit, have a rigger to copy the original slider and cut a small hole on its center. Progressively increase the diameter until you reach the perfect opening for you. Keep the original slider so you don’t lose resale value of the canopy. Have a rigger to assist you through the process of cutting and testing Have fun! Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  14. Your method will surely work. Just remember that the top will be dense (not hollow) and this will add a little bit of weight to your helmet. I work with polyester resin (much cheaper) which comes usually thick but I adjust its viscosity with styrene solvent depending on the application. I buy the fiberglass material from a local supplier but it should be very similar to these ones: http://www.shopmaninc.com/polyesters.html Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  15. There are probably dozens of ways to do it depending on the materials and tools you have in hand. Here is one suggestion: 1. Get an aluminum plate at the size you want the flat top to be (obviously larger than cookie’s quick plate); 2. Remove the lining inside the helmet 3. Drill 3 holes on the plate and also at the top of the helmet (you will have to estimate the best position in both). See figure 1 4. Sand the top of your helmet to improve bonding. 5. Mark the area below the plate and drill a bunch of small holes inside it 6. Fix the plate on the helmet using bolts/nuts/ washers (figure 1) 7. Install the camera temporarily on the plate using rubber bands, duct tape or whatever you got (just don’t damage it!) 8. Tricky part: find the best alignment of the camera. Place a mark on a wall approximately at your eye’s height. Put your helmet on (with the camera), look to the mark (with your head and not only with your eyes) and record video. Make adjustments with the 2 rear bolts until the mark is in the center of the screen. 9. Once the proper alignment is reached, remove the camera and cut 3 pieces of rigid cardboard, balsa sheet or any other material that is stiff enough to stand handling and resin later (see figure 2). Cut the cardboard as accurately as possible (this may take a few tries). The more time you spend here the less you will have to trim and sand later. 10. Attach these pieces using strong duct tape (i.e silver tape). Make sure all the edges are sealed otherwise you may end up with a lot of mess to fix. Put tape inside the helmet covering all the holes. 11. Position the helmet as shown in figure 3 and fill the cavity with epoxy or polyester resin (sorry, I can’t help you with brands in Canada). 12. Once it has cured, remove the cardboard, sand and paint. You should be able to remove the bolts/ nuts applying a little torque. Tip: If you want to reduce weight you may wax the bottom of the aluminum plate before starting and detach it once the resin is cured. This may seem a lot of work at first but requires only very basic materials. You may change this process a little bit depending on your creativity Post a picture later Have fun! Ronaldo Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  16. Hi, First, would it be possible for you to post a picture of the helmet/ cookie base together? It will be easier to visualize a solution. Also, are you willing to paint the helmet? Would you mind if the base doesn't match helmet color? BTW, I did a master mold for a few reasons: - It would be much more difficult to finish the sides (trim the edges) of the flat top base right on top of the helmet. - With the master mold I was able to make a perfectly flat top part. It was not shown at the presentation but the part was molded against a flat wood block (although glass would have been the perfect choice) - At that time I was planing to do a full face version of the same helmet (which I did but never finished). Have fun with your project!
  17. Man, that was really a lousy idea! Try washing the rig (let it soak in Woolite for 1 day) and scrub (carefully) with a slightly stiff bristle brush. Test on the pin closing flap first because it is the easier one to replace Another option (probably the best one) would be to disassemble the whole thing and send to Mirage Good luck Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  18. A-W-E-S-O-M-E!!! Your buddy is really talented Congrats Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  19. jtval I noticed your main and reserve have very similar colors. Many years ago an AFF instructor at my DZ had a premature reserve deployment at King Air’s door. His reserve wrapped around the stabilizer and he cutaway his main as a reflex. I don’t know if the colors were similar but it is definitely one reason to have very distinct canopies. Another obvious reason is in a two-out situation. You have much more experience than me and have probably evaluated this issue so please don’t take this as criticism Safe skies Ronaldo Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  20. Ditto. Even when using a hired packer, know how to bring the canopy in, set your brakes, walk the lines, uncollapse your slider and PC. This way you guarantee that 80% of the pack job is correct, not to mention that you will gain respect from your packer. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  21. No, 1 piece suit. I already have ff pants but it is a nice option specially on hot days Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  22. I bought a Firefly suit in July and I'm really enjoying it. It was custom made and fits perfectly. Very good quality compared to other suits I have seen (I haven’t seen all). I'd recommend an inside pocket (for cell phone) in case it is not standard. Safe skies Ronaldo Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  23. Really nice job Rick! There is nothing like the feeling of building your own toys. Here is the link for the step by step process of my current camera helmet. I believe I never posted it in this thread http://cid-b5905376ce73cf21.skydrive.live.com/play.aspx/Capacete%20freefly%20%5E5Free%20Fly%20camera%20helmet%5E6?ref=1 BTW, there is a new Project coming soon for a CX100, almost entirely from scratch! I wish I had more space to work at home Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  24. Awesome shots Dave, congratulations Ronaldo Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  25. If the slider is coming down to the risers it makes sense, specially if you consider that the canopy certainly uses stainless steel grommets (because of the Vectran lines). Steel has a higher specific heat which means it holds its temperature for a longer time. Of course only a more detailed study would be able confirm this. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted