Ronaldo

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Everything posted by Ronaldo

  1. If you don't mind spending $150, get the H-mod done on it. It will improve your openings and probably add resale value. Much more cosmetic pleasing than a pocket slider. You can contact MEL at Skyworks Rigging and explain your problem. Safe skies Ronaldo Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  2. I have bought skydiving gear through the net many times. I have used the DZ.com classifieds a couple of times and had problems every time I tried to deal directly with the seller. I gave up with this method and started buying directly from skydive stores (100% satisfaction). Recently, I decided to buy 2 items from DZ.com users but this time I used a respectable skydive dealer as a broker. The user sent the gear to the store and it was inspected by a rigger. After a quick confirmation from the dealer about the overall condition I authorized him to charge my credit card and he sent a check to the owner. Clean, fast and safe deal, everybody was happy. Unfortunately, you can`t trust people sometimes Good luck Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  3. I made riser locks for my last rig and used them for a while with success. Today I repeated the process for my new rig and took a few pictures. These locks are not as effective as the ball/ bungee or Velcro because they don’t hold the center of the slider thus it still flaps and catches air a bit but at least stays down. I made them with 2 pieces of ¾ webbing. To use them I simply collapse the slider, pull the rear grommets first then the front ones. Very simple and safe (you’re not connected to the canopy anywhere besides the three ring). 1. Cut 2 pieces of webbing approximately 2 3/8 with a hot knife 2. Fold the webbing as shown (I locked it with a straight stitch for easy handling) 3. Draw a line 2”from the confluence point (this is the position that worked best for me) 4. Sew with two zig zag stitches (I locked it in place with a straight stitch before sewing to the riser and removed the stitch later) Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  4. I bought one used container with him (V3). The rig matched exactly the description he gave me and it was fast delivered. Good service, no complaints. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  5. Not nearly as complex as yours. No shading, only solid colors but I really liked the result against the black background. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  6. I have a clean and easier solution for you. Remove the line from cats eye to toggle. Get some 1000lbs Microline and fingertrap it to the catseye. Lock it using Jump Shack’s sewless method. Mark the position you want the toggle to be (I suggest you use Cobalt’s trim chart) and make another loop sized only enough for the toggle to go through. Lock this loop again using the sewless method. Insert the toggles and jump! I made my entire brake line using this method. There is not a single bartack or zigzag on it, from cascade to toggle. You can readjust the line whenever you want just by undoing the knot (check Jump Shack’s instructions). I'll take a picture later for you. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  7. Hi phoenixlpr, This method is similar to the one I used on my Wings risers but would not work on infinity risers because they don’t have elastic keepers. I doubt it would be possible to insert toggle and lines in the pocket. Blue skies Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  8. Looks good too, I'll try that also unless Kelly (VS) has something against it. Thanks Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  9. You may ask a rigger to make an extension and larks-head it to the ring and bridle (removing the rapid link). This is the setup I have in my rig. It increases the distance between bag and canopy a bit but works fine. One of the loops of the extension must be large enough to pass bag and PC through. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  10. I'll try that also, thanks! I was folding it in half which didn't hold much. I think I'll insert the excess line from bottom to top to prevent the wind from removing it during opening. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  11. Just tried this method inspired on the trulok risers, is it acceptable? Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  12. Hi, What is the correct method of stowing the excess steering line on Infinity risers? I could not find this information on the manual. I tried to use the loop on the back but it is too lose and does not hold the lines during opening. PS - I could have asked this directly to the manufacturer but I know he posts here and this info may be usefull to others. Thank you all Ronaldo Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  13. Roy at R&T is a kick ass dealer but you may also want to check Marcelo Peragallo at Skydive TSO (http://www.tso-d.com/). Both will get you amazing deals not to mention the best customer service. Good luck Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  14. When a friend here buys a new (to him) canopy I usually recommend that he deploys it at a higher altitude and spend some time checking the brake line length as follows: First, make sure there is a bow at the steering lines which indicates that the canopy is achieving its full flight speed. Second, slowly pull the brakes and check how much input is required to start tail deflection. Estimate this amount using the risers as a ruler. Third, pull both toggles slowly to full arm extension and see if the canopy comes to a stall. Recovery must be to ¾ brakes. As most of them are flying larger canopies (not swoopers) I usually tell them to adjust the steering lines so the canopy reaches a stall after 3s or more (tail should not show deflection with toggles up). For average people with larger canopies the stall is usually never reached. This adjustment must be checked periodically as the line shrinks (microline). The majority of people I see here simply think that factory settings are universal or calibrated for everybody. People have different arm lengths and objectives regarding canopy flight. Sorry, 100 jumps pounding is just too much for me. Amazing that no one saw something was wrong and helped him. Safe skies Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  15. Didn’t know about Spectres being set short from factory, thank you. I think I projected my reality to answer this, sorry. I Jump in Brazil and I can guarantee you that this line check is extremely rare here. Most people here tend put hundreds of jumps in microline canopies completely ignoring the effects of trim changes. Unfortunately, we have very few FAA riggers in the country and plenty of small Cessna DZs where people jump gear that is not always in the best condition. Regarding factory settings I can guarantee you that in the majority of the cases when someone here buys a new canopy the toggles are placed at the factory default mark and stay there until reline. Unfortunately, very few people can read English and this leads to lack of information. I do check my lines and adjust them when necessary but I also inspect and assemble my gear and pack my reserve. I’m a mechanical engineer and I can read English well so this helps me to have access to the latest information. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  16. That's very vey rare. Most canopies have their brakelines set too short (can't use frontrisers without breaking at the same time) or even way too short (canopy is in slight brake all the time). If you’re talking about the majority of canopies with hundreds of jumps then I totally agree with you. New canopies as far as I know usually come with longer brake lines to prevent the user from stalling the wing and also to compensate for the shrinkage that will occur in the first hundred jumps. I may be wrong though, wouldn’t be the first time Eh, no. You just have to flare all the way. A lot of people do not. Sure, but I’m assuming same user and same technique thus no effect in the comparison Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  17. Did you check your brake line length? Most people switch canopies (usually putting only a couple of jumps in each) and get false comparisons. To really compare both canopies you have to make sure that both are in trim and have equivalent brake line lengths. Your Spectre may have the brake line set too long which doesn't allow you to use all the flare power. The smaller one may be more suited to your arm’s length thus giving you a better flare. Assuming the set up is equivalent, a smaller canopy will fly faster and will require less toggle input to level off during the flare. This is why it is usually easier to land a smaller wing. Landing a large wing perfectly in a straight in approach usually takes a more precise timing for the flare but mistakes in this case will most likely only get your suit dirty. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  18. Improvise, make it cheap and let it go (I strongly suggest you don’t deploy holding it). I made my own tube last year to celebrate my birthday with a special jump. I almost got myself killed but it was nothing related with the tube. Here are a couple of pictures of the construction. I made it with a water PVC pipe, cheap and light fabric, nylon cord and pieces of webbing. To make the ring I divided the pipe in equal segments and bent it on a flame. You first must decide what will be the ring diameter and then cut the length accordingly. If you make it cheap and simple you won’t be afraid to lose it. Handle was made with a piece of the same PVC pipe Have a nice jump! Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  19. I've this happen a few times, in fact I had a X-fire with problem. Icarus fixed it trimming the lines of the other side. A friend of mine had the same issue with a brand new Pilot 150, Aerodyne replaced his canopy, great service. Dan Pointer's Parachute Manual also gives some info about this issue. If the lines are symmetric and you're wearing your harness correctly (also symmetrically) then it’s a problem with canopy construction. The panels in one side could have been sewn slightly out of bias and so the canopy inflates asymmetrically. Differences in thread tension during sewing may also affect the shape while inflated. I assume your canopy is new and has never been wet but reinforcement tape can also shrink and distort the shape. I’m sure PD has more possible causes and will handle your problem the best way possible. Good luck Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  20. Hi folks, I would like to share again the experience I had making a flat top base for my home made camera helmet. I finally bought a cheap (used) Cannon 300D and decided to mount it on my helmet. I also took this opportunity to change its color. Since I had to remove the original paint I used Polyester (very aggressive) resin in the entire process. If you decide to make a similar part and don’t want to damage the original painting of your helmet, you may use epoxy resin or even plaster to make the pattern. You may also secure the top base with bolts instead of permanently bonding it to the helmet but will have to take care not to leave exposed material (nuts or bolt tips) inside the helmet which may hurt your head later (I tried this and did not work very well). Hope this gives some ideas for those who want to install a still camera in a curved top helmet and don’t want to buy those ugly adapters. Here is the link for the step by step pictures (this time I translated everything to English
  21. Will he stay in a hotel for a couple of days? You can order it from any skydive store in US through the web and ask the dealer to ship it to his hotel. Make sure you give his full name and room number (if you already know). He will just have to pick the package at the reception and voilà! Salutations Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  22. Assuming that the lineset is correct and it is Vectran (no trim variation) I suggest you consider installing an h-mod on the nose. Check with your rigger if he is able to do it. It costs about $150, should cure your opening issues and improve performance (which you already like) I've never heard of h-mod on Safires and I always thought they opened nice but I think it would be worth the shot. Safe skies Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  23. If you're buying new anyway I'd recommend The Skydiving Outlet in Deland. Call Marcelo Peragallo, I doubt you can find better prices anywhere else. http://www.tso-d.com/ Safe skies! Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  24. Hi Folks, Is there a point getting a Wings Vision if you're ordering it in one single color (black)? Are the riser covers so much better than the original Wings? Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted
  25. I removed embroideries from mudflaps twice (from rigs I sold). First I used a seam ripper to cut the threads then a cutter of cuticle to pull the lines out. If the embroidery is too big it may not be a good idea. Anyway, it takes time and patience and you should expect a little damage (fraying), specially if you are not very careful. It is also a good idea to whash the container once finished. Engineering Law #5: The most vital dimension on any plan drawing stands the most chance of being omitted