DavidB

Members
  • Content

    1,055
  • Joined

  • Last visited

    Never
  • Feedback

    0%

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

Jump Profile

  • Home DZ
    Lakewood NJ
  • License
    C
  • License Number
    18138
  • Licensing Organization
    USPA
  • Number of Jumps
    209
  • Years in Sport
    25
  1. It's currently just past 8AM, snow is falling at a furious rate as a "Nor'Easter" gets wound up & ready for a 2-day dumping on us poor sad-sacks between NYC & Philly. Having wiped the tears of laughter from my eyes, I can now properly thank you for this morning's most excellent entertainment. Great stuff! Now, go contribute to the "scary stories from the good old days" post! When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  2. The most puzzling part, to me anyway, is the end. They just stand around, waiting for the police to show up... When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  3. She sure would look nice on the side of my Dodge Dart... When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  4. From the "for what it's worth" file: The reserve handle pouch on my Handbury is in-line with the chest strap. Looks like that handle pouch is below the strap. Count me as another vote for Wonderhog. When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  5. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxNylksy4-E&feature=related Funny scary story from the OLD days (Twardo was a young man). When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  6. Last time I saw him was Thanksgiving weekend 1985 (the last weekend of operations at Lakewood, NJ). Someone here mentioned he was busted up pretty badly in a test jump a couple years later. If you search my posts from a year or more ago, in this forum, or just for "Danny Doyle", you'll probably run across it. When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  7. I jumped one once on Dec. 2, 1984. It belonged to Danny Doyle & if I'm remembering correctly the rig was also light blue in color. I can't even begin to guess what color the main was, sorry. The only thing that really stood out about the jump, besides the fact that it was a blue military rig, was that I landed next to the high tension lines along side the GS Parkway. When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  8. The video was great! Bunch of demented old fucks... Damn, I finally found a really good use for the pilot chute pouch (in the small of your back) of a Handbury rig: Rubber chicken storage compartment! Can you imagine reaching back & whipping a rubber chicken out in the middle of a jump?! When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  9. I exited from the wing, as David Layne showed, but I was on the other side (at least that's how I remember it). Gary apologized (more than once) that he was dealing with a crack in the exhaust & didn't want to invert the plane. And again, it was funny & cool standing on the wing talking to the pilot while we approached the exit point & watched for traffic. I would be surprised if he was still alive as Jack was probably pushing 70 then. We did talk a bit both before & after the jump. From what I remember, he & his brother were into restoring old planes as a hobby. The N3N-3 was their last plane. He (Jack) had retired just before it was completed. When the plane was ready, Jack packed his camping gear & just went "barnstorming" (his description) around the country, "sleeping under the wing" when it was nice, & actively seeking out skydivers because he enjoyed their enthusiasm & vibes. Jack was so cool, he didn't want payment for the lift until after the jump. "If you didn't enjoy it, it was on me" is basically what said before the flight. He was fun to talk to, fun to listen to, & we may have even shared a little single malt later that night. That jump, as humble as it was, rates right up there with my most memorable jump ships, like the C-130 & an original right-hand-door DC3 later that year in Quincey, the Beech 99 at United (8 minutes & change to 12.5!), & FOUR Caribous @ the Herd one year. When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  10. I had to check, Howard. While I was in there I snapped this: When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  11. Probably about half my jumps were from 7.5 or there-abouts. When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  12. I was jumping T-10s 8 years later. They still didn't have "brakes" but they did have steering toggles (heavy as HELL steering, but steering none the less). 2500'- static line 3200'- 5-second delay 3600'- 10 seconds 4500'- 15 seconds When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  13. Due to an oversight on my part, I have yet to express my eternal gratitude for this post. Not since reading "How do I get Herculiner off of my hootus?" have I laughed, cried, & GROANED this much. What makes it especially funny to me is the one "small person" I know: To say he has "anger management issues" is putting it mildly. Personal attacks, viscous ones, were the only way he disagreed with anyone on line, & I know someone that's been a personal friend of his since the early 80's that recently cut off all ties because he's getting so hard to deal with. Anyways... Thanks all, I've THOROUGHLY enjoyed the hell out of this! When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  14. Only one, from a Navy N3N-3 in Z-hills, Easter 1986. I thought it was pretty neat that I could stand on the wing & talk to the pilot while waiting to get (slowly) to the exit point. When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.
  15. Curiosity got to me. A little (& I do mean "little") investigation, I discovered a few things. 1- My container was made November 1979. 2-It has a leg pouch W/velcro & the back pouch, but no belly band. 3- Joey D. & I installed a piece of stainless (18 gauge) about 1" wide & 2" wider than the grommets, in the back of the reserve container. Although the entire back of the container is a plastic stiffener, stuffing a tri-con in there wasn't easy & distorted the plastic stiffener to the point that one of the grommets came out. We set new grommets into the stainless (which is under the tray) & it's still flexible enough to curve, but much stiffer than with the plastic alone. There's access to the back of the grommets through the bottom of the back. Let me tell you, it's tight back there! I remember it took both of us more than a little time & effort to get everything in & lined up with the buck (which just barely fit). 4- Note the line stow straps on the back of the reserve container. Yes, it's dirty. What's easiest to clean it with? When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.