evh

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  1. A black dot on your goggles or visor works perfectly well for anything from tandems to bigways. I really do not understand the reason for ringsights. All I hear is "if you are a professional, you should have one". I could be wrong, but so far I have not heard of any real benefits.
  2. I have had both for most of my jumps. I love the mudflap mount (from Bonehead) when under canpoy and for wingsuiting, but I find it hard to read during freefall. Removing it is simple enough, only takes a few seconds.
  3. Bungies prevent your legstraps from moving towards your knees when you are sitflying. If that happens, you could fall out, especially during an premature opening of your canopy (which is bad anyway). For all other body positions I don't really see a need for them. In fact they can be annoying, like in your example where you want to optimise the harness response of your canopy. In practice, I often remove or re-attach my bungie, depending on the type of jump I want to make.
  4. Sorry, I meant the corners are round, I know that not all crossports are perfect circles. At least for the few I looked at.
  5. I recently learned from my rigger that you can estimate the number of jumps on a canopy by the amount of fraying. New crossports are round. At about 1000 jumps they are almost square. Seemed to match pretty well with my own canopies and a few others that I checked.
  6. Bridle attachment? Static line it! A club member of mine did that when his reserve was too old, and he wanted to make at least 1 jump on it before throwing it in the trash. We put it in a static line bag, tied the excess staticline to the harness with some rubber bands and he jumped it from a C182. I was JM :-) It worked perfectly.
  7. Thanks! Can I find the FAI rules somewhere?
  8. This is confusing. It is completely opposite of the definition I am used to . The FAI license requirements even specifically state "freefall": ‘A’ Certificate: ‘Parachutist’ 1. 25 freefall jumps. Why would they do this if staticline jumps also count? Why not simply state "25 jumps"? Surely not because of premature openings? Over here (the Netherlands) I think we try to match the FAI regulations but we don't count SL jumps for the A-licence (also 25 freefall jumps) or the B/C/D license or tandem requirements. Does anybody now what the FAI has to say about this? What do other countries say?
  9. It depends. Is it certified? Everybody knows that uncertified wood has negligible insulation properties, right?
  10. Ok, since you insist. you have been making claims that you can’t back up with any facts, all you have is assumptions and gut feeling. As one mechanical engineer (who makes a living using his head) to another: you should know better than that. It’s just dumb, so dumb.
  11. All kidding aside, I actually think its a good development that manufacturers are testing the performance of their products. Its just that I cant stand the claim of "improvement" without even testing the old situation, this is nothing but empty marketing hype.
  12. Thanks, that is interesting to read. "Scope This European Standard specifies requirements and test methods for protective helmets used in paragliding, hang gliding and flying with ultra-light aeroplanes." So... this "certification" is not even valid for skydiving? I'm quite sure that a helmet which is certified for flying ultralight planes will only give a negligable advantage in skydiving. I can tell that you don't care about about protecting your brain. You care about bumps and scrapes which a non-impact rated helmet is handle well. When it comes to preventing damage to the brain caused by blunt impact like a baseball bat, the ground, or another skydiver, a non-impact rated helmet is not going to substantially limit the amount of force transferred to the brain. 
  13. Yes, you keep repeating that. Simple fact is YOU DON'T KNOW THAT, you are just assuming it.
  14. BTW I had some intimate contact with the wall of several windtunnels, wearing a G3 and I am 100% certain it would have hurt a lot more without a helmet. So in my opinion, your claim that a G3 or any helmet without certification gives no (or negligable) protection is nothing but bs. Certification is nice, it tells me that a certain level of safety is guaranteed. But it does not mean that the reverse is also true, that a non-certified helmet has to be inferior. It just might be.