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  • Home DZ
    Skydive New Mexico
  • License
    A
  • License Number
    71041
  • Licensing Organization
    USPA
  • Number of Jumps
    39
  1. This is essentially what I was thinking. You could make something like that in a day or so using basic electronics, a small dc motor, and reserve rip cord with a stainless steel pin (yay scavenging). And it could be sewn in anywhere that is best for the application while also being smaller than cutters. However, like riggerrob said, there is possibility of hesitation. However isn't this possibility going to be the same as with a cutter? The other option would be to have multi loop attachment to act as a splicer, but that's just adding complication. One benefit outright is that as far as universal application, you could design something like that to work with any AAD. hmmm.... I shall retreat to my workbench.... "I would rather be ashes than dust. I would rather be a majestic eagle riding a missile across the sky with sparklers than be an old couch potato." - Jack London (paraphrased)
  2. Hey all, Maybe someone can tell me why AAD manufacturers use a cutter to release the reserve pilot chute. It seems to me that a cutter would be more likely to fail than, say, a rolling pin design where a pin keeping the closing loop in place were released. Plus cutting through fabric means more replacement and maintenance to ensure proper usage. Thoughts? PS this came after reviewing a certain series of complaints and issues with the Argus system so now I'm really intrigued by the current AAD cutter designs. "I would rather be ashes than dust. I would rather be a majestic eagle riding a missile across the sky with sparklers than be an old couch potato." - Jack London (paraphrased)
  3. The downfall about the micromort (and any descriptive statistics) is that it assumes equal risk and no influence of that risk. The wiki article couldn't have summed it up better: "Micromorts for future activities can only be rough assessments..." Personally I think the better way to look at it is by thinking, "which of the factors within the sport influence risk the most?" rather than trying to just assess general risk. You can't really analyze this stuff scientifically, because I doubt anyone would want to do low turns just to find out how many it takes before s/he dies :P. But you can categorize historical data if you have it and get an idea of what's contributing most to the risk. So I've attached several categorical histograms. It's not an analysis, just a representation of numbers and anyone can interpret it differently. Data from USPA (years not known) number of fatality reports: 106 *** I drive my ZX14 to and from the DZ. Can one of you "number cruncher" type dudes please access the probability of me living to age 60? Cool The magic 8-b.... I mean the statistics say it isn't good. xD "I would rather be ashes than dust. I would rather be a majestic eagle riding a missile across the sky with sparklers than be an old couch potato." - Jack London (paraphrased)
  4. My instructors said it would be good to get a feel for what the earth looks like at pull altitude, but thanks to them I can see it from even lower xP. Didn't even know what ground rush really looked like, but now I know and fuck that :D EDIT: Also, it looks like the one diver checked his altimeter and kept right on smiling as he went for the pull. think he'd have made it? >< "I would rather be ashes than dust. I would rather be a majestic eagle riding a missile across the sky with sparklers than be an old couch potato." - Jack London (paraphrased)
  5. I mean yeah I get what this is driving at, but this isn't statistical analysis. It's what's known as descriptive statistics. This kind of number crunching isn't useful for proper analysis because there's no determination of how a particular factor is weighted in risk analysis or whether the binary probability distribution is the right model to use. Yeah it's a risky sport in the sense that you risk your life trusting a variety of factors to come together to get you back on the ground safely. However, are the deaths due to skydiving or the person skydiving? Sweet GLM analysis time. Shit, is this risk significant to p
  6. Perhaps I'm just too much of an idiot to think like a well-esteemed and open-minded individual like Kim (snicker snicker), but let's say skydiving stopped at that airport. Then what? Are general aviation operations to be stopped as well? What's the point of having an airport then? If skydivers move out, GA will move in no question and back to square one. If that does happen y'all should get ultralights and buzz the houses. Nothing wrong with that according to the FARs :P "I would rather be ashes than dust. I would rather be a majestic eagle riding a missile across the sky with sparklers than be an old couch potato." - Jack London (paraphrased)
  7. I am definitely not knowledgeable enough in the sport for you to go off what I experience, but when I have an opening after belly-to-earth freefall, I notice that I feel only a small amount of pressure on my shoulders just as the main is being extracted. After that I am usually at a slight angle for the remainder of the opening and I feel most of the opening shock against my legs/hips. Perhaps I'm just not noticing the force, but either way I personally wouldn't want to risk even more time out of the game or inability to deal with a mal or even basic canopy maneuvers if it broke. "I would rather be ashes than dust. I would rather be a majestic eagle riding a missile across the sky with sparklers than be an old couch potato." - Jack London (paraphrased)
  8. Sounds like you killed everything else which is awesome. I can't wait to freefall man, you make it seems so exciting while I'm over here nervous for the first solo hop and pop xD haha "I would rather be ashes than dust. I would rather be a majestic eagle riding a missile across the sky with sparklers than be an old couch potato." - Jack London (paraphrased)
  9. Meant to hit the reply and cursor jumped to the add friend thingy. Oops xD ah well, I'm new here actually, but I saw you were from Quebec and I'm talkative. What DZs there are out there because I'm heading to Quebec for a conference in august (hoping to have my A-lic. by then :D) Also Hi! "I would rather be ashes than dust. I would rather be a majestic eagle riding a missile across the sky with sparklers than be an old couch potato." - Jack London (paraphrased)
  10. Hey all, Name's Clifford and I'm an IAD student from New Mexico trying to become less a frantic swimmer in Cat-B and more a skydiver that can pull his own pilot chute x) Definitely enjoying the sport so far and looking forward to being more involved! Nice to meet y'all in advance! "I would rather be ashes than dust. I would rather be a majestic eagle riding a missile across the sky with sparklers than be an old couch potato." - Jack London (paraphrased)