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Tigerfly

Gear checks

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Can anyone recommend maybe a good YouTube video or something that goes over a good, thorough, gear check? I feel maybe a little behind on that. I completed AFF a few years ago, then right after had to take a few years off, for pregnancy and medical reasons husband and I. We covered this shortly, when I got back to jumping a couple months ago, but I feel like I can spend more time on it. By the time I had gear on, we had a few minutes until we we on the load. My instructor did check my ADD and handles and everything, so I know I was safe, but I still need to know how to do all the safety checks myself. Thanks!

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Hi tigerfly, welcome back. I can make the video you suggested but my technical skills suck so im not sure how to upload it as I dont have a you tube account. But I will work on it and see if a friend can get it up.

But for now here is a list. When I get to the DZ I check my altimeter is on zero and moves,then turn on aad, and check to make sure my reserve cable actually moves freely and pin is seated not damaged and seal is in tact,then check 3 handles(in order),then check main pin and confirm color in the bridal window, then check three rings. Once that is done also confirm that there are no twist in your leg straps and that your chest strap is fed through the friction bar properly.

Then before each jump I always check main pin is seated(even though I always pack for myself), closing loop not frayed, pilot chute is cocked(color in bridal widow), correct bridal path, and pilot chute not hanging out of BOC, then put the rig on and check cutaway and reserve handle, and simulate deployment,cutaway,and reserve pull.

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Gear checks are so important that they should be done 3 times every jump: in hangar, pre-boarding and pre-exit.

When you first arrive at the DZ, the first thing you should is inspect your gear. Start at the left shoulder working your way down 3-rings, chest strap, reserve ripcord handle and leg strap.
Repeat the inspection working your way down the right side of your harness. Then work your way diagonally up the back confirming that BOC, main bridle, main pin, reserve pin and AAD are all correct. Finish your gear check by returning to your starting point by sliding your reserve ripcord cable back and forth.
Complete your hangar check by collecting 3 accessories: helmet, goggles and altimeter. Use your helmet - like a bucket - to stow your smaller accessories - beside your rig.
Now go bribe manifest with chocolate.
Hah!
Hah!

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I suggest you get with an instructor or rigger and get a one-on-one briefing. Watching a video is nice, but there's no way to ask questions for clarification and no way for you to demonstrate knowledge after the instruction. The video may also utilize gear that is nothing like you jump or what others in your area jump.

Getting a briefing from a local, competent person will complete the learning cycle and insure you are getting accurate information.
Chuck Akers
D-10855
Houston, TX

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^What he said, I'm still fairly new myself and had a basic understanding of a gear check like making sure the pin is fully pushed in and stuff like that, finally just asked a rigger if he had time to go over a gear check more in depth with me and told him what I knew already, he went over things I would of never guessed to look at, was extremely helpful and told me the next couple times I come in if he isn't in the middle of something to just pull him aside and have him watch me do one to make sure I have it down if I'm unsure. After all it's something that could save your life.

Skydivers seem to be pretty friendly people, don't hesitate to ask about what you don't know ;)

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chuckakers

I suggest you get with an instructor or rigger and get a one-on-one briefing. Watching a video is nice, but there's no way to ask questions for clarification and no way for you to demonstrate knowledge after the instruction. The video may also utilize gear that is nothing like you jump or what others in your area jump.

Getting a briefing from a local, competent person will complete the learning cycle and insure you are getting accurate information.



I was visiting a DZ and observed an instructor giving a solo rated student a gear check. The student could not explain the RSL to the instructor, really having no clue what it was or was for.

Yes, seek someone of high competence. Maybe they can spot something you need to understand better, in additions to helping you check your gear. Obviously this student has missed out on something and needed some additional training.
Instructor quote, “What's weird is that you're older than my dad!”

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jeffrey27rj

***My instructor did check my ADD



Didn't know instructors were qualified to give ADD checks.....good to know we can now all skip the psychiatrist!!!

That's why the 4- and 8-year checks on a cypres are no longer mandatory on the newest models. Putting some Ritalin in the control unit will do the job just as well as Airtec's testing and evaluation would do.

Kidding aside:
ADD = Automatic Deployment Device, the pre-legislative term for AAD (Automatic Activation Device
"That formation-stuff in freefall is just fun and games but with an open parachute it's starting to sound like, you know, an extreme sport."
~mom

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Au contaire Mr. Dthames,

To avoid over-loading students, new information is best dispensed in small doses.
First jump courses usually only cover the bare minimums by focussing on "must knows."
Other information, (should knows) techniques can he gradually added a little at a time.
"Could knows" are wrapped up as the junior jumper prepares to write the exit licence exam.

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riggerrob

Au contaire Mr. Dthames,

To avoid over-loading students, new information is best dispensed in small doses.
First jump courses usually only cover the bare minimums by focussing on "must knows."
Other information, (should knows) techniques can he gradually added a little at a time.
"Could knows" are wrapped up as the junior jumper prepares to write the exit licence exam.



I know what you are saying is true. However, in the SIM, section 4, Category C, "Equipment" included Full Orientation of the closed container. Also the RSL is covered on the Category D quiz. A student on Solo status should know what the RSL is. Just saying.
Instructor quote, “What's weird is that you're older than my dad!”

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chuckakers

******I suggest you get with an instructor or rigger


Is that really necessary?:P

It shouldn't be, but unfortunately it sometimes is. :(

I agree but I think the question arises out of a lack of personal confidence.

I have always started with helmet,goggles,chinstrap... down to shoelaces tied, inclusive of all zippers zipped. Then a final handle, goggle check prior to exit.Of course you have complete confidence in your rig before you put it on, you've checked it before it goes on.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-Idkhud5hY

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Okay. I DO know to put my legs in the leg straps.thanks for the laugh though. I haven't done anything that silly. Yet. I still have to wonder though, was that video for real?! Do people really forget the leg straps?! Anyways....ummm maybe "gear check" was the wrong term. Maybe what I'm looking for is a video on "gear inspection." Like when the instructor says "go get your gear together." It's not my gear. So yeah, I like to make sure what I'm jumping is going to work out for me! So something that goes over top to bottom, front to back of rig. Pin checks. RSL. Check webbing. All that fun stuff. I know I need a helmet, goggles, altimeter and that a rig is highly recommended....;) suggestions? Thanks! And I will make sure to go over this with instructor. I just like something to watch a few times over again to review.

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Tigerfly

Okay. I DO know to put my legs in the leg straps.thanks for the laugh though.



I'm pretty sure that guy knew to put his legs in the leg straps too.

I know it seems funny, but it's a serious point: distraction can happen to literally anyone. People with hundreds and even thousands of jumps have made this same mistake and exited the plane.

If you look at someone's terrible mistake in skydiving and tell yourself, "I would never be stupid enough to make that mistake" then you are in trouble.

This is precisely why we do gear checks. Everyone makes mistakes - the trick is to account for that, and have practices that will (preferably) keep them to a minimum, or (otherwise) catch them before they kill anyone.

(Stupid, avoidable situations are a different thing - I'm talking about heat of the moment brain malfunctions here. If you're doing a naked Mr Bill on a Velo off some guy you just met's sailplane, I can't help you.)
--
"I'll tell you how all skydivers are judged, . They are judged by the laws of physics." - kkeenan

"You jump out, pull the string and either live or die. What's there to be good at?

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