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sheeks

Suspension lines order importance

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Let’s say you went to replace your slinks, and all of the correct riser group lines were attached to the correct risers, and going through the correct slider grommets, but  you accidentally let some of the lines on a riser get out of order when putting them on a new slink. Maybe one line rotated 180 degrees, and maybe the second and third lines out of the four got put in each other’s place. Would this make a big difference? Is there any good way to see which lines go in which order?

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It's fairly simple to check the order. Have a friend spread out the canopy, you stand near the slinks, take one of the lines from a slink and pull it to see where it attaches to the canopy. The ones on the outside of the riser should be attached to the outside of the canopy (the order of the lines on a slink should be the same as the order they are attached to the canopy).

As for making a difference, I don't know the magnitude (I assume it would if nothing introduce friction of the lines) but not really sure why you wouldn't have this fixed whatever the difference it makes (it should be attached the way it's supposed to be attached). As for twists in the lines you can check it the same way you untwist your toggle lines.

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if the second and third one are both “a” lines, “b”s ect. I can see them rubbing each other right on the soft link causing faster wear. I don’t see a 180 twist being an issue on one line but there’s no reason to leave any of this there since it’s so easy to fix. will it cause issues with flight?.... “maybe”  It’ll be better if it is right before you use it.

 

thats my 2 cents anyway.  

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Lines out of order at the link doesn't matter for function.  A twist (or two or three) in a line doesn't matter for function either.  There won't be any noticeable increase in wear.  

What will matter is having a line wrap all the way around another line.

Having everything in order and straight will make you feel better about your gear, though.

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Alright so is there a general rule of thumb for which lines on which riser are supposed to connect with which lines on the canopy? Like fronts are C’s and Ds and rears are A’s and B’s or something?

 

I’ve never learned how to do a full individual line continuity check like that

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It is not a "rule of thumb."  It is a requirement for the slider to work right:  Front lines ("A" and "B") go through the front slider grommets, rear lines ("C", "D", and control lines) through the rear.  Right side lines go through the right side slider grommets, left side lines go through the left side slider grommets.  You can confirm your continuity check by looking up the next time you jump.

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9 hours ago, sheeks said:

Let’s say you went to replace your slinks, and all of the correct riser group lines were attached to the correct risers, and going through the correct slider grommets, but  you accidentally let some of the lines on a riser get out of order when putting them on a new slink. Maybe one line rotated 180 degrees, and maybe the second and third lines out of the four got put in each other’s place. Would this make a big difference? Is there any good way to see which lines go in which order?

If you do not know and understand completely the answers to those questions you should not be changing your own slinks. You should not be learning how to do it by reading it here. You should get someone who knows what they’re doing to show you. It’s actually fairly simple.

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Ended up figuring it out last night from a video that PD has on youtube, it was much easier than I thought it would be. the only lines that were misrouted, were the ones that I expected to be misrouted. Even though I obsessively did a line continuity test like 5 times on each individual line after, i’ll still have my rigger check it

Knowledge is power

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It astonishes me that some one would ask a question like this here or that we would try to answer it. Don't people go to the dropzone any more? Don't people drink beer any more? This is the sort of question that should be answered standing around the hanger after the last load. People sould just show you or as the very least a green bottle should buy you a full lesson.

 

I'll give you a hint to make a continuity check easier. You don't always have the ability to hang it up where you can easily see the routing. If you are doing it on the floor flat on its side. You can start at the canopy and load the lines of the riser into your fingers separating then on your hand and walk that whole group back to the riser. You can also use a course comb. Load all the lines into it in order at the canopy. Use a second comb from the top to lock them in place. You can even secure them with rubber bands on the ends as you walk it back. 

 

It's some thing I learned working with larger more complex canopies. With like 124 lines 60 ft long. 16 risers and 22 grommets in the slider. Try line checking that by your self.

 

Lee

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I agree that this should ideally be DZ in-person stuff, but some people are not fortunate enough to have knowledgable people nearby that they can lubricate with a drink for learning this kind of stuff.

And you got me interested, what kind of monster requires 16 risers?!

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Strong c1200 cargo canopy. 1200 sqft 15 cells. A,b,c,d,e,f,g lines. grommet spacing can't really be wider then the cell so you wind up with an inner and outer set of grommets to allow three cells to inflate with the slider up. It gives you the area you need to deccelerate the payload before the rest of the canopy opens. You wind up with four grommets front to back in four rows and six on the back edge for break lines. They extend the back edge of the slider and have there own slider stops to increase its area. You actually have eight primary risers that give you inner and outer on each side. They Y near the top  front to back to allow the slider to come all the way down, accommodate those four grommets in each row. 16x7 noncascaded 1000 lb lines and 6 primary break lines 2000 lb split to 12 attachment points. 

 

So ya, it's a beast, 68 lbs of joy, but I've seen it survive 20,000 lb opening shock.

 

Lee

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7 hours ago, RiggerLee said:

Strong c1200 cargo canopy. 1200 sqft 15 cells. A,b,c,d,e,f,g lines. grommet spacing can't really be wider then the cell so you wind up with an inner and outer set of grommets to allow three cells to inflate with the slider up. It gives you the area you need to deccelerate the payload before the rest of the canopy opens. You wind up with four grommets front to back in four rows and six on the back edge for break lines. They extend the back edge of the slider and have there own slider stops to increase its area. You actually have eight primary risers that give you inner and outer on each side. They Y near the top  front to back to allow the slider to come all the way down, accommodate those four grommets in each row. 16x7 noncascaded 1000 lb lines and 6 primary break lines 2000 lb split to 12 attachment points. 

 

So ya, it's a beast, 68 lbs of joy, but I've seen it survive 20,000 lb opening shock.

 

Lee

Were the openings on that thing super soft?

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At normal operating speeds, with full fuel exaustion, the absolute slows it down to about 100, the openings are about average, 3 g. So pretty soft.  Early shut down can double the mass of more. So the terminal goes up. You can be dealing with four times the kinetic energy on opening. If it's a flat shot, like a guidance failure, you can be going fast horizontally. If it's high enough it will wait a few seconds to let it slow down before deploying the main. 

 

Lee

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