mccordia

Members
  • Content

    7,091
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    7
  • Feedback

    0%

mccordia last won the day on September 6

mccordia had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

41 Neutral

2 Followers

Social Media

Gear

  • Main Canopy Size
    150
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    143
  • AAD
    Cypres 2

Jump Profile

  • Home DZ
    The world
  • License
    D
  • License Number
    94775
  • Licensing Organization
    KNVvL
  • Number of Jumps
    6000
  • Tunnel Hours
    1500
  • Years in Sport
    22
  • First Choice Discipline
    Wing Suit Flying
  • First Choice Discipline Jump Total
    4500
  • Second Choice Discipline
    Freeflying
  • Second Choice Discipline Jump Total
    500
  • Freefall Photographer
    No

Ratings and Rigging

  • Formation
    Coach
  • USPA Coach
    No
  • Pro Rating
    Yes
  • Wingsuit Instructor
    Yes

Recent Profile Visitors

1,253 profile views
  1. Over the last 18 years of flying, I've posted various educational coaching material available online on flying technique in form of writing and videos. During the lockdown period in 2020, I finally took the effort to collect and rewrite all of that in a cohesive and structured book, called 'the flight manual' For those interested in getting into wingsuit flying, I figured it would be an interesting resource, and for those already flying there should be a lot of interesting information on performance, acrobatics and gear that might be of assistance in your progression. The book www.flylikebrick.com/book/ Reviews www.facebook.com/mccordia/reviews/
  2. I have (had) a Hunter which had around 800 Skydives, a good 100 WS Basejumps and 400+ hours in the wingsuit tunnel, and thats still flying around, currently owned by someone else... There is some degradation in terms of fabric porosity, which might affect full flight performance by a single digit percentage, but in general flying, no real issues should arise. Some older (old, old) suits do tend to get in trouble with inlets collapsing, and fabric not holding air well, and as a result, legwing or armwing flapping. But all of that is usually when talking about 500+ jumps on a suit minimum..
  3. Incorrect...proof was a short film that Fandango was based on. Truman Sparks is the same actor/person in both.
  4. Old thread, but: Atair uses the same method as PD, essentially 'projection' and not corner to corner / sidewalls included..
  5. To the best of my knowledge, the first wingsuit tandem with a real passenger was done on Texel, Netherlands around 2004 for a TV show called 'Jules Unlimited' the host was the passenger, both TI and passenger wearing a wingsuit (birdman classic). No idea/memory of who did the 'stunt'. I've seen many variations over the years, most with experienced skydivers/wingsuit pilots as the passenger. I think the recent one Vincent posted are all experienced skydivers too as passenger as well. All variations (2 x WS, Passenger in WS, TI in WS) are probably not smartest thing to do with real passengers due to potential complications...
  6. DB Cooper on Marvel Series 'Loki'
  7. That is around 150% of the actual price of flying (including coaching). Sadly the tunnel is steeply priced, but the quoted numbers here are around $500 per hour more than reality. 40 minutes per day is also roughly the max what most customers can handle. Flying 90 minutes during 'a morning in the tunnel' is something Id be keen to see. The skill, precision and progress achieved in an hour of coached flying ($1000 +-) would get you only 20 coached skydives (2 slots) if you are actually getting the coach for free. Seeing most coaches charge around 250$ for a day, you'd be looking at 15 very rushed jumps, if you match that budget of 1000$ with a lot of things not possible to match in skydiving with regards to speed of learning in the tunnel. Looking at a realistic day in the tunnel being 30 or 40 minutes of flying, you would equal only about 6 or so coached 1on 1 WS skydives on the same budget. But I would love to jump at the dropzone where Id get 60 x 2 slots for that price and a coach for free. Nobody is forcing you to go to a WS tunnel, but thinking you get more progression out of 60 solo skydives, is perhaps also a tad too optimistic. A bit of tunnel and a lot of skydives are a more optimal combination. Depending on the dropzone you go to, perhaps also not an accurate reflection of reality. I have no insight in bookings beyond our own, but we're coaching at indoor wingsuit through our own team, only one week a month (8 to 10 camps per year) and so far are always fully booked/sold out, flying around 30 hours of customers per camp. The views on wingsuit flying as a group of people with no goals in skill or competitive disciplines is something of quite a few years ago, and we're seeing many teams and individuals with a similar drive as often visible in freefly / tunnel who are coming back to the tunnel for multiple visits a year. As young as the tunnel in Sweden is, just looking at our pool of customers (our = just one of several freelancers) we have a large group of people who are pushing beyond 20 hours of flying, and still learning and eager for more. It's a steep price, around 900$ for the time without coaching, which I also wish would come down. But proflyers are a good share of the market. The first time experience there also seems to always be a positive one (not something I/we offer, but we do see a lot of them coming through the tunnel and loving it), so for sure there is a lot of potential there with the right marketing. Youtube and WS base have created a big monster in terms of interest, which can be used for sure to promote and pull (first timer) customers in...
  8. Ifly seems to have banned freelance / visiting coaches and camps now, as I read in some well known freefly coaches (frustrated) instagram stories. seems to also not be a great / strange thing if increased business/ time sales is what they want...
  9. Just things I hear mentioned here as reasoning for difficulty in securing financing/funding, not subjects Im at any level an expert in myself
  10. There are currently 4 or 5 locations worldwide in EU, USA and Russia where future Wingsuit Tunnel projects are planned. To be clear, we are active as ws coaches with a good 1500 hrs flying/teaching experience but are not owners or shareholders in the company, and our information on the USA tunnel is based on what we read online and the scarce info that is shared with us from IWF. The USA tunnel in FL timeline seems to be: 2021/2022: Find Investors / Arrange Permits etc 2023: Build and Opening Depending on how easy or hard it is to source financing in a post-covid world, with in the USA a struggling IFLY on the edge of bankruptcy as an example, it could end up even stretching towards 2024, or even a risk of it not happening at all. We of course hope to see our working grounds expanded to USA as well, but are aware it's not easy times to get such a project financed. What the actual timeline will look like, no idea...but optimism seems to be needed..
  11. Noting you're also a basejumper, do you think the length of (often longer shaped) BASE containers, and being used to those from frequent jumping, might have something to do with the trouble reaching? I know I always need a few jumps to get used to my (long) skydiving container, as its still noticeably shorter than the thin/long container I use for basejumping. Always making the first few jumps after not jumping for a while, feel like it's quite a reach... Not implying that's the issue, but merely asking, as (though I never had a problematic pull) it for sure is a thing I always need to be aware of with the switch. Similar to going from a 285 sq/ft to a 150 sq/ft canopy, on subsequent days where I go from BASE to skydive.
  12. Not vertical, but should anyone have questions or requests related to the inclined wingsuit tunnel in Sweden, I'll gladly be of service..
  13. Ive been using a WinX for a years. Smooth/Soft openings. Designed for wingsuit, but its opening characteristics make it supernice for regular freefall / camerawork
  14. Those lists, and much much more have been available for more than 10 years. The problem sadly is one of attitude, shortcuts and instant gratification. There is a huge community in all disciplines eager to teach and share knowledge, just not everyone is as interested in doing something with that..it's a very small percentage thankfully, but it does happen..
  15. Youtube etc. seems to also have created an influx of AFF students who seem hellbent on wingsuit proximity flying. Problem is that these people usually only see skydiving as a hurdle they have to pass/get over in order to do what they really want to do. This leads to people who just want to quickly get the jumps done, without showing to much care or interest in actually being part of the sport, or actually picking up a discipline. 200 ish jumps planking on solo tracking dives, and then quickly to wingsuit and wingsuit base. It's thankfully not a big portion of students, but you do see it more and more often. And it's always very hard to motivate and get people to care and show interest in what they are doing when jumping from a plane. It's perhaps 'too normal'....I don't know... Im still enjoying every single jump as much as the first one, and always interested in learning more...