obelixtim

Members
  • Content

    2,919
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Feedback

    0%

Everything posted by obelixtim

  1. obelixtim

    Frank Orvos (NZ)

    RIP Frank, ex Manawatu Skydiving club. Judge at several nationals in the 70s. The big C strikes another one down.
  2. The answer is.....Yes. But, as usual, there is always someone who knows better than the majority of experienced jumpers.
  3. RIP Richard Kinloch, who was a good buddy back in the 70s at Manawatu Skydiving Club before he moved to Australia and jumped at Elderslie DZ. Ex RNZAF. We had some crazy good times back in those days. Fly free old mate. ETA: Richard posted on DZ.com as Marisan. Hadn't been on here for a while as he was battling the effects of a stroke a couple of years ago.
  4. obelixtim

    182 engine failures

    You're kidding right? "inform not enforce" translates to "I can do whatever I want because I wont get in trouble for it anyway". Imagine if the police only 'informed' citizens about the laws they broke and not actually enforced any of them. The FAA needs to step in the other direction and start handing out larger fines, revoking pilot licenses, and grounding aircraft permanently. What do you think would motivate a DZO more to do maintenance, threat that the FAA will come over to them and 'inform' them about the FARs they broke, or threat that the FAA will fine them six figures and ground their entire fleet? Are you really having this much trouble, or maybe I should say lack of trust, at your DZ? Was it an incident or something else that made you feel like you aren't safe when you skydive where you do? Have you talked to anyone else at your DZ to see if there isn't a way to address it locally? I dont have any major concerns at my DZ. However, I have jumped at places which are sketch city and even more mainstream DZs still usually do at least one thing unsafe. I am not going to name names because it simply doesent matter at this point. But I once stood by a girl at a very prominent DZ, one which I am very confident you've heard of, and overheard her instructor give her a WS course. It was her first time flying a WS, she only had 200 jumps and had never jumped a WS. Her instructor gave her maybe 10 minutes of ground instruction, 5 of which was spent getting her into the suit, and then she was on the same load as me. So basically five minutes of instruction and that was her entire first flight course for her first jump... And she had the absolute bare minimal jumps required for a WS jump. You can decide whether you think that is unsafe or not, but I would say it's a pattern of negligence and I see stuff like that at many DZs all over the place. If it's not shitty instruction at one DZ, it's lack of checking rigs when a new jumper comes to visit at another, or maybe a complete disregard to exit order at some other DZ, or maybe failure to ground students when the winds are honking at 20 - 25 knots... Those are all examples I've seen, and I have plenty more. So when I see stuff like that, stuff in which I KNOW that any experienced jumper knows is wrong, I dont have much of a mentality for 'educate, not punish'. Education is for people that made an understandable mistake. Punishments are for those who do know better and chose to break the rules anyway because they dont give a shit. I am not saying all DZs break the rules. Some are fantastic, but not all are. I thought this was about FAA and airplane maintenance. You've sidestepped the discussion nicely.
  5. obelixtim

    182 engine failures

    You're kidding right? "inform not enforce" translates to "I can do whatever I want because I wont get in trouble for it anyway". Imagine if the police only 'informed' citizens about the laws they broke and not actually enforced any of them. The FAA needs to step in the other direction and start handing out larger fines, revoking pilot licenses, and grounding aircraft permanently. What do you think would motivate a DZO more to do maintenance, threat that the FAA will come over to them and 'inform' them about the FARs they broke, or threat that the FAA will fine them six figures and ground their entire fleet? I don't think you really understand the meaning of "inform" rather than "enforce", as it pertains to how the FAA operates. There are plenty of sanctions for those who wilfully ignore the rules who then have incidents and accidents. Its advising operators how to comply, especially when new operational procedures are introduced, rather than waving a big stick at a pile of rubble AFTER an accident has occurred.
  6. obelixtim

    Watching out for newbies [was - hard impact at Nats]

    Not what I'm saying at all. I'm saying: "enjoy yourself, but don't fuck up doing so. Especially on my DZ. If you make me discipline you, I will. And you sure as hell won't like it". That has been very effective in keeping the dickheads in line, and uninjured. Horse shit! Who do you hang out with? In 44 years on DZs around the world, I've met a hell of a lot of skydivers. Very few have ego problems. Of course there are some blowhards, but most are down to earth nice people who are good to be around. Blowhards and ego trippers typically get sorted out pretty damn quick. Nah, too touchy feely for me. I don't like to waste time with idiots. And I have zero sympathy for idiots who screw up. Best way is to inform them straight up, seriously, that they need an attitude change, and if that's too difficult, find another DZ. It works.
  7. obelixtim

    Watching out for newbies [was - hard impact at Nats]

    (This is not aimed at you MB465) Anyone who jumps just to look cool has an ego problem. Just jumping out of plane impresses non jumpers. Other jumpers don't really give a shit. Just be comfortable with yourself and enjoy what you have achieved. Why the need to impress others? It strikes me as a lack of self assurance.
  8. As has been said, you have to want to skydive for your own reasons. It doesn't work trying to please others. Wifey is getting her own buzz, so she doesn't really need you to jump for her sake. You've given it a good shot, be proud of that. You have nothing to prove, and no one at the DZ will think any less of you if you decide to move on. Lots of people do. Its pointless putting yourself through the wringer if you are getting nothing positive from it. The suggestion to take up paragliding or hang gliding, gliding or even getting a pilots licence, is a good one if you enjoy the flight phase. Do something YOU want to. Don't be pressured by what others may say or feel about the sport. Make your own decisions and stick to them. I think you've made the right decision. Skydiving is meant to be fun, not torture. Well done on the weight loss. There are plenty of people out there who fall like a cannon ball, me included. Good luck.
  9. obelixtim

    Water Dropzone - Looks Safe

    In the below video the jumpers are landing with huge inflatables that look like the ones that will upright people. How often do people drown using the method in the video? How often do people get tangled in gear? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzbr-Cqgdfc Are you seriously suggesting we should dump first time students in the water, or just pursuing a topic of discussion for academic reasons? He's not seriously suggesting anything. Its just he knows nothing about skydiving. Time wasting.
  10. What if the tandem had a separate video flyer? Doesn't matter. I only mentioned tandem altitude b/c above that you really start to land late, and it does make sense to let the pilot and wingsuiters know there will be a canopy in airspace it normally wouldn't be in. But as well all know, it is horizontal separation that matters between groups, not vertical. If I end my skydive early, whether intentional or not, none of the other freefall groups should be affected. Even wingsuiters should be on a flight path well off the standard flight line. I wouldn't make a habit of assuming anything. Its a bad habit, which sooner or later, will bite you on the arse. What is the problem with informing others of your intentions anyway? More information is always a better option than less.
  11. obelixtim

    Cilliers Trial UK.

    I thought they had figured that case out?
  12. obelixtim

    Are Earplugs Dangerous to Use in Freefall?

    Gives you something to chew on when you are stuck up a tree waiting for rescue. Could be dangerous if you choke on one.
  13. obelixtim

    a question about old cutaway systems

    Not Marty Feldman. Monty Python sketch. Four Yorkshiremen. You'll find it on You Tube.
  14. obelixtim

    a question about old cutaway systems

    I'd forgotten about frap wraps, but the R2s and R3s were the bees knees. Couldn't think of a better system than that, then Booth came up with the 3 ring circus and that just killed the others stone dead. And time has proven the genius of his design.
  15. obelixtim

    Cilliers Trial UK.

    We seem to be going round in circles here. A licence is a Certificate of Proficiency and can not be revoked. The Articles of Association state, but as I very much doubt he is a current member Council would be unable to do anything until he reapplied for membership (at which time he would have served his time, albeit remaining on licence for the rest of his life). There have been bans in the past, in relation to fixed-object jumping fatalities but they turned out not to be lifetime (I'm confused as to whether that was the intention or not), but there were threats of lifetime bans if BPA Members were found to be BASE jumping afterwards. The BPA Operations Manual later changed to state that Fixed Object jumping did not come within the provisions of the Operations Manual in order to distance itself. So here's an interesting question; has it actually been prejudicial to the Association? Would people think less of the sport and the association because of the actions of a criminal? Or do they think it is the act of a psychopath who could have used a number of methods to carry out his crime? If he'd tampered with the brakes of the car would it be prejudicial to the manufacturer of the car? I suspect it is all moot as I too doubt he would ever visit a dropzone ever again. I think it would reinforce the perception amongst the great unwashed that skydiving is an incredibly dangerous activity, and so it could be argued to have damaged the sport. Although it would be unlikely to change the minds of those so prejudiced anyway. But it is bad PR, especially for those making a living from skydiving. I've spent a lot of time over the years educating the public about skydiving, so anything that reinforces an opposite view is a negative, in my mind anyway.
  16. obelixtim

    Cilliers Trial UK.

    He's damaged the image of skydiving and brought the sport into disrepute because of his actions. For those reasons alone, I would think the BPA could pass a motion to ban him for life, at an AGM. I would hope someone brings such a motion to an AGM, regardless. I don't think anyone would regard that as unconstitutional or unfair. I doubt he would have the balls to show his face on a DZ ever again anyway.
  17. obelixtim

    Cilliers Trial UK.

    His licence would be invalid after 18 years anyway. And he won't be forgotten. But it would be an appropriate gesture from the BPA anyway, to demonstrate skydivers revulsion and contempt for his actions, and to show the public how we view him.
  18. obelixtim

    EPs: Look up before pulling reserve?

    No. One second can be the difference between life and death. There is a reason EPs are taught the way they are. Stick to that, it gives you your best chance of survival.
  19. obelixtim

    Dealing with high shock loading

    The first Ramair jump I did was on an early Strato Star, which had the pilot chute reefing system in place, but that system didn't have a slider. Instead you had a bridle cord that consisted of 20 odd feet of rope that went down through the canopy and through rings around the bottom of the canopy. It worked fine, but was made redundant when the slider came out. I remember hearing about the Volplane, which apparently had some sort of hydraulic system which you could apparently set for terminal/sub terminal jumps, but I know nothing about how it worked. I saw one jumped once, as I recall. It was owned by an old guy who was a physics professor, so maybe the hydraulic system was his own invention. I can't imagine how it would work. People were messing around with the early squares at that stage. Apparently the Volplane had the performance of a cheapo. Maybe an older fart than me can elaborate on that. ETA: Just found something about them on this very site...so the reefing system came out with the canopy. Maybe we could begin by looking back to help sort out the future. The Delta 2 OSI system is another. Modern versions could be a starting point. http://www.dropzone.com/forum/Skydiving_C1/Skydiving_History_%26_Trivia_F21/Volplane_Hydraulic_Reefing_Device_P4582058/
  20. obelixtim

    Dealing with high shock loading

    Rubber bands on the tail to hold excess brake line and slider is nothing new.
  21. As ye sow, so shall ye reap.
  22. We had one, the container was painted yellow. The lines were fully stowed in bands, because part of the reserve drill was to throw the canopy, then pull the lines out of the stows and feed them out. Where the canopy was "S" folded into the container, the deployments were messy, because once the container was opened, often the canopy would just fall out in a big mess. To alleviate that, we roll packed the canopy, just rolling it up from the apex like a toilet roll. You had a much firmer grasp on the canopy, and it deployed in a much more orderly manner. (Easier to repack too) I was glad we switched to cutaways with pilot shot reserves.
  23. obelixtim

    Cilliers Trial UK.

    On 3 separate counts, enough to establish that the incidents were more than coincidence....blood on the gas valve pretty damning. How he thought messing with a parachute would escape detection show him as not being very smart. Sabotage of a parachute is a dog act, and the sentence should reflect that. Our sport relies heavily on trust. His shenanigans with his ex wife and girlfriend while still married paint him as rather an unpleasant person with low morals. Glad it was resolved finally. Did they give a date for sentencing?
  24. Awesome work Gabe. Did IFLY give you any logical reason for their decision making? It seems odd that: a: They would turn down business. b: They wouldn't recognise the positive PR they would garner from participating. I've participated in a programme with an organisation called Canteen....kids (teenagers) with terminal cancer, where they had an annual week long live in camp (mainly to give caregivers a break) where volunteers gave up their time to help out (doctors, nurses etc) and the local operators donated activities for them. We gave free tandems, but they got to go jetboating, white water rafting, sea fishing, rides on Harleys (the local bikie gang chipped in with that), as well as many other activities. The local service clubs (Rotary, Lions etc) provided all sorts of help and organising, and basically the whole community got involved. Those kids had a ball, but I think all of us got much more out of it. Money can't buy that kind of experience. Sadly very few of those kids were seen at the next years camp.....which was sad. Not a good look for IFLY, especially in todays world of social media. I'd like to hear their reasoning....
  25. Fear is normal. What you are experiencing at this point is fear of the unknown. However, once you have been through the training you will understand a lot more on how the equipment works, and how to deal with problems. Knowledge dispels fear. What you learn will better prepare you for the jump, and while it won't dispel the fear totally, it will reduce it to manageable levels. If you are not ready to jump, your instructors won't let you get into the plane. Even in the plane, no one will force you out the door at the point of a gun. Jumping is voluntary. Every skydiver in the world has experienced pre first jump nerves. Just go for it!