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ridebmxbikes

pushing w/l limits

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As long as there are zero winds at any altitude, you shouldn't have a problem jumping any big canopy, though you'll probably still be in the air by the time the next load starts opening... :o :ph34r:
"Mediocre people don't like high achievers, and high achievers don't like mediocre people." - SIX TIME National Champion coach Nick Saban

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As long as there are zero winds at any altitude, you shouldn't have a problem jumping any big canopy, though you'll probably still be in the air by the time the next load starts opening... :o :ph34r:



:)
Loaded question, big cause for concern here, Billy is spot on!

But exit wheight 150 ?? How much do you actually wheigh? Big boy rigs can add up to 35 - 40 lbs! ?

And there are never (Don't take my head off here,) there are never no wind days!

This in statistics would be known as an outlier, and allthough something about this seems ok, my gut is telling me that somewhere this is very bad??? Although for the life of me I can't remember why??? At the moment.

C

Not that I support cameras and jumping in the same sentance, but take some pictures, I'd like to see this??? :)
Are we playing around with the Brian Germain disscusion point here?? Am I wrong or is this the issue which drove him to start making airlocks?

Good luck, please stay safe! :)
But what do I know, "I only have one tandem jump."

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I have jumped a 320 big boy student rig exit weight of 170. Still above .5/1 but it was not a problem. Front riser forward speed was pretty low.
If there is no wind, not a big deal. Just slow. If they let you do it, go for it.

Also jumped a 350' BASE canopy in Twin Falls. Not a problem. Exit weight was probably about 160. Swooped it and everything. NBD.

-SPACE-

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Tandem rigs sometimes get jumped solo, such as when someone is becoming a tandem instructor or is getting current again after a long time. While sizes do vary, some common ones are 365 or 370 ft sq.

You just wouldn't fly something at a super low loading in turbulent or high winds. (High uppers aren't that bad ... as long as you can spot.)

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This isn't really any different than Tandem Instructor candidates who must make at least one solo jump on tandem equipment before taking eval passengers (unless that's changed since I tugged on 421 toggles).

Just check your winds aloft to be sure you won't end up in the next county.
Chuck Akers
D-10855
Houston, TX

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Bwahaha! Are you thinking what I'm thinking?

The big rig they put me on when I started was a 300. I'm down to a 230 now, which is just about 1:1 for my exit weight. I've lost a fair bit of weight since July!

But I was thinking, hmm, I could grab that 300 sometime in the summer, do a high pull at 11000 feet and see how long it takes to get down. That might be fun! Or... it might be boring. Heh heh.

It kind of sounds like what you really want is a paraglider.
I'm trying to teach myself how to set things on fire with my mind. Hey... is it hot in here?

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I do want a paraglider but i live on stupid flat ground. Thats why i want to try a really big one, just to see how long i can keep it up!



Pff! That didn't stop my hang gliding group in North Carolina! They had a rig they built out of a motorcycle wheel and a couple thousand feet of steel cable. They'd find a runway somewhere, mount the glider up on the rig, and haul the rig down the runway, flying the glider like a kite in the process! Once they got to altitude, they could catch a thermal and fly off -- my instructor made it 40 miles to the coast one day and landed at the Wilmington International Airport! I guess technically he wasn't supposed to do that, but it's a lot easier to ask for forgiveness than permission. Heh heh heh.

A couple guys over at the airport fly powered paragliders around. That looks fairly neat, too.
I'm trying to teach myself how to set things on fire with my mind. Hey... is it hot in here?

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This isn't really any different than Tandem Instructor candidates who must make at least one solo jump on tandem equipment before taking eval passengers (unless that's changed since I tugged on 421 toggles).

Just check your winds aloft to be sure you won't end up in the next county.



.......................................................................

Last spring I did a solo jump wearing a Sigma container and an Ikarus 330 canopy.
That was part of my training to earn a Sigma TI rating.

Mind you, I already had more than 4,000 tandem jumps on canopies made by: Jump Shack, Parachutes de France, Performance Designs, Pioneer, Strong and a Russian-rigger-who-did-not-speak-English ....

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