SivaGanesha

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  • Main Canopy Size
    190
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    172

Jump Profile

  • Home DZ
    Skydance Skydiving
  • License
    A
  • License Number
    65419
  • Licensing Organization
    USPA
  • Number of Jumps
    154
  • Tunnel Hours
    4
  • Years in Sport
    3
  • First Choice Discipline
    Formation Skydiving

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  1. I mostly agree but slight nitpick: he didn't actually say that no one was hurt. He said only that no one was killed. I assume, reading between the lines, that no one was hurt--but he didn't actually say that.
  2. Thanks for the added detail on license numbers w/CSPA. Now that you mention it, I remember I heard before about the gap that was left when the requirements changed. I didn't do PFF w/Bob. My home DZ back then was SWOOP then at the same airport. I did the SL/IAD progression at SWOOP (they switched from SL to IAD right during my student progression). After getting off student status, though, I occasionally jumped at Bob's DZ at the same airport.
  3. I believe that in both the USA and Canada, each category of license numbers starting from 1 (when licenses started in the 1950's or so) up to the present time. So your B license number will be based on the total number of B's issued to that point--which won't be the same as the total number of A's issued up to when you got your A, etc. I remember that when I jumped at his drop zone back in the 1980's, Canadian DZO Bob Wright signed my logbook as "E-8". Back then CSPA (but not USPA) still issued E licenses, but they were rare even then, and "E-8" meant that Bob had only the eighth CSPA E license ever issued. There may be some exceptions for example the honorary D-20000 of late President George HW Bush (who DID make a few civilian skydives but not enough to qualify for a non-honorary license of any flavor, let alone a "D").
  4. Thanks! That makes some sense but I'm still a bit confused. The site you are referring to as the 'new' website has existed since at least as early as 2015 according to web.archive.org . The 'old' website specifically shows the year of 2019 at the top of the page, suggesting it is still being updated (at least as of earlier in 2019) and is still showing current info (at least as of earlier in 2019).
  5. Does anyone know if Lodi still offers courses that lead in any way to a USPA A license or any other type of recognition by USPA? I was checking out their website and I was quite surprised to see the name of an instructor listed there who I understood has been kicked out of USPA: Accelerated Training Program Is USPA in any way lending an air of legitimacy to whatever goes on at Lodi these days?
  6. On this map are the red dots supposed to represent before Cooper jumped and the blue dots after he jumped? If so they seem to be off by one minute since I think he jumped at 20:13 but the 20:12 dot is already shown as blue. Anyways I don't quite understand why a jump in this terrain is so often described as unsurvivable. The closest communities to the location of the aircraft at 20:13 seem to be Heisson and Battle Ground. The elevation of Heisson is 440ft and the elevation of Battle Ground is 295ft. Doesn't sound that mountainous to me. A jump in this area should have been survivable. It doesn't make sense to me that this terrain is often described as so mountainous that Cooper could not have survived.
  7. While I don't deny that it was so at some point in the past, I think what you describe is further back than 30 years ago. My first jump was nearly 36 years ago at SWOOP (South Western Ontario Organization of Parachutists) then in Grand Bend, Ontario, Canada. Student jumpers at SWOOP jumped Sierra round canopies, not military surplus gear. And SWOOP was actually a bit behind the curve. The other DZ at the same airport--Grand Bend Sport Parachuting Center--was already using ram air canopies for first jump students even as far back as 1983 IIRC. I wouldn't describe every landing under a Sierra round as being like "someone hitting me with a lump hammer". Some landings were like that, but those were definitely landings on which I didn't do a good PLF. The openings under Sierra rounds, however, were much harder than anything I've experienced under a modern square canopy (once I progressed under the S/L student system to delays long enough to have a Sierra opening at terminal).
  8. I'm curious why you'd say that. Cooper is generally described as being in his forties in 1971. In my view, the accuracy of your statement above would depend on whether he was in his early or his late forties. If he was in his late forties, and old enough to have served in WW2, then your statement would definitely be true, since I believe the vast majority of young men in that generation did serve. If he was in his early forties, though, he would have been too young for WW2 but also probably too old for Vietnam. Yes, he might have served in Korea, but that is a much smaller group than WW2 veterans, so I'd question the "almost certainly" part of your statement.
  9. I just read a news article at recordnet.com. Can't easily cut and paste the link since I'm on my mobile device right now. But according to that article the answer to your question is 'yes': Bill was very much open for business today. "It's hard to have fun at 4-way unless your whole team gets down to the ground safely to do it again!"--Northern California Skydiving League re USPA Safety Day, March 8, 2014
  10. But you also bullshitted the guy...presumably because you, too, also grew up in North America. I mean--you told the guy that you wanted him to show up at the next karaoke party. If you truly don't feel like sex is such a dirty shameful thing, why did you stop short of a direct invitation to your apartment in the next 10-20 minutes? You are claiming that you embrace a certain "European openness" but your behavior is definitely that of "North American mixed messages". Just saying'. And his age has nothing to do with it--I'm probably 10 years older than you but my reaction to your behavior is no different than it would be if I were 10 years younger than you. "It's hard to have fun at 4-way unless your whole team gets down to the ground safely to do it again!"--Northern California Skydiving League re USPA Safety Day, March 8, 2014
  11. Hello, I wanted to ask the "greenies" why my message posted to the following thread: "Fatality - Ontario, CA - 27 April 2008" dated: "Apr 30, 2008, 7:50 PM" was censored and sent to the Recycle Bin? I recall at the time there were some concerns expressed about the content of the message but I was trying to express my condolences in the best way I knew how--and I didn't fully understand either the concerns or the actions you appear to have taken. This concerned a thread in the 'Incidents' forum regarding the first ever fatality at Skydive SWOOP in Dundas, Ontario, Canada involving a skydiver named Ahmed. Perhaps I never properly introduced myself when I initially joined these forums so let me do so now. My first jump was on May 28, 1983 at Skydive SWOOP--then known as the South Western Ontario Organization of Parachutists in Grand Bend, Ontario, Canada. Back in the day I made 81 jumps on a log book I no longer have, but subsequently returned to the sport in the USA and completed my A license at Skydance Skydiving. I'm not current at the moment but recently did 90 minutes in the tunnel and expect to get back in the air soon. Although I didn't personally know Ahmed, his death--being the first at the DZ where I initially started--cause me personal grief. The censorship of my message seemed to me to cut me off from an ability to share that grief with other members of the skydiving community, and I feel I've earned the right to understand why you did that. More recently, I've lost several friends of mine I did know personally at Skydance Skydiving and have attended their ash dives/funerals. Just trying to understand what was going on since this censorship felt weird to me. Thank you! "It's hard to have fun at 4-way unless your whole team gets down to the ground safely to do it again!"--Northern California Skydiving League re USPA Safety Day, March 8, 2014
  12. Seems to me that the real question with regard to Charles Manson is this: If it were necessary to grant Roman Polanski immunity from US prosecution so that he could enter the US to testify against Manson so as to keep Manson behind bars--would you do it? "It's hard to have fun at 4-way unless your whole team gets down to the ground safely to do it again!"--Northern California Skydiving League re USPA Safety Day, March 8, 2014
  13. Back in the day, at my first DZ in Canada, I was considered the coolest of dudes, and was known as the 'Iceman'. "It's hard to have fun at 4-way unless your whole team gets down to the ground safely to do it again!"--Northern California Skydiving League re USPA Safety Day, March 8, 2014
  14. It's not just a question of etiquette but more that each DZ is likely to have strict rules over when a student can and cannot get on the aircraft to make a jump and which instructors (AFFI's) may or may not jump with students. Waiving those rules will require the permission of the DZO unless you are the DZO. An unknown AFFI and an unknown student can't just hop on an aircraft together at any DZ in the country, no questions asked. On two instructor AFF jumps, waiving the standard DZ rules might require the cooperation of the other AFFI too in addition to the DZO. "It's hard to have fun at 4-way unless your whole team gets down to the ground safely to do it again!"--Northern California Skydiving League re USPA Safety Day, March 8, 2014