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howardwhite

What is this plane? #26

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The H picture in post 11 really looks like porter but it does not look to be the inside of a porter in the 1st pic? Are you saying tht is the same plane? It is not a currier or a stallion as was mentioned in the thread given the landing gear is different which leads me back to the porter again based on the post 11 pic.... I guess you could get picky and not call it a Pilatus Porter but maybe a Fairchild Porter?

Scott C.
"He who Hesitates Shall Inherit the Earth!"

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Stinson?


OK, time to clear up this mess.
Both pictures were posted on Flickr by Vince Marchese. We made a bunch of jumps together back in the day, including our mutual 100th.
When I posted the first one, I didn't know what it was. I then posted the other, which is a Porter; as the two are near each other on the Flickr page, I (stupid me) thought they were the same. It was an inadvertant red herring. They aren't.
After consultation with Vince, we agree the first one, inside the plane, is this Stinson, which we jumped at Norfolk, MA (and is which is now hanging in the Seattle Air Museum.)
What I remember about the Stinson (aside from the fact that it had no door and was really cold in the winter) is that there was a ball of putty above the instrument panel in which the pilot would stick the screws and other loose parts he found on the floor.

HW

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Stinson?


OK, time to clear up this mess.
Both pictures were posted on Flickr by Vince Marchese. We made a bunch of jumps together back in the day, including our mutual 100th.
When I posted the first one, I didn't know what it was. I then posted the other, which is a Porter; as the two are near each other on the Flickr page, I (stupid me) thought they were the same. It was an inadvertant red herring. They aren't.
After consultation with Vince, we agree the first one, inside the plane, is this Stinson, which we jumped at Norfolk, MA (and is which is now hanging in the Seattle Air Museum.)
What I remember about the Stinson (aside from the fact that it had no door and was really cold in the winter) is that there was a ball of putty above the instrument panel in which the pilot would stick the screws and other loose parts he found on the floor.

HW



Which Model? I was thinking Gullwing from the first photo. But the last one is hard to tell although it doesn't look like a Gullwing.
GUNFIRE, The sound of Freedom!

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N13477 is a 1933 Stinson Jr.-Sr. Reliant, powered by a Lycoming R680 radial engine. The small "cargo" door on the right side, aft of the wing was held open with a rod that we used to put a nail through! I'm like HW with a lot of jumps out of that bird in Norfolk, MA. in the late 60's.--Doc

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N13477 is a 1933 Stinson Jr.-Sr. Reliant, powered by a Lycoming R680 radial engine. The small "cargo" door on the right side, aft of the wing was held open with a rod that we used to put a nail through! I'm like HW with a lot of jumps out of that bird in Norfolk, MA. in the late 60's.--Doc



Thanks! Jumped a Gullwing and a Voyager in the mid 60s. Neither one anything to write home about as far as climb rate.
GUNFIRE, The sound of Freedom!

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