jonstark

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Gear

  • Main Canopy Size
    135
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    140

Jump Profile

  • Home DZ
    none
  • License
    D
  • License Number
    8298
  • Licensing Organization
    USPA
  • Number of Jumps
    2300
  • Years in Sport
    43
  • First Choice Discipline
    Formation Skydiving
  • Second Choice Discipline
    BASE Jumping

Ratings and Rigging

  • Rigging Back
    Senior Rigger
  • Rigging Chest
    Senior Rigger

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  1. jonstark

    Lew Jacobs

    He stopped by Pepperell this summer. We had a good visit. Great to see him after 30 years.
  2. Use the old rig to get current. There’ll be lots of time at the dz to look, touch, discuss your next rig. Spend your money on jumps for now. You can move your new Cypres over to a different rig later. Jon
  3. jonstark

    Buddy jumps

    We were doing them in the late seventies with “problem” students. Took a guy with a flat spin problem up a few times. What could go wrong? We didn’t know what we didn’t know. Yikes! Jon
  4. jonstark

    US DZ operating Skyvan or Sherpa

    The manufacturer has determined that their design and the materials used have a finite life based either on landings, hours or both. Unlike other aircraft neither they nor any outside agency has come up with life extending modifications. Jon
  5. jonstark

    Viso II Dive Type Selector?

    I bought one hoping that it might be able to keep track of my wingsuit flying time. Alas, as soon as I get into flight it thinks I have opened. I have it set for SLO. I am very disappointed. I don’t imagine it’s capable of monitoring deployment/inflation time. Jon
  6. In the olden times when the DC3 was the jump ship of choice there would be times when the base of a formation would exit well after the first jumpers had. The earlier jumpers would dive out but immediately turn around to track “up” to the base. Even though they had dived out the door they were still called “floaters” because they would have to float up to the base. Those following the base were the divers and invariably would leave facing the tail. Maybe your expert meant that it would always be best to present your belly forward toward the nose during exit rather than your back. Did he mean that you dive out head down with belly facing the nose? Probably. Jon
  7. jonstark

    US DZ operating Skyvan or Sherpa

    Many of the Skyvans are approaching their life limit and face mandatory retirement. DZs operating them are being judicious about utilization. The US military prefers to train out of tailgate equipped aircraft and the contracts are far more lucrative than dropping fun jumpers. Fewer and fewer Skyvans will be available for fun jumping. Sherpa are the preferred aircraft for military training but the expense of operating makes then unattractive to any civilian DZ. Acquiring one is well within reach for a big DZ but without ongoing military contracts just too much money to operate.
  8. jonstark

    What was your safest parachute?

    I had two. Both five cell mains. Strato Flyer then Kestral. Low aspect ratio. Opened well at any speed, fast or slow. Good for base or skydiving. Never a line twist. Never a worry. Of course I weighed far less so landings were a breeze. We all knew how to spot back then so getting back was rarely an issue.
  9. jonstark

    Wingsuits are for people that dont know how to fly

    You know and I know but does HE?
  10. jonstark

    Wingsuits are for people that dont know how to fly

    There are many ways to fly young troll. Some have explored the others and find wingsuiting to be another challenge among them. Now... tell me what the significance is of your avatar.
  11. jonstark

    Rebuilding a 182

    You oughta set up shop and show us all how it’s done!
  12. At our DZ we have a very large arrow which is a very strong suggestion to land in the direction indicated. It is located near the boarding area and can be changed whenever a consensus dictates. If a planeload is in the air and wind direction and/or intensity changes we radio up and change the arrow. When winds are light and variable rather than chase the direction with the arrow it is set to prevailing. Should it be wrong the consequences are usually minimal and jumpers may land away from the close-in or expert landing area in whichever direction they please. If winds are steady the arrow is boss unless you are swooping on your own pass or landing in the segregated high performance area. Landing in the expert area at any more than 45 degrees off the wind line may get a friendly reminder to please use the arrow. Of course, if a traffic conflict arrises, you may land in whichever direction is necessary to avoid injury. In which case discussion of the cause of conflict is warranted.
  13. jonstark

    1ST 100 way . When / Where

    The 72 way was at the end of the “wing wars” era. They were still pretty big and floppy though. Man oh man, was it ever LOUD rip tearing through the Florida sky!
  14. jonstark

    emergency procedures--keeping handles

    There have been numerous instances when an incomplete cutaway has caused main/reserve entanglement. To prevent this it is prudent to “clear” the cutaway cables from the housing by “sweeping” your left hand past them while still holding the cutaway pad in your right hand to ensure complete disengagement. Then throw the cutaway pad away! Free up both hands for reserve ripcord pull. Pull it and clear it too! Throw it away! Free your hands to deal with your reserve. Do NOT tell me you want to save having to pay for handles!!!
  15. jonstark

    Skydive near El Paso TX - A license

    Is that the dz west of town at Dona Anna?