superswooper

Members
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Gear

  • Main Canopy Size
    79
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    126
  • AAD
    Cypres

Jump Profile

  • Home DZ
    skydive spaceland
  • License
    D
  • License Number
    19862
  • Licensing Organization
    uspa
  • Number of Jumps
    6000
  • Years in Sport
    10

Ratings and Rigging

  • IAD
    Instructor
  • AFF
    Instructor
  • Pro Rating
    Yes
  • Rigging Back
    Senior Rigger

Recent Profile Visitors

286 profile views
  1. I see, that explains the logic behind throwing into the spin. I’m thinking with my paramotor reserve the plan will be throw hard to the side and behind, not up or down, into the spin. These systems are bagged with very loose line stows that are intended to pay out quickly. So they are a least somewhat staged. I still wonder if a pilot chute would improve reliability. Maybe not. As it stands now, these reserves are far from reliable. The best thing is to avoid scenarios that are likely to result in a reserve throw. Guys who engage in the riskiest of behavior often carry 2 throw out reserves. I appreciate all the input.
  2. That’s pretty consistent with what I’ve seen on some videos. So what is the rationale behind throwing into the spin? Down or to the side makes more sense than throwing into the main, but throwing into the spin seems counterintuitive.
  3. Thanks Mark. Believe it or not, the paraglider/paramotor crowd still use remarkably similar systems. YouTube videos have me thinking there is room for improvement in both training and technology. It looks like people are having trouble throwing into clean air. It seems like there are more main/reserve entanglements than there should be.
  4. What was the procedure for throwing an old no pilot chute belly reserve? Any old timers around who were trained on these, or better yet deployed one? I have a distant and fuzzy memory of someone saying that skydivers during that time were trained to throw the reserve into the spin, but I may not be remembering accurately.
  5. Condolences to my old friends back home at Frontier. Toma and I made our first night jump together about 15 years ago. Paul was flying. Chris Miller D-19862