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m529gft

Closing Loop tightness

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Having suffered a premature deployment whilst freeflying, I now make sure that the closing loop is nice and tight and shorten it accordingly. To be honest, I make it as tight as possible whilst still being able to close the container.

However, I was wondering if there comes a point where the loop becomes TOO tight?

Is there a significant risk of having a PC in tow as a result of an overly shortened closing loop?

Has anyone out there experienced this type of malfunction?

Thanks for any and all replies :)
Werewolves not swearwolves

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Don't overthink it, follow the manufacturers instructions for propper closing loop lenght in correlation with a fitting canopy size/containersize combination and focus more on pilot chute positioning, BOC condition, bridle routing and covering, preferably a freefly handle type of hand deploy with tuck tabs, pincover is sitting where it is supposed to be and actually sits tight and COVERS the pin... closing loop lenght and tightness plays only a small part in avoiding premature deployments...

Btw, a closing loop that is too tight can cause an array of damages from broken flap stiffeners, loosened grommets, damaged stitches and material all the way to broken riser covers and hesitations during deployment...
read and follow the manual and you probably won't have another premature deployment.
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To absent friends

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Like the OP, I have also suffered a pre-mature deployment caused by a loose closing loop. I had just installed a new canopy that packed smaller. It was a pleasure to close, but I decided to shorten the loop ...... sometime ..... in ..... the ...... near ...... future ....

A closing loop is too tight when you can pick up the entire rig by the bridle. In practice, few people can close rigs that tight.

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m529gft

Having suffered a premature deployment whilst freeflying, I now make sure that the closing loop is nice and tight and shorten it accordingly. To be honest, I make it as tight as possible whilst still being able to close the container.

However, I was wondering if there comes a point where the loop becomes TOO tight?

Is there a significant risk of having a PC in tow as a result of an overly shortened closing loop?

Has anyone out there experienced this type of malfunction?

Thanks for any and all replies :)


Yes. Happened to a friend of mine. How exactly did your closing loop tightness cause a premature deployment? I mean, I can see how pc pocket tightness would do it... But closing loop?

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lyosha

***Having suffered a premature deployment whilst freeflying, I now make sure that the closing loop is nice and tight and shorten it accordingly. To be honest, I make it as tight as possible whilst still being able to close the container.

However, I was wondering if there comes a point where the loop becomes TOO tight?

Is there a significant risk of having a PC in tow as a result of an overly shortened closing loop?

Has anyone out there experienced this type of malfunction?

Thanks for any and all replies :)


Yes. Happened to a friend of mine. How exactly did your closing loop tightness cause a premature deployment? I mean, I can see how pc pocket tightness would do it... But closing loop?

I've replaced the hacky sack with a tuck tab wedge under advice from senior FF fliers at my DZ. I've got pretty good bridle stowage too.

I'm trying to cover all bases, hence my enquiry with regards to the loop.
Werewolves not swearwolves

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>However, I was wondering if there comes a point where the loop becomes TOO tight?

Yes, that's possible. When it is so tight that a subterminal PC launch will not pull the pin, that's a problem. (Assuming PC and pin in good repair of course.)

However it is next to impossible to do that without special tools. In other words, if you close it with a pullup cord, it's going to be almost impossible to make it too tight. And even if you get it close to that tightness, the packjob will settle over time and loosen up a bit.

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billvon

In other words, if you close it with a pullup cord, it's going to be almost impossible to make it too tight. And even if you get it close to that tightness, the packjob will settle over time and loosen up a bit.



I don't know the spec for OP's container, but for my Vector the correct force is well below this description and riggerrob's pick-the-rig-up-by-the-bridle test:

UPT

The curved pin should be held firmly in place, but a force of no more than 12 pounds should extract it and open the container.



OP should follow the manual or ask the manufacturer for their recommendation. That also goes for things like whether the grommets should be stacked or offset.

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Quote

OP should follow the manual or ask the manufacturer for their recommendation. That also goes for things like whether the grommets should be stacked or offset.



Now when I think about it, I'm not sure I've ever seen packed rig with grommets aligned.
I figured main is either bigger than system or loosely packed.
And when the offset was too wide (more than half inch), it's been solved with longer loop

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Once upon a time I was working with an Aerodyne Icon. Since the manufacturer stated specific maximum and minimum pull force requirements for the main pin, I decided to use a fish scale to learn what that FELT like when packing. The bottom line was that I was unable to get to the maximum force when packing the main without rigger tools. I was barely able to get to the minimum.

Based on this, I suspect that most rigs have main closing loops that are way too long, albeit EASY to pack.

Of course, not all rigs are by Aerodyne, and other manufacturers may specify less main pin extraction force.

My suggestion is that you deterimine what (if any) extraction force the manufacturer of your rig specifies and then do some experiments at home with a pull up cord and an accurate fish scale. I expect that what you will determine is that the correct force is such that if you attempt to lift the rig by the bridle... the rig will move a little, but not lift off the floor before releasing the main pin.
The choices we make have consequences, for us & for others!

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