Brian425

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Gear

  • Main Canopy Size
    189
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    160
  • AAD
    Cypres

Jump Profile

  • Home DZ
    The Ranch, Gardiner NY
  • License
    A
  • License Number
    45378
  • Licensing Organization
    USPA
  • Number of Jumps
    72
  • Years in Sport
    1
  • First Choice Discipline
    Formation Skydiving

Ratings and Rigging

  • Pro Rating
    Yes
  1. I've been jumping a Safire1, 189 since right off student status. I am about 180-185 out the door with gear. As with all advice, check with your instructor. I love the canopy. It opens nicely and has never slammed me. I do not roll the nose. I never found the need to. For me, rolling the nose just made the opening alot slower. The canopy is responsive and consistent. It has a nice strong flare. I would recommend it as a novice to intermediate canopy. Buy it and fly it for a lot of years. Brian The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  2. My boys are 2.5 and 4. They come with me to the DZ. As far a conversations go, they understand that there are many things in life they can't do or have to wait until they are older. (driving, using the table saw, etc.) For me personally, I find it much easier to be as upfront and honest as possible. They know about my accident and that you can get "very big boo boos or die skydiving." I do not believe that they completely understand the concept of death; but, they know that dying means they will never see you again. I am comfortable taking them to the DZ and having them around skydivers. 99.999% have been incredibly kind and gererous to them. My only real issue is that they end up with far to many sweets and treats when they are at the DZ all day. And of course some of the interesting word and phrases they have learned. (fat bastard in Russian???) Let them see and experience life. Let them pretend to be or do everything and anything. That is how kids start to learn about the world. I will try to protect my kids from the "hold my beer and watch this stupidity." The rest, they will need to learn from watching others screw up and their own share of hard knocks. The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  3. Plain and simple, we need an agreed upon landing pattern. I personally don't care which direction you choose, into the wind, cross wind, down wind, any wind. Just agree on it an stick with it. It really makes it much easier and safer for everyone. The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  4. I would not worry about what other people say. If you are old enough to skydive, you should be old enough to deal with or ignore comments from other people. I took two years off from skydiving after my second son was born. I still only get to the DZ only 1 or 2 times a month. I am welcomed with open arms each time. I get good natured teasing about being the only responsible adult on the DZ; but, the key is it is good natured. As far as currency, I had a talk with my original instructor when I decided to take time off. Her comments were: 1) The sky will always be there. 2) Every weekend we have student jump safely. As long as I keep my jumps simple and continue to jump my big canopy (Safire 189) she saw no reason I can't make 3-5 jumps a month and be safe. 3) Sit in on the first jump class when I have not jumped in a while. I help her with the harness, etc and get a refresher. I also serve as the bad example. Life is about balance and choices. You need to find what fits your life. The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  5. Just seems like a great reason to keep doing business with them. Great product and great service. The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  6. Mike, Have you tried getting someone to help you reach out to Vigil. Maybe Sonic knows someone there. I remeber a guy from Vigil being at the Ranch once (maybe on a safety day); but, I cannot find his card. It's a small community, I am sure if you try, you can find a "friend of a friend" who works at Vigil. Personally I am not a fan of lawsuits. I know you are pissed to be out over $1000. I would be too. I am sure that for a small fee, you could get a lawyer to write them a letter asking for a refund or new unit. If I dig up the card, I'll PM you. B The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  7. Lisa can TRACK!!! Far and Flat and Straight My money is on her. Borrow the vidiot's jacket with the little wings. You will need it. I have $20 on Lisa. The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  8. For me, that guy is spread out among a couple of guys. #1 would be Larry Hoskins. Larry has always found time to jump with all the new belly fliers. He's dead serious about helping you improve; but, he always makes sure that every jump ends with some smiles. Larry has always been there to offer advice, help or anything else I needed. Thanks Larry. Then there is Brian Ball and Larry Thomas. Both great guys. Larry sets up the Scrambles and Rookie Challenge. Brian takes the time to jump with us low number guys. There are many more people I could name. John Skinner always has a smile and some sound advice, John Kiernan, Sonic answer all my rigging/packing questions. Tom Buchanan (Tombuch on DZ.com) was always there as a the voice of reason offering sage advice and standing up for the all of the jumpers. Both on a national level and at the Ranch. There are more; but, the post would get too big. Thanks!!! Brian The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  9. Seat belts and helmets. Too many people are belted in; but, have their helmet in their lap. I know the video guys and gals want to get the nice pics of the take off. But, please put it on for take off. The others are just lazy. What people tend to forget is that an unsecured helmet is just another thing to be flying around inside the plane in an emergency. The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  10. Pete, I took the class for the second time yesterday. I took it the first time at 27 jumps. I got a lot out of it the first time and even more the second time. Scott explains how and why things work in a very simple way. I think that EVERY person should take this class at some time during their first 50 or so. I will be looking to take the advanced next year. On the last jump of the day (the bad spot), the winds changed a little . So the low pass people made it back. I turned a little the wrong way and landed about 3 miles from the Ranch. I made a nice landing in a horse farm. 6 other people from that load landed off. So the short buss was full of window lickers. lol I was so far from the DZ, I was the first skydiver to land there in the 10 years they own the house. Yeah, they owe beer.
  11. It looks like he's hanging in a training harness. I don't really know what the contaner is; but, the Ranch has a hanging harness with some weights in it. It could be a similar set up. The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  12. Oh yeah, I almost forgot. Congrats!!!! The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  13. Does Pete still have the "A dead student is not a repeat customer shirt"? On your next jump, ask him if his cypress is on. Actually, I did my AFF with Pete. He's a great guy. Listen to him, he'll take care of you. Most of all, follow his always sage advice "Don't fuck up." The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  14. Daniel, This is a very hot topic. Personally, I think that a skydiver should not sue unless it is a case of Gross Negligence. Gross Negligence is a willful disregard for the safety of others or complete recklessness. I doubt that the waivers will cover prevent you winning a gross negligence lawsuit. I could be wrong. I will tell you about me. On 8/7/04, I landed out and hit a tree. I had around 35 jumps or so at the time. It was a jump all about learning and I was with two people that I trusted. I was the spotter. Green light came on, I checked the spot and air traffic. The people I was jumping with watched what I was doing and felt comfortable that the spot was good. We landed off and I got seriously hurt. Who was at fault? The pilot put the green light on. The person at fault was me!! The green light was on because that was the pilot's best estimate of the start of jump run. I was the spotter. I chose to get out of the plane. I made the series of errors that caused my injuries. Personally, I would not sue a DZ. It's my choice. Make the choice to jump or not to jump based on what is in your heart. I would be more afraid of a DZ with no waivers than one with substantial waivers. It's a business and in the business of skydiving, the waivers very blunt. This is my story if you are interested. http://www.dropzone.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?post=1201916;search_string=tree;#1201916 The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.
  15. Great - Sonic and Donna at the Ranch Pro Shop. From my first day jumping, they have done everything they could to help. Answer stupid questions, answer difficult questions, provide shelter in the shop when I bring the rain. Their prices are good and they are great people. Bad - none so far. The only time you should look down on someone is when you are offering them your hand.