GeorgiaDon

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GeorgiaDon last won the day on March 4

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  1. It's worth remembering that the only really consistent Trump policy was to cancel every program, treaty, policy, or law from the Obama administration, and replace it with nothing. He cancelled the CDC's collaboration with the Chinese to monitor for emerging viruses, with the result that we were unaware of the Covid outbreak for months. He ignored the national pandemic response plan that was developed after the H1N1 outbreak, and failed to develop any national plan of his own. He went so far as to tell states they had to order their own PPE, setting up a scenario where states had to bid against each other and drive up the price, then he seized shipments destined for blue states and sent them to states whose governors sucked up to him. It's true he did allow the government to fund fast-tracked vaccine development (though that was a "no-brainer") but then he failed to develop any sort of a plan to distribute the vaccines, and blocked the incoming Biden administration from getting the information they needed to develop their own plan. Apart from Covid, he cancelled the program for dealing with black lung disease, and replaced it with nothing. He withdrew the US from the WHO, leaving us with no mechanism for collaborating with other countries to deal with a world-wide pandemic. He withdrew from the Iran nuclear deal and replaced it with nothing, with the result that Iran stopped abiding by the deal and is now closer to a nuclear weapon than the have ever been. I could go on and on and on. Hatred of Obama is not a substitute for a national policy on anything. Hundreds of thousands of people died as a result, and people will be worse off for a long time because of Trump's obsession with erasing Obama from history.
  2. "Interesting" that you ignore fentanyl deaths while Trump was in office: (source) Pop quiz: who was president in 2017-2020? It seems to me that the current fentanyl crisis has a lot to do with the Trump administration failing spectacularly to do anything about it, letting it grow unchecked. Just like they failed to address the Covid crisis. Too busy building useless walls I guess. But no, it must all be Biden's fault. That's the ticket! At least the "base" will buy that, and that's all that really matters to some people.
  3. What is stupid is making health insurance a "perk" offered through the workplace, and sometimes only to management. In the civilized world health insurance is universal. One consequence of that is that businesses are not burdened with having to pay for insurance for any of their work force.
  4. It's not a coincidence I think that the rights Thomas targeted for "correction," are the ones the Catholic church opposes.
  5. I hope that all the states so eager to ban abortion will be every bit as vigorous about compelling the fathers to bear their share of the costs of caring for the kids they generate. No getting out of it by declaring bankruptcy either.
  6. The basic problem here (as I see it) is the in the absence of actual laws, passed by Congress, the SC can interpret the Constitution as it wishes. It can recognize a right one day and take it away the next. Rather than wasting time trying to remove people from the court, which is realistically not going to happen, they should work to codify rights in the law and if necessary in constitutional amendments. That work will certainly be a long term project, but it should be possible if the rights have broad public support.
  7. I consider myself to have above average judgement on a lot of things, but that just informs my conviction that I have no business telling others how to live their lives.
  8. Selling contraceptives, providing information about contraception, and even discussion about contraception used to be illegal in the US under the Comstock Act, passed in 1873. Although this law was invalidated by Griswold v Connecticut (1965) it will become active again if Thomas gets his way and Griswold is overturned. It will require new legislation specifically removing Comstock, and that will likely be opposed by conservatives. At the federal level new legislation to restore privacy rights will have to overcome the filibuster which may be a challenge. This reflects a more general problem: old laws that are invalidated by SC decisions are generally not removed from the law books, they just become zombie laws that can't be enforced. If the SC ruling is later overturned the zombie law springs back to life. Some states had abortion ban laws before Roe v Wade and these are now in full effect even if the state no longer supports enforcement, which gives an avenue for conservatives to push their agenda even in some blue states.
  9. If religious schools must be publicly funded, I wonder if that means they will also be bound by the state curriculum and employment rules? Will they be required to teach about evolution, and not (or not just) the Book of Genesis? If they accept public funds, can they still teach hatred towards LGBTQ people, or refuse to hire teachers based on their sexual orientation? I foresee further cases making it to the SC. I also expect (given the leaning of this court) that any effort to require schools to teach actual science, or to avoid teaching hate, will be struck down as infringing on "religious liberty". In the eyes of this court "religious liberty" means evangelical Christians are protected from having their feelings hurt, which means everyone else will have to abide by evangelical Christian rules regardless of their own beliefs.
  10. I'd throw the primary system into the mix. That ensures the extremists (in both parties) control who gets to run for election. Combined with gerrymandering, the primary system ensures that its mostly the loonies that get to run the show.
  11. I'd suggest taxing windfall profits to encourage investment in refineries, and to encourage oil companies to invest in green energy alternatives.
  12. When female skydivers are arrested and charged with child endangerment for skydiving while pregnant, will that be enough to get male skydivers concerned about the issue? Once a fetus is legally recognized as a person, all sorts of activities with even a small element of risk will potentially become felonies. Women will be held hostage by their biological status as incubators.
  13. "I could stand in the middle of fifth avenue and [ strikethrough ]shoot somebody[ /strikethrough ] smash my wife's head in with a flower pot, and not lose any voters."
  14. I agree with all this. I remember years ago when same sex marriage was being discussed here in speakers corner, someone pointed out that the Scandanavian countries include marriage under contract law. That seemed like a great approach that highlights the distinction between the legal and the religious aspects of marriage. Unfortunately in the US people seem to be mostly unable to see the distinction, so they interpret same sex marriage as an attack on their religious beliefs.