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CookieMonsta

Quick AFF Stability question

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I just went through my Cat C-1 AFF course; the first attempt I had to re-try due to a weird right hand spin built into my freefall preventing the instructors to release me. I went up again the next day with thoughts that it might have been in my legs, so I focused on them and had the instructors make sure they were perfect. This time was much better however there was still a slight right hand turn built in... they were able to release me and I was stable however there was that slight turn present.

My question, how loose should my upper body actually be? The instructors believe that I may have been a bit too 'stiff' even though I thought I felt fairly relaxed. They said that checking my altimeter could be causing it also, but I dont really move my arms when I check it.
I would like some opinions of this and if anyone else had this issue while learning? What did you do to overcome it and become more stable?

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Relax.... and then relax some more. :D

So you just finished your C-1 and went through the jump twice. So you've got what now, maybe 4 minutes of freefall time? Can you think of any other new skill you've learned in your life that you mastered in 4 minutes?

It's best to rely on your instructors for feedback - all we can really tell you on the internet is to do that, since we're not in the air with you.

It will add cost to your jump, but if you can get an outside videographer to go up with you, it can give you an extra tool for debriefing after the jump and making corrections. But really, your instructors are best able to help you point out the things that aren't neutral in your body that are causing you to turn slightly.
"There is only one basic human right, the right to do as you damn well please. And with it comes the only basic human duty, the duty to take the consequences." -P.J. O'Rourke

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Oh I am completely relying on what they say its just nice to hear opinions elsewhere. I do exactly as they instruct. And I also had my C-1 that I had passed put on video, however its on the DZ computer and we didnt upload it anywhere so no video for you :P
However, on the video my body positioning looked good. Even on my first attempt the instructors could not isolate the issue.

My question was really "How loose should upper body actually be" with back story as to why I needed to know this and then another question being "Has anyone else experienced it and what did they do to fix it"

Sorry, not trying to be an ass especially since im new (both on these boards and to skydiving) but thats the standard cookie cutter answer i see here on these message boards!


And I think ive got a total of 3:50 of freefall time, not including the one tandem I have done!

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However, on the video my body positioning looked good. Even on my first attempt the instructors could not isolate the issue.



Very slight problems in body position will cause a turn, sometimes so slight it's hard to see on video.

For example, stand up with your feet together, and notice how little you need to lean one way or the other before you fall down. Being stable in freefall isn't a matter of being locked into a body position, it's a matter of fidning your 'balance', and keeping it.

Take another look at the video. Is your head on a swivel keeping an eye on your heading? Correct me if I'm wrong, but you're supposed to be holding a heading and if you're turning, your head should be off to one side or the other as you try to keep an eye on your heading. I'm willing to bet your head is front and center, watching the world go by.

The neat thing about your neck is that it attaches your head to your body, and 9 times out of 10, your body will follow your head. If you want to hold a heading, look at your heading and even if your body wants to drift one way or the other, just the act of turning your head to maintain eye contact with the your heading will often times correct the turn.

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The neat thing about your neck is that it attaches your head to your body, and 9 times out of 10, your body will follow your head. If you want to hold a heading, look at your heading and even if your body wants to drift one way or the other, just the act of turning your head to maintain eye contact with the your heading will often times correct the turn.



+1

This applies for everything from walking, driving, flying, skydiving... everything!
"I may be a dirty pirate hooker...but I'm not about to go stand on the corner." iluvtofly
DPH -7, TDS 578, Muff 5153, SCR 14890
I'm an asshole, and I approve this message

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The head bone connected to the neck bone,
The neck bone connected to the back bone,
Oh, hear the word of the Lord!

Dem bones, dem bones, gonna walk aroun'
Oh, hear the word of the Lord.

:D:D


To the OP:
Dave's got good stuff there.
My reality and yours are quite different.
I think we're all Bozos on this bus.
Falcon5232, SCS8170, SCSA353, POPS9398, DS239

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Something as small as being a little pigeon toed can cause that slight turn. I had the same problem when I was doing my AFF. I repeated Cat C-1 4 times and we just couldn't figure out what was causing the turn. I went to the wind tunnel and the tunnel instructor identified the problem almost immediately and I had it fixed in less than 10 minutes.

Also, tensing up anything can cause unintended turns. If you tense up one hand you can feel how that in turn makes that whole side of your body tense.

You'll figure it out. Good luck and remember to relax.

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I know this is an old post (& hopefully an issue that you solved in may or june), but I am posting this in case anyone else with the same problem reads this. I had the exact same problem. My instructor finally figured out it was my legs when she had me do a mock dive on the ground & examined my body position. Turns out my legs are usually uneven. I think it is likely due to a torn hamstring from a waterskiing accident years earlier.

First thing to do is talk to your instructor & ask them to examine your position on the ground. Next, if you are unsure of what it is, you can usually still correct a spin by adjusting your leg position. i.e, a small adjustment of your legs can make up for a misplaced palm or arm IMHO.

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