popsjumper

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Gear

  • Main Canopy Size
    190
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    181
  • AAD
    Cypres 2

Jump Profile

  • License
    D
  • License Number
    999999999
  • Licensing Organization
    USPA
  • Number of Jumps
    100000
  • Years in Sport
    99
  • First Choice Discipline
    Formation Skydiving
  • Second Choice Discipline
    Freeflying

Ratings and Rigging

  • AFF
    Instructor
  • USPA Coach
    Yes
  1. popsjumper

    New. Collapsable pilot chute uncocking itself.

    Rarely seen that where it actually uncocks the PC. Color disappears? yeah but that doesn't mean it's not cocked...it means you should check it for sure.
  2. popsjumper

    Logging Your Tings

    I'm a tree hugger. Started out trying to squeeze something more than "formation" on those skinny lines in the logbook. Gave it up... Jump 30 pull at 1.9. Jump 31 pull at 2.2 etc., etc. Later years we had those fancy ones and wrote paragraphs for a thousand or so, then... Jump#x - 36-way Jump#x - 120-way Jump#x - Cutaway. Thanks, Chad. Jump#x - Gas station at Fitz Jump#x - Bail at 1.7 Jump#x - Sit Jump#x - Coach A. XYZ Jump#x - AFF L1 A. XYZ with Dave K. Jump #999999999 - Ga. POPs record Fitz Nice to end it on an upswing.
  3. popsjumper

    New to the world of skydiving

    Welcome to the Big Blue Skies! You are a long way from choosing gear. Don't worry about that until well after your training. You have more important things to worry about right now....training?. We wouldn't normally start buying equipment until right around the time we get our first license...you'll know more about what you want and all the options by then.
  4. popsjumper

    Looking to start this winter!

    Welcome to the Big Blue Skies! You're going to a lot of answers along these lines: - Equipment Forget about equipment for now. You will be provided with all the equipment you need for training and for quite a few jumps afterwards. You have no idea about equipment choices at this point...you'll want to learn bout it before you invest in something that is not going to suit you. Too many young jumpers have made that mistake. -Friends Yes and no. Some DZs will offer Observation Rides, some won't. Ask your DZ. What I, as an AFFI Instructor, will advise is to forget about this until well after your training. You're going to have a lot to think about and a lot to do in training and I would not want you to be distracted away from what's important. I would not allow it if I was your instructor. Save that cash! You're gonna need it.
  5. popsjumper

    Returning to the Sport after 10 years away!

    Funny how once you get bitten, you STAY bitten, Welcome back!
  6. popsjumper

    Teaching flat turns

    Here's how I teach it to youngsters: You'll need flat turn skills to avoid collisions and set up landing patterns. For the first exercise, we'll talk about a static left (L) hand. Exercise 1 Flying full head, go to half brakes Keep the L hand at half brakes (static) and raise R hand to full flight. - you note a steep L turn. Now using the R hand, brake to 1/4 - you note the turn to the L has slowed and is less steep Now using the R hand, brake to 1/2 - you note the turn has stopped and you are flying straight again Now using the R hand, brake to 3/4 - you note the turn has gone to the R now and is not very steep Now using the R hand, brake to full brakes - You note the R turn gets faster and steeper. Slowly and evenly return to full straight-ahead flight. Exercise 2 Repeat using R hand static at 1/2 brakes and L hand operating That's the basics. Note in the exercise above, you used a static 1/2 brake scenario. You can do the same exercises using any static level of braking. For example, go to full brakes and start your static adjustments from there. However... In reality, flat turns are dynamic in that you use both hands to adjust turn speed and steepness of the turn. Note that minimum steepness equates to minimum altitude loss. Less steep, less altitude loss. You can pull to any braking position, and use the R hand to adjust up or down while at the same time use the L hand up or down to adjust speed, steepness and direction; both hands work together. For example, you could be in a medium speed L turn and change that by using either hand to change direction, speed, and steepness: - To reduce steepness, L hand up OR R hand down. - To increase steepness, L hand down OR R hand up. Ideally, what we are looking for is maximum turning range and minimum steepness (minimum altitude loss). Exercise 3 Go to half brakes and use both hands, up and/or down, to adjust turning direction, speed and steepness. You goal is to find out what works best for you to maximize turning speed and minimize altitude loss....and practice, practice, practice until it becomes second nature to you. Hope that helps. .
  7. popsjumper

    Hey all

    Congrats! Yep, you got it bad.....just like all the rest of us. Wait.....you're in HAWAII and complaining?????? Congrats!
  8. popsjumper

    Triathalon Line Set

    Something else you need to be aware of about Triathlon line sets... Brake line configuration: Original vs 4.0 Mod Here's one thread about the differences: http://www.dropzone.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?post=1150133;search_string=mod%2BA;#1150133 Do a search on "4.0+mod" (no quotes) More threads about it.
  9. popsjumper

    Landing off

    FIFY Because of this: IMO, giving razz for landing off, agreed, is not the thing to do. The thing to do is give them razz about exit decisions, spotting, and flight path screw-ups. Re-teaching those things can do wonders for those who will listen and learn.
  10. popsjumper

    Flight suit question

    Wait until after AFF training. Your AFF instructors will be putting you in suits that THEY choose. The suit you buy now, may or may not be appropriate for AFF. If it's not, you won't be able to use it until you get cleared for self-supervision anyway. Plus, by waiting, you'll have more opportunity to learn about what's available and get input from others on quality, customer service, options, price differentials and the such. Plus, by waiting, you'll have a better idea on what type of suit that will best enhance your flying for discipline and fall rate.
  11. popsjumper

    Fledgling AFF grad

    Congrats! Let the fun begin!!!! I can certainly agree with the AFFI's comment. The first time I got on a big way, I was a bundle of nerves. But then I watched a couple of guys with 8000+ jumps screw up and I thought to myself, "Well, hell, self...if THEY can screw up there's no need to be overly worried about ME screwing up.
  12. popsjumper

    Greetings! One question

    HA! The U.S. recommendation is 200 jumps. No, you are not getting the BS. It's all about safety. One you start actually learning about skydiving, it will all become clear to you. There are some U.S. DZs that ignore that recommendation and put cameras on a student's hand...in a glove type mount. What's the problem with having another jumper with a camera fly with you?
  13. popsjumper

    Student Retention post A license

    Can you be more specific on what the requirements, the thresholds, are for Australia? Specify what BRELS are? As you already know, here in the U.S., A license can jump with any other licensed jumper. What would be helpful to those who don't already know is what's required of your jumpers to meet the same. Pre-licensed students can only jump with an accompanying AFFI, Coach or D-licensed jumper approved by the DZO. Here are two A-license checklists (DZs are free to use either one or the other) that students are required to know and do in order to gain that A license and earn the option of jumping with any licensed jumper. IMO, people are going to come and go at will and there's not a lot we can do to entice people to stay. The exception to that is when their decision to leave involves, DZ drama and problems with interpersonal relationships at the DZ. This is a DZ culture thing and the DZs that have the friendliest culture have the best chance of retaining young jumpers, IMO. DZs, individually, have their own retention problems caused by that exception. It's might be tough to get info on these things from DZs....few are likely to admit to these kinds of problems. The most common reason for leaving that I have seen is costs. The cost of gear, traveling and the slot. Some DZs, those that require paid Coaching, add to that cost factor. Yes, we should try.
  14. popsjumper

    "seller" does not want to refund my money

    Let it be known who, what, when and where and maybe somebody that knows him can convince him to do the right thing?
  15. popsjumper

    Dealing with mistakes

    Sometimes our brain is working on other stuff and doesn't register stuff that we could be thinking about. May I say? IMO, your BIG mistake was landing on your butt. I'm sure you were taught how to PLF. It sounds like you were not taught why we PLF or you didn't give the teaching a significant level of importance. Landing on your butt exposes your spine to injury. That injury could be severe...all the way up to paralysis. Practice your PLFs. Wouldn't it be a good idea to be able to do it properly before you needed to do it?