dudeman17

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dudeman17 last won the day on October 14 2020

dudeman17 had the most liked content!

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  1. Well, no and yes. My comment was a tongue in cheek response to gowlerk's comment that the 'greatest movie ever' was Fandango, ostensibly based on that scene. I was saying that 'Proof' was the greatest. 'Proof' was director Kevin Reynolds' film school project when he was at USC. When he wrote and directed 'Fandango', he inserted that script into it and re-shot it with his new actors, including the young Kevin Costner. And yes, he used the same guy for Truman Sparks. I still use the 'two shots at that mutha' line in my fjc's.
  2. There's a pretty limited market for parachutes. If that store used Cossey for repacks, it's possible that they also got used gear from him, possibly the ones Hayden bought. Not saying that's what happened, but it's not far-fetched. There were two chutes found left on the plane, the unused backpack and the 'real' reserve that he cut lines from. Each should have a packing card. Was there a third card found? I know there are some different numbers in the reports, but I don't think I heard of a third card?
  3. That one could be expected. Cutaway was written, produced, and directed largely by skydivers.
  4. Maybe but not necessarily. Changing or moving a ripcord handle isn't that unusual. If indeed Cossey used that rig for putting out students and wanted to get the handle further from their potential grasp, that would make sense. The BS part is that it would make the rig 'too difficult to use'. As you and I have both said, if that was the case, he would never give it to a pilot (such as Hayden). It would be too easy to change it back. Also, as I said 'over there', if indeed that handle was mounted 'outboard', that could be the very reason that Cooper chose that rig. It would better get the handle out from under things he may have tied to his chest.
  5. Yes you did. I think that's also his seaplane with him flying it. If I remember the story right, supposedly Tom Cruise learned to skydive at Deland while he was in Florida filming Days of Thunder. I guess he liked Bill and thought his beard was filmogenic, so he found a place to use him. I knew a guy who used to work for one of the major film set catering companies, one that Cruise requested on his sets. Cruise knew my friend was a jumper, so a couple times when they were on location, Cruise had him (secretly) find a nearby dz he could jump at on days off.
  6. That's right, I stand corrected. Actually, after I wrote that, I figured you'd correct it by saying "...and back".
  7. I can see kleggo kneeling in the road, fingers stroking his chin, checking conditions, temperature, winds, choosing his bike the way a pro golfer chooses his club. Ha! I remember when he would ride his bike over the Ortegas from Pendleton to Perris.
  8. You're getting good advice on here, especially about the reserve size and working with your local instructors and canopy coaches. But, as zombie said, if it's truly too good of a deal to pass up, then buy it and stick it in your closet until you're ready for it. If you also buy something else more appropriate in the meantime, you shouldn't have too much trouble re-selling it when you're done with it. There are always people coming up behind you that will need it.
  9. That's interesting stuff, Flyjack. I have to chuckle a bit, you say you don't see the FBI as involved in a coverup, but what you describe sounds a lot like that possibility. It raises a couple questions, though. And I don't say this in any way to refute your theory, just curiosity. If they cover Hahnemann for Cooper, yet shortly thereafter they convict and jail him for the next one - why? Wouldn't the same circumstances apply? Maybe they cover him for one, but when he does it again, they say 'we can't keep doing this'? But if that's the case, then why not go ahead and out him as Cooper? And why does he do it twice? Does he need more money? Did he lose the money in 'Cooper'? If he did, might that contribute to the Tina Bar find? A lot of possibilities...
  10. Like I said, I was just making conversation based on the recent exchange. We don't know who or what the Cooper case was. Which means we don't know what it wasn't. It could be simply for cash. It could be the most intricate conspiracy in history. It could be just for cash, but everyone involved 'had' some things on each other. We just don't know for sure, and fifty years later, maybe we never will. The vortex spins...
  11. Well, I don't know, but for the sake of conversation I'll hazard a guess. I don't think Flyjack is saying that Hahneman is absolutely Cooper. I think he's saying that H is a better suspect than any other, so he's working that angle. The key statement I see in this exchange is... If Hahneman was Cooper, and the FBI came to know that, but the public wasn't supposed to know because... ...then I could see where the FBI just doesn't say anything about him, which seems to be the case. But since the Cooper case is so prevalent in the public eye, then the FBI has to keep up the appearance of 'looking for Cooper', but they never get anywhere, which also seems to be the case.
  12. Yeah, the WTI and the W outside video. By the looks of the video and their website, it looks like they're taking paying customers.
  13. That picture of Himmelsbach - He's got a tub of popcorn. Is he in a theater watching the Treat Williams movie?
  14. Regarding the tie... Obviously it is not known, so this is speculative, but... I have to lean towards a thrift store purchase. As careful as Cooper was with all the other evidence, it seems an unlikely mistake to leave something behind that could be traced back to him. Or to anyone who knew him.