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indyz

First freefall trouble

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I just wish I could get up there to test out this new belief. ;)

That's all it took for me. My first step-through was caused by bringing my arms in, something that should have been easy to correct. The next two unstable jumps were caused by nervousness and lack of confidence in myself. I took 3 weeks off, and practiced my arch laying on my bed everyday. When I did finally get back to the DZ, I was confident and nailed my 5 second on the first try. Since then I've made it up to the 20 second delays without having to repeat anything.
You know all of the technique, and once you get confident, get back in the plane and try it again.
--
Brian

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> Why would a DZ have a training program that includes 2-5 tandems followed by single instructor AFF dives?
Because they have a shortage of AFF instructors.
I worked in a similar program - at Hemet, California - for many years. Most of our continuing students did three tandems - with progressively more tasks - followed by ground school and a few single-instructor AFF dives. It took most students two or three tandems before I was willing to recommend them to the freefall instructors. Then they usually did pretty good on their freefalls.
We also found that students scored better if they spent all day Saturday in the classroom, allowed the material to sink in overnight and did their first freefall Sunday morning.
In comparison, first-time AFF students usually flailed.
The number of static-line students dwindled so badly that we were not training enough to cover the cost of maintenance on the static-line equipment at Hemet.
The vast majority of first-timers only plan on doing one jump, so it is quicker to send them up with a tandem instructor and the DZO does not have to worry about whether they will handle a malfunction correctly or land in the river, etc.
Currently, I am working in the Progressive Freefall Program in Canada.
Many of our students start with a tandem jump to get them over that first huge psychological barrier, Then they do the First Jump Course and a couple of IAD jumps from 3,000'. Students that demonstrate stable exits and reasonable canopy control on their own get recommended to the PFF instructors who run them through a couple more hours of ground school followed by jumps with two instructors from 10,000'.
The major advantage of PFF is that it is a series of small blocks of instruction. We start out with simple tasks, then build on sucesses, gradually expanding the students' skill set.
On the other hand, during the rainy season we revert to the traditional IAD-to-short-freefall method. This is mainly a weather limitation because during the rainy season we can often climb to 4,000' or 6.000' but 10.000' is often complicated by clouds.
There are many paths to the same goal. Choosing a path depends upon which system instructors are familiar with and what other skills students bring to the first jump course.

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e150
OFF-TOPIC
If I were a millionaire I would have done an AFF but with four instructors -only blonde females from Sweeden with at least 3000 jumps- so each would hold my hand and my feet as well. Hmmm maybe five of them.
ON-TOPIC
Well there are some folks like me who really would have done an static-line or an AFF course. But I did a static-line course with a ROUND chute and have not complained about it I was happy and I am happy to jump. But you know lets forget it
let all be happy because
WE KNOW HOW DOES IT FEEL TO JUMP OUT OF A PERFECTLY GOOD AIRPLANE
Maybe I have some problems with my freefal, does not matter nobody is a pro at the first time. Regarding the AFF imagine that you should have learn what you know by someone only talking to you at the dropzone explaining only. Later please remember it exactly during the first of your jumps. Well not easy. You can see videos, pictures but yourself in the air that is a different picture.
Forget it I am just jealous.

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