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Found 36 results

  1. VolkairJordan

    Mister Sharky ready to go

    © southsidebase

  2. VolkairJordan

    IMG_7664

    © southsidebase

  3. Jumper Justin

    Whats it like running a dropzone?

    Hey everybody, I'm pretty new to the sport but I love skydiving but before my passion for skydiving started my passion for business mechanics was and still is going strong. I'm really curious what the day to day operation looks like behind the scenes, what are some of the biggest hurdles you have to overcome to start a dropzone? What's the most difficult part of keeping a good dropzone up and running?
  4. skydivefretoy

    Skydive Fretoy

    Skydive Fretoy is the closest skydiving center from Paris. Come fly with us We're offering tandem skydiving, skydiving lessons & solo jumps for proflyers. We're opened every weekend starting from Friday noon and during weekdays according to our opening schedule. Please contact us for further information and reservation at +33 3 44 43 68 39. Visit also our website. Blue sky! The Skydive Fretoy Team
  5. MCHENRY -- Tandem skydiving may come to the Garrett County Airport if the Pittsburgh Skydiving Center Inc. meets four requirements set by the Garrett County Commissioners on Tuesday. Saying an agreement should be no more restrictive nor more liberal than others operating out of the airport, the commissioners agreed with the recommendation of the Garrett County Airport Commission. Director of General Services Gary Mullich presented an official request from the Pittsburgh Skydiving Center in December for a formal lease agreement with the airport by Jan. 31. The commissioners approved the request but did not agree to a waiver of liability insurance. The county does not have any building space to lease to the center, and area for land lease would need to be added to the Airport Layout Plan and approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. Electricity and water are not provided to land lease tenants; they provide their own. "You would have to have a good reason to deny anyone the use of the airport," Mullich said, since it receives federal funds. The skydiving center would have to give the county a hold-harmless agreement and would have to have an agreement with the county if it uses the airport as a base of operation. Don Bick of the skydiving club, which operates out of Connellsville (Pa.) Airport, met with members of the advisory group in December. He would like a standard three- or five-year lease, beginning May 1, with an option to renew. The group is interested in leasing appropriate building space or installing a mobile office. The county requires $1 million general liability coverage. The skydiving group has $1 million in premise or "slip and fall" insurance, and $50,000 in third-party insurance for all licensed skydivers through the United States Parachute Association, but says it cannot get general liability coverage, Mullich said. Bob Railey, a local pilot, said the group seemed to have a pretty smooth operation at Connellsville. He said it might be possible for them to just use a trailer as an office on weekends. He felt it would be an attractive business for the county and could not see any airplane operations vs. skydiving issues that would hinder either activity. Ken Wishnick, president of the Garrett County Chamber of Commerce, said the skydiving club had joined the chamber and asked if any staff members wanted to jump. "A few are actually considering it," said Wishnick. "I would love to do this myself," said Deb Clatterbuck of the chamber. "You would be jumping with a jump master," she said, stressing safety must be first. The addition of the skydiving, Clatterbuck said, "would be an inclusion of another adventure sport and of course, the increased amusement tax received off that." Also the number of take-offs and landings at the airport would help make it eligible for an increased runway. "Dick assured us the jump would not interfere with any planes coming in, and would not take up much room at the airport," said Caroline Hill, co-manager of the Garrett County Airport. "He said they were quite busy up in Connellsville. They haven't had any problems, but there are a lot of questions to be answered. "Some local people have supported him and I think there is an interest," she said. She is worried some about parking problems because of the participants and curiosity-seekers the event would draw.
  6. admin

    Kapowsin Air Sports gets 2nd setback

    Operators of a skydiving school at Kapowsin Field, a residential airport in rural Pierce County, recently received their second setback in eight months when an administrative law judge recommended against renewal of a liquor permit. Kapowsin Air Sports owners Geoff and Jessie Farrington had been ordered last August by a Pierce County Superior Court judge to scale back their thriving skydiving business at the airport, 10 miles south of Orting. The Farringtons have gone to the Washington State Court of Appeals to contest that land-use-permit decision. The more recent rebuff came in the form of a permit ruling released April 25. Administrative Law Judge Ernest Heller recommended the state Liquor Control Board deny a permit renewal requested by Kapowsin Air Sports. The board is expected to issue a final decision in a month or so. The Class 4 special permit is the type required at a private banquet. It doesn't allow alcohol sales but permits the school to serve alcohol for free. "It appears that consumption of beer following a day of skydiving is the expectation of many skydivers," Heller said in his ruling. "The beer consumption seems to have developed into an uncontrolled potluck party." Jessi Farrington disputed that description. She said a few drinks at the end of a dive day is a 50-year tradition among skydivers. "People who are making decisions are not experiencing any of what's going on here," she said. Arguments on the subject were heard last December and in March after Pierce County land-use officials objected to the renewal request. County officials said a liquor license is not allowable at the airport, which is zoned for rural residential use. The skydiving school has been controversial among airport residents for the past few years. Some residents, as well as Pierce County officials, think the 23-year-old school has outgrown what it set out to be. The Farringtons bought 110 acres in the rural area, built the airport and opened the school. Over the years, pilots and skydivers bought portions of the airport, which now features 27 residences. The skydiving school started in 1978 with 2,000 jumps a year and the level of activity has grown to 20,000 jumps. Farrington said Heller's ruling won't affect her school, but said, "it's going to affect the social aspect of it."
  7. A judge in the next few weeks will render another decision in an ongoing feud among owners of the Kapowsin Airport, divided over a skydiving school operating at the facility. At Lakewood City Hall on Wednesday, state-assigned Administrative Law Judge Ernest Heller presided over a second public hearing on the skydiving school's request for a liquor license renewal. The case draws a line between Kapowsin Air Sports and Pierce County officials, who oppose the school serving alcohol at the privately owned airport, which is zoned for rural residential use. A resident group, Citizens for Kapowsin Airport Safety, is supporting the county. "The county's position is, in the R-10 zoning, a liquor license is not allowed, period," said Stefan Kamieniecki, a county planner. He said the county missed its chance to oppose the original license, granted in 1999. An adverse decision would be another blow to the skydiving school owned by Geoff and Jessie Farrington. In August, Pierce County Superior Court Judge Frederick Hayes ruled in favor of airport residents who want the thriving skydiving business scaled back. Hayes told the Farringtons to apply for a conditional-use permit for their operation. That would give Pierce County the power to limit operations at the jump center, 10 miles south of Orting. The couple's appeal of the decision is before the Washington State Court of Appeals. The liquor license at issue is a Class 4 permit that allows the school to serve alcohol to its skydivers free of charge. "It would allow us to sit around a campfire after the jump and drink beer," said Jessie Farrington, owner of Kapowsin Air Sports. She said the school has such a get-together twice a week on average with about 15 people gathering each time. Even though residents privately own the airport, the state requires the liquor license because the school is open to the public. Farrington said the skydiving business will survive without a liquor license, but said she wants to keep the tradition of after- jump get-togethers. She said the county's opposition is a way for it to shut down her business. Not so, Kamieniecki said. The county's intention is to bring the growing school into compliance with codes and regulations, he said. The Farringtons bought 110 acres and built the airport in 1978 to continue the business Jessie Farrington's father started in the 1960s at Pierce County Airport, formerly Thun Field. Pilots and skydivers gradually bought portions of the airport, and 27 families live there now, many with their own hangars next to their homes. The skydiving school started in 1978 with 2,000 jumps a year. It has grown to 20,000 jumps a year. A few years ago, some residents brought up concerns about liability and safety. A feud over the school split the airport community. Jeff Dow, who has lived on airport property since 1983, has been leading the group opposing the skydiving school. "The jump center has grown beyond its authorized capacity outlined in the original permit," Dow said. "It's a liability to homeowners. They are a hazard to homeowners due to the increased traffic and skydiving activities." The three-member state Liquor Control Board has the final say on the liquor-license renewal. The board will review Heller's ruling, along with all evidence and testimony, before deciding the matter.
  8. Skydive Sibson re-launches as Skydive Airkix for the 2008 season and offers £15 jump tickets for regular jumpers. It’s all change at Skydive Sibson, now known as Skydive Airkix. 2008 promises to be an amazing season at the UK’s oldest and most respected drop zone where over half a million successful skydives have been made since it started as the Peterborough Parachute Centre at Sibson Airfield. Joining the Meacock family, who founded the club in 1971, are two new partners. David Turner has purchased 50% of the centre and will manage the business. Airkix plc becomes a 20% partner, and will introduce new systems and coaching programmes to the drop zone (DZ) utilising skills learned in one of the most successful vertical wind tunnels in the World. There will be cross-benefits for Skydive Airkix jumpers and customers of the Airkix wind tunnel in Milton Keynes. There are also other major changes happening at Skydive Airkix. Following a fire that burned down the clubhouse in 2006, a brand new, purpose-built bar, restaurant and clubroom is planned to be open in time for Easter this year as the new season kicks off. To haul jumpers, Skydive Airkix has a completely overhauled 16 place, fast climbing, turbine-powered, LET 410 that is permanently based at the DZ. The aircraft, which comes with a complete set of spares, is owned by two of the Skydive Airkix partners. Best of all is the new simple pricing scheme for experienced jumpers who can purchase a ‘high’ (max altitude) ticket for just £15, this is considerably cheaper than at other UK drop zones. New coaching programmes will make Skydive Sibson the centre of excellence for freefly as some of the best flyers in the UK work seamlessly between the Airkix wind tunnel and the drop zone. First time students wishing to learn to skydive will also find the Skydive Airkix programme quite unique through a specially designed AFF (Accelerated Free Fall) programme that utilises effective wind tunnel simulation and training. A normal AFF course of 8 jumps currently offers about 6 minutes of freefall time, a Skydive Airkix course will start at a minimum of 16 minutes and the gold programme over 60. The centre will be offering low price tickets in unrestricted airspace up to 15,000ft, allowing jumpers to get more airtime in a shorter period for less money. In a new move to the skydiving industry, Skydive Airkix will be the first DZ to offer jumpers the opportunity to Carbon Offset. By adding a voluntary £2 to each jump ticket, Skydive Airkix will pay into a recognised established offset programme. The new clubhouse complex will feature a restaurant serving meals at all times of the day, a fully stocked bar and comfortable areas for jumpers and visitors. In addition, free Wi-Fi will be available as well as bunkhouse accommodation, camping and shower facilities. For further information visit: www.skydiveairkix.com
  9. Numerous people have asked me how to start and maintain a club in the past, so I have put together a little (or not so little) essay on how to do this. I started the skydiving club at the University of Maryland, College Park in September 1998. It has grown quite a bit since then and there is much more active participation by the members. The beginning of a club is very strenuous on the founder, as there is a lot of legwork and red tape to get through. But, someone has got to do it. Each school works differently for how a club could be formed. Anyway, you could find our constitution at: http://www.inform.umd.edu/StudentOrg/cpsc/Documents/Constitution.doc I thought that you could use that as a standard constitution to see what you could put into your constitution. Each school has different rules on what should be in a constitution but for the most part, they are all the same. You should see if you your school would actually permit such a club (skydiving) on campus. I say this b/c I have a friend who tried to start a club at U. Delaware and they didn't let him b/c the school takes on a different role with the student clubs there. At U. Delaware, the university has control over the club that they would be liable for any incidents. At U. Maryland, we are considered a student organization/club, NOT a sport club and the university allows us to do pretty much anything b/c they don't have any liability over us. The only thing that we must abide by are the basic university rules (non-discrimination, etc.). Okay, so I could only tell you how I started the club here at U. Maryland as I don't know how it works at other universities. We needed to fill out a student organization form that required a President's and Treasurer's signature. Moreover, it required a minimum of 7 other undergraduate students to sign and put their social security #'s (Student ID's) on it. Finally, we had to have an advisor sign it. The advisor could be anyone who is faculty/staff of the university as long as they are not an undergraduate student (I'm UMD's advisor now as I finally became a graduate student and TA for the university). Most professors are kind of wary about signing a form to be an advisor for a skydiving club. Therefore, you might need to go to your Office of Campus Programs (that is what it is called at UMD) and request some literature to show to the potential advisor on what they are liable for or what they are not liable for within the club. After you get them to sign the application and you have the signatures/SID #'s of other students and the constitution done, you hand it in to the Office of Campus Programs. It may take a little while for them to approve it as they need to read your entire constitution and pick out the details that need to be changed. After they approve it, you might want to apply to the Student Government Association (SGA) to be a club under them. They may require you to change the constitution a little according to their policies but this is usually a standard procedure and the Office of Campus Programs should be aware of it already. So, you end up filling out another application to the SGA with some student signatures and Student ID #'s (25 minimum in UMD's case). After the SGA approves it, you may have to just be a SGA club without funding from the SGA for the first year. Again, it depends on the school. Anyway, the treasurer or whoever you have as the contact person would get a notification that a budget is due if you are requesting funding from the SGA. You need to fill out a budget with items that you wish the SGA would fund you for. I find the best way to get the SGA to fund a skydiving club is to orient everything around SAFETY as you stress that you want to keep all the skydivers in the club safe. They rarely refuse this. But, if you choose to itemize the same exact item without using the terms safety, they may reject your request. For instance, if you want to get some funding for equipment, you could call it "Safety equipment", which you may have to put under "Contractual Services" (as that is what it would be considered at UMD. Another example would be time in the wind tunnel, which you could call "Free fall Safety Training". This would also fall under "contractual Services". At UMD, they have a few different categories that you could itemize things under such as "Transportation", "Advertising", "Contractual Services", "Subscriptions", and "Dues and Fees". "Transportation" would be the use of a motor pool that your school may have (i.e. van). "Advertising" would be something such as an ad in the school newspaper. "contractual services" typically means paying for a "lecturer" to come (in skydiving, it would be an instructor or some other skydiving expert). Or you could use "Contractual Services" for stuff such as Safety Training (as in my example of the wind tunnel). Moreover, you could designate the "Contractual Services" to alleviate the initial cost of 1st timers. The SGA would also be happy with this as you tell them the entire goal of the club is to get more students into the sport of skydiving and introduce diversity among the club while keeping it as cheap as possible. "Subscriptions" would be something like a subscription to "Skydiving Magazine" in the name of the club. But, this would be rejected if you don't have a centrally located office where students could come to. "Dues and Fees" would refer to the club membership fees to USPA ($200 the first year and $100 every year thereafter). The money from the SGA doesn't usually go directly to the club, but rather an invoice may need to be required by the company, which you want the SGA to pay with the Federal Employee # and mailing address for the check. The university may take a while to process this and send it to the company that you want the money to go towards. Our university is big on "Safety" and "Diversity". So, you could tell the SGA that you are trying to make the club as diverse and safe as possible, so you need their financial assistance. If the SGA says no, they are just pricks. You could make your club a "sport club" by contacting your school's "Campus Recreation Services" department and talk to them about it. They may fund you after a year of recognition or so. This funding may include club gear (rig, etc.) and owned/maintenance by the Campus Rec. Services. But, at UMD, it ends up being a huge hassle b/c the Campus Rec. Services requires meetings every week, a lot of paperwork, permission for the club to leave the state (our dropzone is in a different state), and permission to spend money where we want to. The only advantage of becoming a sport club is that the Campus Rec. Services may potentially buy us gear. Of course, this all depends on the school. Next thing you might want to consider (depending on the drop zone's waiver and the university's policies) is a legal waiver for your members to sign. You could get this done through the Student Legal Aid Office that some schools may have on campus. We started using the legal waiver when we first started but that got phased out b/c the drop zone's waiver covered us, as well as our club is just considered a "referrer" as opposed to a profit organization. A website helps the club enormously in getting information out to the public and to the students who don't quite understand what skydiving is about. You should have descriptions of the types of jumps (i.e. Tandem, AFF 1, and Static Line), prices of the jumps, and pictures of what each type of jump looks like. Also, you should have directions to the drop zone, contact information for possible students, events calendar, FAQ section, statistics on how skydiving is safer than driving your car or even walking on a treadmill. You could take a look at our club's website to get a general idea of what information you may want to have on your web page at: http://www.umd.edu/StudentOrg/cpsc You need to choose which drop zone will handle your club. You should call all of the local drop zones nearby and tell them that you are apart of a club at a university and you want to set some prices that are discounted dramatically from the regular price. If you are apart of a big university, you could tell them that and that you are potentially able to get hundreds of 1st timers each year. Also, you may want to work a club membership fee into the price of the 1st jump. That way, the club could make some money towards other things (i.e. boogies, gear, etc.). You could even have a "referral fee" worked into the price but that is your choice. Basically, you should have the total price be lower than the regular price by a good amount, which will increase your potential of getting students to jump through your club. Another thing to consider when choosing the drop zone is the type of aircraft they have. Drop zones with little Cessna's may not be able provide the necessary service for large groups. Also, if you were to charge a membership fee to people who are jumping through your club for the first time, you may want to give them something back in return such as a "free" t-shirt, sticker, etc. that would cost the club $5 per person. This money would be met up with the money from the membership fee. Anyway, this item that you would give the student would also allow you to get advertising on campus. A t-shirt would be worn around and others may ask that person about it. Then, they would probably direct those people to your club. You should choose 2 - 4 jump dates throughout each semester to start off with. That way, if someone can't make it 1 of the dates, they could make it to another one. Before each jump date, you may want to have an "information session" meeting somewhere on campus. In the meeting, you should go over what each type of jump is like, the costs, the places to sleep/shower at the drop zone, safety, clothing to wear on the jump, what skydiving feels like (not roller coaster type of feeling), pics/video of people who already jumped who are in your club, etc. The pics/video of professional skydivers are good to get the students interested but it is also good to have some of the experienced skydivers at the university. That way, the students would realize that it is very possible that they could become good at the sport while having a good time as you started out the same way at some point. You may want to have the club pay for some pizza, which sometimes is an initiative to get people to go to the meetings. It is okay b/c it will pay off as people will become interested in skydiving through the meetings. You could make this meeting as formal or informal as you wish. You might want to have some gear there to explain the different components of it along with its safety devices (i.e. AAD and RSL). Moreover, you might want an instructor from the drop zone come and make a speech about skydiving and the drop zone itself. Just remember this, the students are going to be very nervous and scared about their first jump, so keep that in mind when giving a speech in these meetings. Don't make any skydiving jokes mocking death. In fact, explain to them that skydiving is safer than most acts of daily living. But, still keep their attention by telling them that you are a student too and like to have fun. Just don't act cocky about it as the students will think that their safety would be in jeopardy. The most important key to these meetings is to smile and act extremely excited about the sport. The students will draw off of your enthusiasm and you will have more students wanting to jump despite the costs! Besides these information meetings, you should have general club meetings with the active members. You should discuss advertising issues, budget issues, etc. with them. This way, you all could brainstorm for more ideas as well as it would get the other members more involved with the club. This way, you don't have to do all the work. You could delegate the work so it is easy for everyone including yourself. Advertising: You should plaster the campus with fliers in the most NOTICEABLE areas. For example, at UMD, no one put fliers up on the bathroom doors in the dorms nor in the elevators until after I started doing it. Students notice these fliers while ignore the most used flier spaces (i.e. kiosks). You may want to make quarter sheet fliers and pass them out at a place on campus that many students frequent (i.e. Student Union or Dining Hall, etc.). Make the fliers have a dark background with light colored writing (i.e. white letters). This also, makes it more noticeable. Try not to have too much text on the fliers as students would just glance at it. You may want to just put "SKYDIVING" in large letters with information on the next jump or meeting along with your website. Other ways of advertising are pretty much infinite. You could put an ad in the school newspaper, put an ad on the football stadium's TV screen (or basketball), have some demonstration team jump onto campus with a banner trailing behind them, set up a table in front of the student union with pics of skydiving on a poster on the front of the table, co-host a happy hour with a local bar, or just email all of the presidents of other organizations (including frats/sororities) with information on your club. Fund raising would predominately be through your membership fees or referral fees. But, you could always purchase t-shirts or stickers, etc. with your club logo on it and sell them at a reasonable cost. If you have any more questions, please feel free to email me at: Lgershen@umd.edu Blue Skies, Soft Landings, Lewis D-25265
  10. ELOY (September 14, 2005) - Skydive Arizona, an Arizona-based company that is one of the world's largest drop zones and skydiving centers, announced that it has filed a lawsuit against Cary Quattrochi and Ben Butler, the principals in 1-800-SKY-RIDE. The complaint filed in federal district court in Arizona alleges violations of federal law prohibiting false designations of origin, false or misleading descriptions of fact, and false or misleading representations of fact in commercial advertising. According to the complaint, the named defendants misrepresent the nature, characteristics, qualities, and geographic origin of their services and commercial activities. The complaint also alleges claims of consumer deception, unfair competition, and trademark infringement. The complaint alleges that the defendants have more than 900 websites purporting to offer skydives and related services at locations in Arizona and elsewhere, which are allegedly used in a common plan or scheme to deceive consumers and to perpetuate a scam on the public. The defendants are alleged to have a website that misrepresents the defendants as "Arizona Skydiving," "Skydiving Arizona," and as the "Skydiving Arizona Center" in the State of Arizona. According to the complaint filed by Skydive Arizona, the 1800Skyride represent that their facility at "Skydiving Arizona" is "the busiest skydive center serving Arizona," that they "run multiple turbine aircraft," and that they have "multiple large screen TV's in our hanger for you to use and watch your video for the first time," when in fact the defendants have no such aircraft, hanger, large screen TV's, or skydiving center in Arizona. Skyride allegedly have websites for fictitious skydiving centers in Phoenix, Tempe, Scottsdale, Mesa, Glendale, Gilbert, Yuma, Flagstaff, Chandler, Peoria, and Tucson, which are alleged to falsely represent that defendants have a skydiving center at each such location. Skydive Arizona has alleged that the defendants have one or more websites that include photographs of Skydive Arizona's aircraft which are misrepresented to be photographs showing defendants' aircraft. The complaint also alleges that many of the defendants' websites include a photograph of skydivers taken at Skydive Arizona, which is allegedly represented to be a photograph of the defendants' experienced staff of instructors, and the same photograph is allegedly misrepresented as the staff at defendants' fictitious skydiving centers in Green Bay, Wisconsin; Springfield, Illinois; Nashville, Tennessee; and Atlanta, Georgia. The complaint alleges a nationwide scheme to mislead consumers with websites for fictitious skydiving centers throughout the United States, while it is alleged that the defendants have no such physical facilities, instructors, or aircraft at the locations represented on the websites. Consumers are allegedly provided with a toll-free number to call to make reservations to skydive at the defendants' fictitious skydiving centers, and the telephone calls are allegedly routed to a telemarketing center in Georgia. The complaint also alleges that the defendants on at least one occasion fraudulently diverted telephone calls from a legitimate skydiving center to the defendants' telemarketing center after the owner of the business died, and while the decedent's widow and children were attempting to sell the business. Also named as defendants in the suit are the Atlanta Skydiving Center, Casc Inc., 1-800-SKY-RIDE, and 1800SkyRide.com. Skydive Arizona is represented by Sid Leach of the Phoenix law firm of Snell & Wilmer, L.L.P. About Skydive Arizona, Inc. Skydive Arizona has grown from a business established in 1978 by Larry and Liliane Hill, at a time when they owned a single Cessna 182. Operating under the name "Skydive Arizona" since 1986, the business has grown significantly, and is now recognized as the world's largest skydiving center. Skydive Arizona tallies over 150,000 jumps annually at its facility in Eloy, Arizona. Skydive Arizona provides state-of-the-art training, world-renowned instructors and staff, pilots, videographers and coaches, and has established an international reputation in the skydiving industry. For further information, contact Betsy Barnhouse at Skydive Arizona, 4900 Taylor Road, Eloy, Arizona 85231; telephone: (520) 466-0493. Also see: The SkyRide Virtual Network Scam What can we do about Skyride?
  11. On December 18th a DC-9 jet landed at Perris Valley Airport in Southern California marking the latest addition to the largest fleet of skydiving aircraft on the West coast. The DC-9 is an ideal jet for skydiving because the rear steps can be removed making for a clean exit out of the rear of the plane while in flight. Owner Ben Conatser said it will take several months to get all of the FAA paperwork processed but you can look for the plane to be flying during special events here at Perris Valley Skydiving and on the boogie circuit later this year. Ben's son and co-owner, Pat Conatser, said that he had been keeping an eye on DC-9s for sometime, waiting for the right deal to come along. He said they are quite fortunate with the plane they found because it is in such good shape both mechanically and cosmetically. "Really the bulk of the work needed to get this bird ready to fly jumpers is administrative." In addition to flying sport parachutists, Perris Valley Aviation plans on using the DC-9 for movie work as well as military training.
  12. wlie

    FAA ruling grounds Bay Area Skydiving

    BYRON -- With warm Indian summer weather still lingering, the Byron Airport would have been busy this weekend with people eager to jump out of airplanes -- with parachutes, of course. But the tiny airport and its biggest business, Bay Area Skydiving, has been quiet since Tuesday. No planes have arrived or departed. The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday placed a flight ban at all airports within 10 nautical miles, or about 11.5 miles, of several nuclear facilities in the United States. Byron is near the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. "It's dead out there. Obviously nothing is happening," said David Mendez, manager of county airports. The ban does not extend to police, fire and other emergency crews who might need to land at the airport, Mendez said. The ban ends at midnight Wednesday. The tiny Tracy Municipal Airport is also feeling the pinch, particularly at the Tracy Flight Center. It has been unable to run since the ban began. Steve Dietrich, the flight center's office manager, said the ban has cost the school money. Mike Tjaarda, owner of Bay Area Skydiving, estimated he's lost between $15,000 and $20,000, and turned away at least 40 first-time jumpers since Tuesday. "We're continually turning down business," Tjaarda said. "Some of these people are going elsewhere, which is an unfortunate thing for us, and it's bad for the county, too, because they're not spending their money here." Though the ban has been tough for Tjaarda, he said it was a small price to pay to own his own business and to be a part of the nation's fight against terrorism. "If my country needs me to do anything, that's fine. We're Americans first. If that means I have to find another job, I will. We're Americans first. It's not all about making money," Tjaarda said. East County commuters who store their planes at Byron Airport, and who get to work by air, have been forced to use alternatives. Discovery Bay pilot Rick Mann said the ban has forced him to drive to his Hayward business and postpone business trips to Fresno. He also had to forego a flight on Halloween to Marysville, where he planned to take his daughter trick-or-treating. "The big thing is not being able to get back and forth to work. The plane is actually stranded there. We can't move it," Mann said. Randy Howell, who owns eight Russian MiG-17 jets and two Boeing L-39 fighter jets, said the ban has not affected his business. He stages air shows around the country which are mostly held February through October.
  13. On September 7th, Skydive Arizona celebrated a ground breaking ceremony for the largest SkyVenture Wind-Tunnel ever, to be located right on the dropzone. Since then, construction has been underway for the only 14 foot tunnel that will satisfy flyers of all flying styles, using four 400 hp engines. Construction is expected to be complete in less than 70 days. There are many advantages to having a larger tunnel. This 14 foot diameter chamber will provide extra room for novice Relative Work flyers to practice 4-way. The additional room will increase the comfort level for newer tunnel flyers as they gain experience and adapt to the confined space. A total of 1,600 hp will easily lift Freeflyers and enable them to sharpen their skills within a few flying sessions. SkyVenture Wind-Tunnels have successfully proven themselves as extremely effective training-tools over the last years. Skydive Arizona’s world-champion staff will cater to your training needs and bring out the best in you. Competitive skydivers will be able to jump during the day, relax in the afternoon, and tunnel fly at anytime that fits their training schedule. Tunnel coaching will be available from highly experienced Tunnel flyers, in RW, Freefly, Freestyle and “Funstyle”. Arizona Airspeed, innovators of the tunnel-camp training concept, will provide coaching at any level with at least one Airspeed tunnel-camp per month. The tunnel facilities will host a Health-center with Yoga, Acupuncture and Guided Meditation, to add to the already offered services of Massage, Reiki and Pilates at the dropzone. Come to the sun, take advantage of the largest fleet of skydiving aircraft, rely on the Arizona weather and fly with the best. Skydive Arizona is the mecca of skydiving, with over 150,000 skydives made annually. As a global destination point for travelers the inclusion of the wind tunnel only serves to put the crowning touch on the most complete full service skydiving resort in the world. Whether you are a competitive skydiver, or someone that is looking to hone their skills SkyVenture Arizona is here …for you!
  14. DELAND -- Skydive DeLand, the city airport's most prominent business, is under scrutiny by local factions of pilots and aviation businesses here who say the company gets preferential treatment from the city. Skydive DeLand has operated out of the tiny airport for 20 years, slowly building the city's worldwide reputation as a skydiving mecca. Its local lore has also grown, as a place with loud planes and reckless pilots that not only attracts thousands of skydivers from all over Europe and South America, but also lets them stay in campers, tents -- even a teepee -- on airport property. In recent months, people have complained about the "unsightliness" of the campground, and more than 100 people signed a petition asking the city to investigate the "dangerous" flying practices of Skydive DeLand's pilots. The complaints surfaced as city officials are trying to map out the airport's future and decide if it will remain a small, mom-and-pop operation or grow to accommodate corporate jets for the city's adjacent industrial park. "I think right now Skydive DeLand feels a little persecuted," said City Commissioner Charles Paiva, who is also a pilot who uses the airport. "People's perceptions are that [Skydive DeLand] does what they want to do and isn't very regulated. I think there needs to be some leeway given to a very good tenant that brings a lot of jobs and a lot of money. I don't want anyone to think we're giving anyone special treatment." Company drops plans Last week, Skydive DeLand dropped its plans to build a second RV park near its hangars and other buildings, which house a bar, a restaurant, a shop and indoor training classrooms. Owner Bob Hallett said the city was insisting on too many restrictions -- such as an audit by the city's code enforcement office every six months to make sure people weren't using the campground as a permanent home -- to make the RV park worthwhile. "It was not in our political or financial interest to continue the project," Hallett said. "What other RV parks have that type of restriction?" Under Skydive DeLand's lease with the city, the business is allowed to sublease the 18 spots in its existing RV park. It receives about $150 a month from each of those tenants. Some of those tenants have kept trailers on the property for years, but they are out-of-towners who use it as a skydiving headquarters rather than a permanent home, said Skydive DeLand manager Mike Johnston. Johnston told city commissioners last week that he doesn't understand what is prompting the complaints. "These complaints have surfaced recently and we're not doing anything different," he said. Johnston said his pilots are not reckless and, in fact, follow standard skydive flight procedures accepted nationally. FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said the agency is investigating the complaints about the pilots. Neil Brady, a private pilot who has used the airport for 18 years, is part of the faction that has complained about Skydive DeLand. "This airport has grown tremendously in the last 18 years," he said. "There's a lot of flying activity here, and they simply cannot fly the way they did 18 years ago because it's not safe. Their airplane is no better than mine or a student pilot's or anyone else's out here." Brady said he is also pleased the company decided not to build a second RV park because he considers the existing one an eyesore. That RV park and campground are part of what has made it a successful draw for competitive and recreational skydivers all over the world, Johnston said. Word of mouth across Europe and South America, say those who come here, is that Skydive DeLand is the place to train. 'Biggest skydive center' "It's known as the biggest skydive center in the world, really," said Simon Staalnacke, 26, of Norway. He arrived in town about two weeks ago with two buddies from Sweden and Norway. On a recent morning, the three sat outside the large teepee they've been sleeping in, lounging on an old couch that they say they inherited from the last people who stayed in the teepee. "The atmosphere is so nice here," Staalnacke said as his friend, Stefan Diahlkrist, strummed a guitar and sang Swedish songs. "Everybody is so fun and laid-back." Staalnacke and Diahlkrist are typical of the foreign tourists Skydive DeLand attracts. From DeLand, they intend to make their way to another extreme sport -- snowboarding in Colorado. Their teepee was one of seven tents set up in the yard next to the company's restaurant and bar, which boasts of a large number of imported beers to make their patrons feel at home. National skydiving teams from Switzerland, Sweden and Italy are training at the facility now, but are renting homes in DeLand rather than camping. "Florida is the mecca of skydiving in the world, and this has always been the No. 1 place in Florida," said Kurt Gaebel, who moved to DeLand from Germany to make a career as a skydiving coach. Along with new residents and tourists, several skydiving equipment manufacturers have set up shop in DeLand near the airport. The city estimates Skydive DeLand's economic impact on the city to be near $30 million, said Assistant City Manager Michael Pleus. Hallett, the company's owner, said he isn't surprised some airport users are getting restless from the growth, and says he also wants to keep the airport small. "I really don't blame them," he said. "They really want the airport to go back to the days when it was just them and their buddies. We don't like to see the change either." ~Orlando Sentinel
  15. SEBASTIAN -- Skydive Sebastian officials say they will now consider a city proposal to move their landing zone after initially objecting to the move. Jim Iannaccone, a representative of Skydive Sebastian, said the organization initially objected to the airport master plan, which requires the move, "because they hadn't had an opportunity to examine or discuss the viability of the northwest corner as a landing area." Iannaccone said Skydive Sebastian is now willing to look at the city's offer. "In light of the city's recent offer, Skydive is willing to look at and discuss the city's plans in the hope of finding a mutually beneficial solution," he said. In a letter to the city council last week, City Manager Terrence Moore said the city will reserve land adjacent to the northwestern landing zones if Skydive Sebastian decides to move its operation to the northwestern area of the airport. Recently, the Sebastian city council voted to pass the airport master plan, which requires the moving of Skydive's landing zone to the northwestern part of the airport. It was a move Skydive Sebastian officials initially objected to because they said it would inconvenience skydivers by making them travel 1,500 feet back to the main facility after a jump. Skydive officials said the move would turn away potential skydivers and hurt Skydive Sebastian's business. Skydive Sebastian officials also said it is important to have a landing zone adjacent to the skydive facilities to ensure Skydive Sebastian's survival. The current drop zone is adjacent to the Skydive Sebastian facilities. Jason Milewski, Sebastian Municipal Airport manager, said the northwest section of the airport has been deemed the safest spot by the Federal Aviation Administration for skydivers to land. Milewski added it would be safer because skydivers won't be landing near the east-west runway when the runway is reopened. City officials argue that leaving the drop zone where it is now would endanger skydivers because airplanes would be taking off and landing nearby. ~ FLORIDA TODAY
  16. For those of you not aware, Air Ventures Skydiving is now Atlanta Air Sportz. Sandor Vali and myself are the new owners and we're looking forward to serving our skydivers with a new dz and a new persona. Our goal is to build a skydiver's dropzone! Our single objective is to promote our sport and to provide skydiver's with a place to hang out and have fun. Whether you have 10,000 skydives or 1 skydive ... you're a "skygod" to us. You will find no clichés or attitudes at our dz ... those things are intolerable here. We just want to enjoy skydiving and keep it relaxed and enjoyable. As everyone is aware, skydiving in Rome, GA has had it's trials and tribulations. Well NO MORE! Rome has had both a good and bad reputation in several aspects. Well now it's ALL GREAT! At our dz, you will always get 13,500' skydives with no hassle and everyone eager to meet your needs. Skydiver's come first! Over the next couple of months, you will see many changes at Atlanta Air Sportz including the additional covered packing area as well as a huge observation deck. One thing that is different is children are welcome. We will be building a playground specifically for your little ones. Yea ... you read that right. What a concept ... huh? A family atmosphere is what we're going for here. A new BIG building will be coming soon. Other additions include the completion of the swoop pond, a full service rigging loft to address all of your rigging needs on site, as well as other additions specifically for the "up-jumper". We will also be providing packing classes as well as license prep classes on a regular basis. USPA certification courses to be announced soon. This weekend we are hosting the season opener of the Georgia Skydiving League as well as some additional events including a 4-way skills camp Sunday with David van Greuningen of PD Blue. There will be covered creeper area for this weekend and we will be flying Friday! Grab a couple of your friends and come out for the competition and the skills camp. Remember ... it's about fun ... whether you turn one point or 25, as long as you have a good time. That's what matters. We'll have homemade BBQ and Brunswick Stew and other good eating as well. Free beer Saturday night and a huge bonfire. Sandor & Randy (the "fire starters") will ensure that! We look forward to kicking off the season with a bang. We aren't the biggest in Georgia and that's OK. We want to be a "home" for skydivers, in the tri-state area, who want to enjoy a laid back and relaxed environment. Please check out our new website www.airsportz.com. It is Under Construction so be patient however if you have comments or suggestions ...please let us know. Stay tuned for the announcement of the RIPCORD CLUB! ( I figured we'd let your imagination run wild for a little while!) Hope to see ya this weekend! Blue Skies. Ron Green - rg@airsportz.com Wanna Skydive? - Check our www.airsportz.com! Email : iwannaskydive@airsportz.com
  17. admin

    Skydive Indiana paid to leave airport

    For about 20 years, Cathie Schlatter has been parachuting at Frankfort’s airport. She has six more days. Skydive Indiana decided to pack up its parachutes and leave the Frankfort airport at Thursday night’s Frankfort Airport Authority meeting. Dave Geyer, president of Skydive Indiana, presented the authority a contract to sell his hangar for $90,000, and the authority accepted, said Mike Reeder, president of the airport authority. Geyer has been in Frankfort for nine years and was in the fourth year of a 20-year lease with an option for five additional years. “They made us an offer to buy the building and cease operations, and we accepted,” Reeder said. Schlatter said Frankfort’s days of having sky divers are over. “Nobody wants to come here,” she said. “Frankfort’s airport has a reputation for being hostile, not just in the jumping community, but in the entire aviation community. (Geyer) was forced to close up shop. It’s sad for me because it used to be so different. Frankfort’s airport used to be a really fun place to go.” Now Schlatter and other Skydive customers will search for another landing zone, she said. “When a restaurant closes up, you go down the street and look for another one,” she sad. “For us, it’s a little harder. But lots of communities love us.” Skydive Indiana will stop jumping at the airport within the next week and will vacate the premises within 30 days, according to the resolution signed by the authority. Skydive Indiana has battled both the authority and Frankfort Flight Services, who runs the day-to-day operations of the airport, for the past two years. In April 2001, Frankfort Flight Services demanded Skydive Indiana stop allowing parachutists to land at the airport because it was dangerous to the parachutists and planes. In response, Skydive Indiana went to court. Three months later, the move landed both sides in federal court. Eventually, both sides agreed to let the jumpers return to the Frankfort airport on weekends until the FAA decided whether they are safe. Skydive Indiana also agreed to dismiss its lawsuit against the authority and the city. Last month, Geyer complained that the reduced hours hampered his business and that his jumpers suffered harassment from the airport’s management. In 1999, Skydive Indiana customers performed 6,000 jumps; in 2000, they did 5,800 and in 2001 they did 3,300, Geyer said. Even though Skydive Indiana will not be jumping at the airport, the FAA will still make a ruling, Reeder said. “(The FAA) won’t just drop this,” he said. “I don’t know when, but they will make a ruling.” The authority is not sure what it will do with the hangar, Reeder said. “We might work with the city engineer and fire chief to see if we can rent it for aircrafts,” he said. “It could act as storage, although other options are available.” Skydive Indiana and Frankfort Flight Service first clashed in July 2000, when both wanted to manage the airport. The authority was unable to decide, with former authority members Stan Smith and Bill Clinton in favor of Geyer’s group and Reeder and Gene Watchbaugh in favor of Frankfort Flight Services. The authority turned the decision over to the Frankfort City Council, and Frankfort Flight Services was awarded the contract. In the following year, both Smith and Clinton were not reappointed to the authority by Mayor Roy Scott. Geyer could not be reached this morning for comment.
  18. admin

    Taylor Air Sports closes

    Taylor Air Sports has folded it's last parachute and closed it's doors at the Fairfield County Airport. "We told them we were not going to renew their lease when it runs out next May," said Steve Goodyear, president of the Fairfield County Airport Authority. Gene Taylor, president of Taylor Air Sports, said they decided to close the doors Jan. 1. Taylor Air Sports provided parachute training for students and carried out jumps at the airport during good weather. Taylor said they were running approximately 1,000 students through the school a year and providing between 3,000 and 4,000 jumps a year. "We've been there for 14 years, and I spent the last two years there full-time trying to make it a go," Taylor said. Goodyear said one of the reasons for not renewing the lease was concern about the number of jumps being made onto the runways with the air traffic coming into the airport, especially on the weekends. Taylor said the closure and the non-renewed lease was partly political and partly because he just didn't want to bother with it anymore. Ron Houser, a member of the Taylor Air Sports Skydiving team, said he would miss it. "Taylor Air Sports has run a safe, fun and friendly operation at the Fairfield County Airport since 1988," Houser said. "Their safety record is impeccable, as any of their customers can attest to." Houser said Taylor was the life at the airport. "Taylor Air Sports actually breathed life into the Fairfield County Airport. On Saturdays and Sundays, when TAS was open for business, a majority of the cars in the parking lot belonged to TAS members or skydiving spectators. There were countless people who had no interest in the airport or flying at all who would come there to watch the skydivers," said Houser. "With the departure of TAS and Gene Taylor from the Fairfield County Airport, that facility will lose a very valuable resource of aviation knowledge and experience. These are qualities that any airport of that size would be proud and happy to have available to it." Taylor said that he was looking around and trying to find a place to base the school, but it had been a tough couple of years. "If we don't find something by the beginning of the season, sometime by April or May, we will quit," Taylor said. "It's too bad, but that's life. I quit a lucrative full-time career to pursue this, but business is tough enough without having to fight the Good Ole Boy network at the Airport Authority. It's time to move on." Goodyear said the airport was looking to use the hanger for other aircraft.
  19. admin

    Skyventure Wind Tunnel for Montreal

    14R1400. Sound like something out of a Swartzenegger movie? Its not exactly extraterrestrial, but as Simulators go, this one comes pretty close. Montreal businessman and investor, Alain Guerin, has embarked on a groundbreaking wind tunnel simulation project in Canada, involving a 1400-horsepower, energy efficient recirculing tunnel. 14R1400 is 14 ft in diameter, the first cylindrical flight chamber with four 350-horsepower fans. The foundation for Skyventures' $6 million green wind tunnel, a below-ground 100 ft long plenum installation is to begin in September, followed by erecting the 70ft tall frame. The project is set for an April 2008 completion date. 56-year-old investor, Alain Guerin owns several businesses as well as an accounting firm and lectured as a professor at the University of Quebec. Unlike most Chartered Accountants, Alain has a penchant for adrenalin-based sports. In the infancy of his skydiving career he found hitches getting through his certification which lead to revolutionary ideas. Alain says: "I needed a way to hone my skills in a safe, stress-free environment and every answer I found pointed to Skyventure." The design is like 'freefall virtual reality', offering skills honing for skydivers on all levels of experience. Unlike previous designs, the wall-to-wall airflow reduces the danger of falling off the column of air. Alain and his partner, Pierre Beaudoin have selected three locations in the greater Montreal are which will eventually be narrowed down. Skyventure Montreal will be constructed near a fully equipped shopping mall complex with movie theatres, restaurants etc. "Our mission is to provide the Quebec market with the most advanced, efficient, safe, reliable, powerful and realistic skydiving simulator in the world. More specifically, to become the most sought after, fun, exhilarating experience for the local population, the tourism industry, corporate groups and skydiving enthusiasts." adds Guerin.
  20. labyrinth

    Iran's first Skydive Centre

    Iran's first skydiving centre also open to fairer gender PAAviation recently opened the world's first Muslim skydiving school in Tehran. In accordance with Islamic regulations, a team of female instructors have also been employed to facilitate local women's' enjoyment of the thrill of skydiving. Iran has one of the youngest populations of any country in the world. (Tehran's population clocks 14 million alone) and being Iran's only skydive centre the demand will be significant. The political and historical significance of this event extends to the center's exclusive use of a brand new Britten-Norman Islander aircraft, the first western - made plane supplied to Iran since the Islamic revolution. PA Aviation provides British and European instructors with full international certification to ensure their students are trained in a safe and highly professional manner. Sky-dives are pre-booked. A private villa with pool has been allocated as accommodation for jumpers and transport will be provided. Jumps typically take place from an altitude of 10000feet with freefalls of 300kph. A professional skydive cameraman is available to shoot the jumps, upon request. The drop zone can be viewed at the following address: http://www.aii-co.com/en/azadi.asp The centre is approved by the Iranian sports federation, Iranian Civil Aviation Organisation, Iranian women's institute and the Iranian ministry of culture.
  21. Oren Peri has skydived all over the country, but the thought of floating over Long Island's scenic East End is enough to make him want to relocate here from New Paltz, he says. Peri, a carpenter as well as a professional skydiver, was one of several skydivers who testified before the Riverhead Town board Tuesday night in support of a local skydiving school's request for an extended, five-year lease within the industrial core of the former Grumman property at Calverton. Skydive Long Island, which says it is the only skydiving school in the area, needs to be named a qualified sponsor by the town to secure an extension on their one-year lease. With the long-term lease, the company will seek $700,000 in financing for business development and to buy a larger plane that can carry more skydivers. "I was limited at Spadaro," said Skydive owner Raymond Maynard, referring to the small airport in East Moriches. "Here I could grow, but there's no way I can get financing unless I have the security of a longer lease." While many supporters at the hearing welcomed the company, some safety concerns were raised. A letter was filed by Peter Wynkoop, a union representative for the National Air Traffic Control Association, who noted in an interview that "two pilots had to take evasive action" from jumpers. "Calverton is one of the busiest airways," Wynkoop said. Maynard said one incident was caused by an instructor who had difficulty speaking English and was immediately fired. "If everyone is in communication, everything can be coordinated," said Maynard. Maynard also said he believes his operation would actually decrease air traffic in the area because a skydiving symbol over Calverton will now be incorporated in the Federal Aviation Administration's aeronautical sectional chart. He says he also abides by the guidelines established by the U.S. Parachute Association, a nonprofit safety trade organization. In 15 years, the company has had one fatality with a skydiver in 1989, which Maynard said was the result of a jumper releasing himself from his parachute before landing. One of the company's planes crashed in 1991, killing the pilot and injuring three jumpers, which Maynard said was due to a faulty engine piston. A parachute association spokesman said he was not aware of any complaints received about the company. The company has been at Calverton since September, leasing two buildings for close to $30,000 a year and using the 10,000-foot runway. His company operated for 15 years out of a trailer at Spadaro, which Maynard says was an "inadequate facility" that could not handle larger planes. His two single-engine planes could only carry up to four jumpers and a pilot. The turbine engine planes he is looking to lease can carry up to 14 jumpers. If he was able to buy the larger plane, he said he could quadruple his business to 4,000 jumpers annually. He said he'd also like to eventually buy property at Calverton to build a wind tunnel so he can operate year-round. The tunnel would create a 120-mile-per-hour airflow that would lift "jumpers" straight up, giving them a free falling sensation. Town Supervisor Robert Kozakiewicz said he didn't see a "downside" to having the company at Calverton, but needs to look into safety concerns raised by some residents. Councilman Edward Densieski said he wasn't opposed to the business, but said he would like to see businesses such as aviation retroffiters and corporate charter jets lured to Calverton. Jack O'Connor of Grubb & Ellis, the property's exclusive marketer, said he recently had interest from five aviation-related companies interested in coming to Calverton. Skydive Long Island web site
  22. Skydive Sebastian, in Sebastian Florida has just stepped up it's efforts to be the number one destination for skydivers on the East Coast, and in doing so has now attracted the world's best free flyers to instruct, coach and organize on a daily basis. The Free fly Training Center (FTC) has just opened at the DZ located centrally on the east coast of Florida. "Our mission as The Free fly Training Center, is to lead the free fly scene at Skydive Sebastian in the most efficient way possible. This will allow each and every individual flyer to progress at their desired learning curve. We are doing this through extensive coaching, events every month, and free load organizing", says Mike Swanson, instructor for the school and current Free fly World Champion. The FTC has 4 instructors on staff who are already involved in organizing on a daily basis, helping to expand free flyers in aerial awareness, communication, flying skills and dive planning in a safe and controlled manner. This program aims towards flyers who are used to visiting DZ's where it's hard to find anyone to jump with, and end up spending their vacation doing solos. " We wanted to get away from the typical situation where intermediate flyers never get a chance to jump with someone who is more skilled than themselves. Our program adds to EVERYONE'S learning curve, and gives us more capable flyers to have fun with during events", reports FTC instructor Dave Brown. The FTC is the end result of all of it's members giving a combined effort in looking to start something which will benefit ALL flyers in the end. The FTC members are: Mike Swanson, from the First School of Modern Sky flying Instructor Staff, and Rook Nelson, of Free fly Chicago, which together are the current Free fly World Champions. They will be training all season long at Skydive Sebastian, hoping to defend their title in the 2003 Free fly World Championships. Addition FTC members are David Brown, also of the First School of Modern Sky flying Instructor Staff, and Rob Silver, formerly of Sebastian Free flight. Together they ensure that the quality of free flying at Skydive Sebastian will be extensive, and without a doubt, educational. Coaching programs are available for individuals who are looking to excel past their current flying ability, OR towards specific goals. All of the instructors are highly experienced and capable of teaching all facets of free fly, in a unique and efficient atmosphere. This allows the flyer to advance and become proficient in all areas of three dimensional flight. The FTC has no minimum on the number of instructional jumps that one must purchase. HOWEVER, they recommend that any student should participate in AT LEAST five instructional jumps, to attain the most out of the program. At the end of each coaching session, the instructors will evaluate the student's progress, and give advice for the future, so as to continue the process of education and guidance after the student returns to his/her respective drop zone. With the already increased interest in their programs, the FTC has worked with DZ management to get price breaks on block ticket jumps for students who come to the DZ to do at least 25 instructional jumps or more. The FTC instructor rate is discounted with this package as well, offering discounted coach rates with the purchase of 25 jumps or more. Since the beginning of October, the FTC's events calendar has started rolling with the Halloween Boogie, the Keys Boogie and an influx of regular and visiting jumpers doing coached and organized jumps. Both of the boogies were great successes, lots of high quality and safe jumping. Each month the FTC plans on having events focused on different flying and learning. The event which has drawn the biggest response from flyers thus far, is the FTC's "Pure Progression Program", where students are engaged in a 30 jump minimum course held over a period of 7 days. This takes them to the next level of human flight. The weeklong course includes seminars in three dimensional flight, canopy piloting, and camera flying. During the week, students will visit the Sky Venture Wind Tunnel in Orlando, and participate in the FTC's Wind Tunnel Program, focusing on head up flying and dimensional control. There are also two "Big Ways" camps, a Weekend Skills Camp, and The All Axis competition. The FTC hopes to draw flyers nationally and internationally not only to have fun, but also acquire as much knowledge as possible this season. If you are interested in any of these programs, or want to get in touch with FTC members contact info@freeflytrainingcenter.com or go check out the FTC's website at www.freeflytrainingcenter.com, the web site is currently being built and will be up and running soon. Also check out Skydive Sebastian's website at www.skydiveseb.com for the latest information on boogies, skills camps and coaching info and prices. All photos of Dave Brown and student Dan Labelle by Rook Nelson Written by: Erin Golden
  23. admin

    Skydive Sebastian Sold

    Skydive Sebastian has been sold and is also under new management. Come and check out the great new vibes !! We're looking forward to a busy and exciting winter season and have planned plenty of fun events for all levels of experience! See our website http://www.skydiveseb.com for a complete calendar of events. Our "New Ownership Celebration" is going to be over the "THANKSGIVING BOOGIE" 20th - 26th November!! $16 skydives, plenty of load organizing, freeflying, flat flying, wing suit flying and more! Celebrate with us! Live band, party and Turkey dinner! And......Its that time of the year again!!!! Our infamous "KEYS BOOGIE" is going to be held in Marathon from the 10th to the 12th of November!! This is always an excellent boogie and one not to be missed - Beach jumps, great party and a weekend of FUN FUN FUN skydiving over the beautiful Islands of the Florida Keys!! Contact info@skydiveseb.com ASAP to sign up or call us @ 1800 399 JUMP. See you there!! (Please note that there is a B License requirement for this event) The "HALLOWEEN BOOGIE" is next on our agenda from 27th to 29th October! Jump for $16 all weekend, free load organizing for free flyers and belly flyers! Wear a costume and party with the band "RUDY" on the night of the 28th! See you in Sebastian soon!!
  24. LONGMONT — The Mile-Hi Skydiving Center has landed in legal trouble. The business was fined $500 and ordered to pay $138 in court costs Monday after the company's attorney entered a guilty plea to a third-degree trespassing charge, a misdemeanor. The plea avoids a trial scheduled to begin today. In August, the company's president Jeffrey Sands, 37, landed his helicopter on a farm to retrieve a cut-away parachute that fell on to the property at 7457 St. Vrain Road, according to a sheriff's report. A drop zone staff member got out of the helicopter and told a woman who rents horses on adjacent property that he was retrieving the drop zone's parachute. William Jones, 70, whose wife owns the farm, called the Boulder County Sheriff's Office to file a trespassing complaint. Jones said Monday all he really wanted was a letter from the district attorney or sheriff's office telling Sands to stay off the property. "A lot of the neighbors have had problems with the skydivers," Jones said. "In the past he (Sands) has had no respect about going on to people's property." Jones said he was unsure if Sands received a letter but that "he was told if he comes on the property again, it will cost him some more money." Deputy District Attorney Ken Kupfner said he specifically requested that the misdemeanor charge name Sands' business in hopes that Sands and his employees will be more accountable for their future actions. Sands said he does his best to be sensitive to the community. To avoid problems, he said his company — operated out of Vance Brand Airport since 1995 — stopped using detachable rip cords in 1998. The company airplane flies double the 800-foot requirement and reduces the propeller's rpm when flying low to avoid noise complaints. He said the company policy is for a land crew to seek permission from property owners before retrieving items that inadvertently fall on private lands. "I want to be a good neighbor," Sands said. He called the August incident of landing a helicopter on private property "a fluke situation" because the woman the staff member got into an argument with had complained about noise before and threatened to steal and damage the next parachute she found. He also said that he thought he landed on Boulder County open space land and did not intentionally land on Jones' private property.