AggieDave

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Gear

  • Main Canopy Size
    111
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    176

Jump Profile

  • License
    D
  • Licensing Organization
    USPA
  • Number of Jumps
    3000
  • Years in Sport
    11
  • First Choice Discipline
    Swooping
  • Second Choice Discipline
    Swooping

Ratings and Rigging

  • Tandem
    Instructor
  • USPA Coach
    Yes
  • Pro Rating
    Yes

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  1. AggieDave

    Heaviest National Competitor

    At my last nationals meet I was 305 out the door. --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  2. AggieDave

    Heaviest National Competitor

    Lead with the belly! --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  3. AggieDave

    Heaviest National Competitor

    My last nationals for CP was in 2010. I was 275-280 before gear and on a Velo 111. I have exited the sport but I started competing in powerlifting after that (and still do). --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  4. AggieDave

    how do you stow your rds lanyard

    I had a spare loop sewn onto the outside of my d-bag with a small band cut in half to stow the rds line outside the bag. --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  5. AggieDave

    setting up a speed course

    When setting up a curved speed course, I did something very similar. I would take one of the long tape measures I had for the distance course and use a tent stake to place the pivot. I would then walk the arc with the known distances I needed for the inside and outside gates, marking the spot with ground spray paint. Then drill the hole in the ground for the dowel and set the blade or noodle after marking all the locations. Doing it in this manner takes setup time and cuts it by a third. That pivot location is a great place to set a camera for timing and coaching debrief. --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  6. AggieDave

    Recovery Arc Length

    In retrospect it was a silly question; I should have been able to figure it out by myself! Thanks though
  7. AggieDave

    Swooping without front risers

    Oh, so you will believe him when he says it Yup. Since Clint Clawson (jedi knight) isn't posting... --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  8. AggieDave

    Swooping without front risers

    Hey, you're the guy on the team, I'm just the guy at a computer who chowed in the same pond you swooped over once. Now, what if we backed the rotation out to a "normal" dz swooper approach... EDIT: Ok, you answered my question in your edit. Edit (2): What a pleasant discussion in Swooping. I've enjoyed it and learned something for it. There wasn't even any name calling or normal idiocy that tends to happen in the threads. Thank you. --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  9. AggieDave

    Swooping without front risers

    I'm sorry I haven't explained my thoughts well enough, I'll try to give you a better explanation. The point is that you can hold a diving turn with only harness input for a large degree turn, but you still won't achieve the same amount of speed and power potential for the canopy in the same amount of turn by using harness and riser input. By using the front risers you're able to get further out from under the canopy to produce a harder dive and more power through the recovery/roll out from your body coming back under the canopy. --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  10. AggieDave

    Swooping without front risers

    Top pilots use all the tools at their disposal to generate the right amount of speed and power from their canopy for the approach and swoop needed. Many use what I would call the "double front crunch" technique. They start by dumping from half-brakes to full flight to double fronts to start the canopy into a dive, crunching to a double front with turn using some front riser and some harness, easing out of the turn on the fronts and using the harness to control the rate of turn, to ease multiple rotations and heading control. You could also generate some speed to approach by changing your body position to a position that presents less drag, but it is better used with some harness and some riser input. That's the point. It takes total piloting control to really make a canopy perform to the level it is capable of. Anyone can super-load a canopy and get a swoop from even a straight in approach. It takes a canopy pilot to spend many jumps perfecting a single aspect of their canopy and to add it to their total control approach. --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  11. AggieDave

    Swooping without front risers

    I beg to differ. I used to do all my turns on harness only. 630s from 1000ft on a Velo at 2.7...If you are a weekend swooper that isn't worried about gates then all harness is fine. I agree that you *can* do it, just that it isn't the most beneficial way to get the most out of your turn. I would argue that someone who is just a "weekend swooper" a Velo at 2.7 with a 630 degree turn isn't appropriate at a DZ (with out being on your own swooper pass and away from any other traffic). --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  12. AggieDave

    Swooping without front risers

    I've seen the harness only approaches and even a guy who used rear risers to start his turn (no he didn't swoop very well with his "special" technique). You can swoop with it, but you won't swoop as well. Part of the power that comes from the roll out comes from having gotten out from under the canopy. Hard to do that as aggressively or well with harness only. --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  13. AggieDave

    RDS Rings: Pull them down or not?

    It is hard to tell, all 4 rings to go the bottom, but you can also see the slocks that lock the fronts down (which also holds the rears down, but I never really had a problem with those going back up). --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  14. AggieDave

    RDS Rings: Pull them down or not?

    Here's what I used to do: http://youtu.be/TKcc_7CP62Q?t=29s --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."
  15. Both? not many guys go out the door at 280 pounds. Now for more fun, I can tell you about the Velo 111 I loaded at 2.75... The point is, canopy size is a number and you can't assume that just because someone has X sized canopy that they're not doing something outside of your idea of normal with it, unless you ask them. --"When I die, may I be surrounded by scattered chrome and burning gasoline."