Douva

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  • Home DZ
    Skydive San Marcos
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    22772
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  1. Douva

    Movie: "The Mist" (possible "spoilers")

    Yes, but that was the whole source of much of the drama, with the monsters outside the store trying to kill them, and the crowd inside being divided into two camps, one of which wants to sacrifice the others to appease god... How many people in your theater cheered when Ollie shot the bible thumper? That actually got a round of applause in the theater where I viewed the movie. I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  2. Douva

    Movie: "The Mist" (possible "spoilers")

    It didn't feel right to me either. After fighting for hours to survive against all odds, to just give up and commit suicide at that time, was unbelievable. I could see it happening if they were faced again with overwhelming odds and imminent horrible death. But that wasn't the situation. They were just out of gas in the fog, with nothing immediately threatening them. If I had been in their shoes, I would have just sat and waited. Maybe the fog will lift and rescuers arrive before the monsters find us... If the filmmakers wanted to end the film the way they did, they should have set up the struggle between giving up and pushing forward as a constant theme throughout the movie. If you saw the characters struggle with that choice throughout the film, only to give up moments before they would have been rescued, the ironic ending would have fit. But for these determined survivors to simply decide, after running out of gas, that it would be best to just blow their own brains out doesn't seem to fit. HERE IS HOW THE BOOK ENDS: We got to this Howard Johnson's near Exit 3 as dusk began to close in, making driving a suicidal risk. Before that we took a chance on the bridge that spans the Saco River. It looked badly twisted out of shape, but in the mist it was impossible to tell if it was whole or not. That particular game we won. But there's tomorrow to think of, isn't there? As I write this, it's a quarter to one in the morning, July the twenty-third. The storm that seemed to signal the beginning of it all was only four days ago. Billy is sleeping in the lobby on a mattress that I dragged out for him. Amanda and Mrs. Reppler are close by. I am writing by the light of a big Delco flashlight, and outside the pink bugs are ticking and thumping off the glass. Every now and then there is a louder thud as one of the birds takes one off. The Scout has enough gas to take us maybe another ninety miles. The alternative is to try to gas up here; there is an Exxon out on the service island, and although the power is off, I believe I could siphon some up from the tank. But-- But it means being outside. If we can get gas--here or further along--we'll keep going. I have a destination in mind now, you see. It's the last thing I wanted to tell you about. I couldn't be sure. That is the thing, the damned thing. It might have been my imagination, nothing but wish fulfillment. And eve if not, it's such a long chance. How many miles? How many bridges? How many things that would love to tear up my son and eat him even as he screamed in terror and agony? The chances are so good that it was nothing but a day dream that I haven't told the others . . . at least, not yet. In the manager's apartment I found a large battery-operated multiband radio. From the back of it, a flat antenna wire led out through the window. I turned it on, switched over to BAT., fiddled with the tuning dial, with the SQUELCH knob, and still got nothing but static or dead silence. And then, at the far end of the AM band, just as I was reaching for the knob to turn it off, I thought I heard, or dreamed I heard, one single word. There was no more. I listened for an hour, but there was no more. If there was that one word, it came through some minute shift in the damping mist, an infinitesimal break that immediately closed again. One word. I've got to get some sleep . . . if I can sleep and not be haunted until daybreak by the faces of Ollie Weeks and Mrs. Carmody and Norm the bag-boy . . . and by Steff's face, half-shadowed by the wide brim of her sunhat. There is a restaurant here, a typical HoJo restaurant with a dining room and a long, horseshoe-shaped lunch counter. I am going to leave these pages on the counter and perhaps someday someone will find them and read them. One word. If I only really heard it. If only. I'm going to bed now. But first I'm going to kiss my son and whisper two words in his ear. Against the dreams that may come, you know. Two words that sound a bit alike. One of them is Hartford. The other is hope. I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  3. Douva

    Movie: "The Mist" (possible "spoilers")

    I believe the trucks were coming from the same direction as the protagonist's vehicle, meaning that the danger had probably already passed the town and the store and suggesting that the people left in the store likely survived. I finally figured out where I'd seen a similar ending before--the original Night of the Living Dead. The ending is not without merit; I just don't think it works for this film. It just seemed out of place. It didn't seem to put the cap on an existing theme, as this type of deliberately shocking ending should. The ending feels like it's trying to convey a message not echoed by the rest of the film. I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  4. Douva

    Movie: "The Mist" (possible "spoilers")

    I believe the trucks were coming from the same direction as the protagonist's vehicle, meaning that the danger had probably already passed the town and the store and suggesting that the people left in the store likely survived. I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  5. We don't know this happened she could have possibly won a spiritual coin toss if not an actual toss, I believe she was killed though. We also don't know that Anton recovered the money, only that he looked for it. When Llewelyn arrived at the hotel he didn't have the satchel with him. He only had something that looked like a gun case. This leads me to believe that the money was stashed and he intended to only tell his wife its location but he was prepared for a counter ambush but not really well enough. I assume Chigurh killed Llewelyn's wife because I don't believe he'd go back on his promise and because he checks his shoes (presumably for blood) when he walks out of her house. Do we actually see Llewelyn check into the hotel, or do we just see him walking to his room carrying the gun case? We might assume he's already checked in and is just carrying the gun with him for protection. I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  6. FYI (More Spoilers) I didn't find the ending vague; I just found it dumb. The Mexicans find Llewelyn by talking to his mother-in-law (while they're helping her with her bags). They then gun him down at the motel where he is waiting to meet his wife and mother-in-law. But they gun him down so fast (as indicated by the sound of machine gun fire and the speeding getaway vehicle witnessed by Sheriff Bell) that they don't have time to search for the money. Llewelyn's wife and mother-in-law show up just after the murder has taken place and never have a chance to meet with Llewelyn or retrieve the money. When Anton Chigurh visits the scene of the murder, that night, he knows the money is in the vent because he saw the scuff marks in the vent at the previous motel, where Llewelyn stashed the money. When Sheriff Bell returns to the scene of Llewelyn's murder, Chigurh is in the process of retrieving the money from the vent. Chigurh hides behind the door, and while Sheriff Bell is checking out the bathroom, Chirgurh escapes with the money. Sheriff Bell finds nothing in the room but the open vent. The fact that Chirgurh doesn't have the money with him when he kills Llewelyn's wife and subsequently gets hit by another car means nothing because there is no indication of the amount of time that has passed between him retrieving the money and him going to kill Llewelyn's wife. The two events might have happened days or even weeks apart. If you had a suitcase containing two million dollars, how long would you carry it around with you? As for the gas station owner and the coin toss at the beginning of the film, the "everything" Chigurh tells him he has to win is his life. It's inferred that if he'd lost, Chigurh would have killed him. It's never inferred that Chigurh has any intention of giving him any money. I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  7. I call "The Emperor Has No Clothes" on the positive reviews this film has received. (SPOILERS) The ending is intentionally vague and basically pointless. First, the filmmakers intentionally break one of the basic rules of filmmaking--the second act climax occurs off-screen--and then the entire third act opts for some sort of absurd commentary on the random, fleeting nature of life, rather than providing closure to the story. And what is the point of introducing Barry Corbin's character in the third act? So that he can talk Tommy Lee Jones's character out of giving the movie a functional ending? (HERE'S THE REAL SPOILER!) If we'd seen Josh Brolin's character die, we might have been able to accept that as some sort of closure, but for him to be portrayed as the protagonist through most of the film, only to have his death occur off-screen and the film immediately switch to the point of view of Tommy Lee Jones's character and then go NOWHERE was extremely disappointing. For fifteen minutes or so we watch Tommy Lee Jones's character, our new protagonist, and wonder how he's going to wrap up everything we've seen so far; then, after his discussion with Barry Corbin's character (a character introduced in the third act for no apparent reason other than to provide the story with a little philosophical exposition), we're treated to his breakfast table recount of the too-obviously symbolic dream he had the night before, and then the credits roll. Sorry, but I thought it was pseudo-artistic crap. Up until the death of Josh Brolin's character, the film was pretty good, but the third act sucked the big one. And if the critics weren't so afraid of questioning a film that makes such an obvious attempt to be "artistic"--particularly a film by the revered Coen brothers--they'd say so themselves. If you loved the last episode of The Sopranos, you'll love this film. Honestly, I can't even say that, because I kind of liked the last episode of The Sopranos, but I still thought this film was crap. I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  8. I'm on my old desktop computer right now. It's getting the job done while my laptop is in the shop. I didn't realize when I deleted my original post in this thread that it had already received responses--I figured nobody had seen it in time, so I just deleted it. The interview went well. It probably wasn't the most articulate interview I've ever given, since it was at least two hours earlier than I'm used to waking up, but I made good solid points. I've coordinated and given more interviews in the last week than I can count. It's been a positive experience, but I'm really glad that this week is almost over. I have two interviews scheduled for next week, but hopefully that will be it for a while (for me personally, anyway). And if you have no idea what I'm talking about, it's over in Speaker's Corner, under the thread title "My Article in the Washington Times." I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  9. I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  10. Douva

    This is some bullshit.

    They deleted my skysurfing video, as well as the stolen BASE jumping video from his page, and they claim they're looking into whether or not his entire profile should be deleted. I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  11. Douva

    This is some bullshit.

    I had to send YouTube a lengthy official statement (a lot of "I swear under penalty of perjury" type of stuff) that it was my video and that he wasn't authorized to post it. That's why they removed it. I've talked to one of the wingsuit flyers from the "Summer Fun" video. I think they feel too sorry for the guy to contribute to the destruction of his fantasy world. I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  12. Douva

    This is some bullshit.

    MySpace finally removed my skysurfing video and the BASE video from his page. I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  13. Douva

    This is some bullshit.

    I'm pretty sure the MySpace administrators are just fucking with me now. Mine is the video featuring the skysurfer who looks EXACTLY LIKE ME! I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.
  14. Douva

    This is some bullshit.

    Let's see if my new "salute" is enough to convince MySpace that I am who I say I am: http://www.lastskysurfing.com/myspace_salute I don't have an M.D. or a law degree. I have bachelor's in kicking ass and taking names.