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drjump

Security Model 150 emergency rigs

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Let's see???
GQ Security closed its factory in San Leandro, California in 1984.
GQ Defense - the parent company says (in one of their packing manuals) not to repack any of their products more than 13 (Or was it 15 years old?).

You do the math.

I could show you a few tricks about how to make replacement closing loops from Cypres cord and how to attach them to that silly, little spring, but Securities are old technology, hardly worth the effort.

The other hassle is that most of the pilot emergency parachutes built by GQ during the 1980s suffered from Service Bulletins related to acid mesh. Even if their SACs (Security Aero Conicals) were made with acid-free, MIL SPEC mesh, they have been pulled tested so many (dozens of) times that the fabric is weakened.

When I rigged for Butler Parachute Systems (1992 and 1993) we repacked plenty of Security rigs. I drizzled bromocreasol on most of them and pull-tested every single canopy. I also had to re-sew riser ends when I replaced several SACs that turned bromocreasol scary shades of yellow!!!!!
In the end, I concluded that the only reason Mr. Butler allowed Security rigs into his shop was an attempt to sell them modern PEPs made by Butler.

Note: National recently published instructions telling riggers not to repack any of their products more than twenty years old, which is just a polite way of telling people to retire anything made by National during the acid-mesh era.

Another way of looking at it is ... I tell young riggers not to waste money buyin bromocreasol because they will never pack enough round canopies - made during the acid-mesh era - to recoup their investment.

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With old rounds there's a wide range of opinions, whether to refuse to pack them all, or keep on packing even 1960's military stuff, if one just can't seem to get lucky enough to pull test the damn things to destruction.

Anyway, below is an opinion from GQ, or more specifically IrvinGQ, part of Airborne Systems. GQ doesn't categorically state that one can't pack an old Security chute.

This conveniently provides the rigger with some legal protection!

Still, despite the statement in the email, it isn't entirely clear whether the original GQ products are really considered orphaned or are somehow covered by blanket statements regarding 15(?) year lives, that are in manuals for products from a later version of the company.

Note that they are very strict with their modern gear. Even where they sell to civilians, they act like it is a military sale. (One reserve ride, throw it out!)

(Permission received from author to publish)
================================
Subject: FW: GQ Security parachutes
Date: Tue, 27 Feb 2007 13:01:56-0000
<[...]@irvingq.co.uk>

Hello Peter

Sorry for the delay. GQ Security was closed in the 1980's after it was
purchased by GQ Parachutes and shipped to the UK very little data exists
within our archive relating to products produced by them or any policies
they operated.

In the days of GQ Security and in common with many US manufacturers the
parachute life is 3 months from new and the lifing is then based on a
qualified rigger inspecting / packing it and certifying it as fit for
use. This info required to inspect / pack is normally found in the
packing manual.

At Irvin-GQ we give a in-service life based on the stressing of the
parachute and subsequently destructive testing. In which case we
recommend on average a total finite life of 10 years with repacks of 180
days. If the parachute is designed for bail out we restrict the life to
one deployment.

You may wish to contact the PIA (Parachute Industries Association
www.pia.com) as they have a riggers forum where similar questions are
asked. It may be they can offer you more exact advise based on the
Parachute you operate.
==========================


While I'm at it, here are more opinions. From an April 2004 post by "meatbomb":

========================
I phoned up GQ, as I was concerned that there are several X210Rs and X175Rs still in circulation at my DZ (13-18 years old). The response I got was that the 15 year life is a liability issue, much as most American manufacturers life their reserves at 120 days, and then it's up to the rigger...so GQ have said, after 15 years, they will no longer be liable...They then suggested that if the canopy was in good condition, it could still be packed, but that I may want to go to Paragear.com, who sell more up to date designs! Wink So it seems like, as usual, the whole thing is a fudge.
========================

That also suggests GQ doesn't prohibit old reserves from being packed.

In Mar 2006 the following was posted in the similar thread http://www.dropzone.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?post=2146742;

========================

My pdf packing instructions for EB80, Security 350, 650, 750, 850, 950, and 1050 all specify a life of 10 years for the system. For all but the 1050, the instructions say a factory inspection may result in an extension to 15 years.

There were some previous versions of the instructions that did not specify a life limit, and it is not clear to me that new packing instructions necessarily supersede the instructions that originally accompanied a TSO'd product, even though best practices would be to use the most current.

Mark
========================

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....
There were some previous versions of the instructions that did not specify a life limit, and it is not clear to me that new packing instructions necessarily supersede the instructions that originally accompanied a TSO'd product, even though best practices would be to use the most current.

Mark
========================



>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

And that gets us into a whole, scary, grey legal question.
Like I tell young Canadian riggers: American Federal Air Regulations may not be LAW in Canada, but they are considered "best practices."

Following manufacturer's instructions is LAW for every other flying machine in Canada.
Transport Canada will continue to ignore parachute rigging standards as long as we keep the fatality rate low.
"If you ever get dragged into court - and it can be proved that you ignored an American Federal Air Regulation - you stand alone."

Ignore FARs and manufacturer's instructions at your own peril.

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