riggerrob

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Posts posted by riggerrob


  1. If it is any consolation, the majority of Canadian and American skydivers believe that the current Russian invasion of Ukraine is foolish.

    You should direct your letter to the Parachute Industry Association who supply the majority of parachute fabrics and hardware. If they stop selling materials to Russian parachute factories, Russian production will soon suffer.

    Technodinamika Group will no longer be able to brag about building "stealth" parachutes.


  2. Dear dudeman17,

    ... a bit of historical background. Almost 40 years ago (1983-1984) , when Ted Strong and Bill Booth were trying to get FAA approval for their new-fangled tandem system, they copied a standard recently written for new-fangled two-seater ultra-light airplanes. By writing a standard slightly higher than any the FAA might propose, they forced the FAA to grant them a waiver for their new concept.

    That FAA waiver stood for more than 20 years until a new TSO standard (F?) was written that allowed two people to hang under the same canopy. Since the old standard for tandem instructor medicals ahd stood the test of time by minimizing fatalities, manufacturers, the FAA and USPA just continued with a standard that worked.

    As for this most recent case, USPA is respecting the individual's privacy by not revealing any more details.

    IF the TI was ingesting banned drugs, then USPA is obliged to suspend his tandem instructor rating. Privacy considerations prevent us from hearing "the rest of the story."

     


  3. Jean Charest is from my home riding of Sherbrooke, Quebec. I distrusted Charest the first time he ran for office and I still distrust him.

    He started as a lawyer = 1 point against him.

    Then he became a career politician = 2nd point against him.

    Then he switched parties = 3rd point against him.

    Then he suggested a return to Quebec's fascist attitude towards gun control = 4th point against him.

    By "Quebec fascist" gun control, I mean that Quebec was the only province against cancelling the federal long-gun registry. Then Quebec asked for all the data on Quebec gun-owners. Ottawa refused to hand over that data. Quebec's attitude towards gun-control is the exact opposite of American libertarian conservatives. While I may not agree with the NRA, I still see Charest's attitudes as un-conservative.

    Quebec gun-control attitudes are tied to the Quebec Provincial Police not wanting to be out-gunned by criminals. I left Quebec after I learned how professional the Quebec Provincial Police are ... circa age 20. 

    Bottom line: I instinctively distrust career politicians like Charest.


  4. 15 hours ago, Phil1111 said:

    I certainly see why Putin and trump got along so well. A sailor on the Russian flagship Moskova was killed when it sank. His family was informed that their son would not receive death benefits. Because it was not in Ukrainian waters when it accidentally sank.

    I'm sure trump would chuckle at that one.

     

    15 hours ago, Phil1111 said:

    I certainly see why Putin and trump got along so well. A sailor on the Russian flagship Moskova was killed when it sank. His family was informed that their son would not receive death benefits. Because it was not in Ukrainian waters when it accidentally sank.

    I'm sure trump would chuckle at that one.

    Typical bureaucrats prolonging the grief of the family of a casualty of war.


  5. Dear olofscience,

    While the Soviets/Russians were perfecting airplanes that could dog-fight at 6 to 9 Gs, the West was perfecting missiles that can turn at 30 Gs ... far more than a human can stay awake. Also consider that missiles can fly at 4 or 6 times the speed of sound ... velocities at which parts start melting off of conventional airplanes, so that modern missiles can easily triumph during tail-chases with manned airplanes that can barely exceed Mach 2.

    Also, while guided missiles were crude, inaccurate and unreliable during the Vietnam War (19?? to 1974), the USA has been steadily improving their reliability and accuracy.

    • Like 1

  6. 21 minutes ago, jakee said:

    I have no idea why we’re talking about A10s starting WW3. You’ll need to ask the other guy.

    You’ve ruined the surprise. I was planning to point out that Ukraine already has ground attack planes but has somehow avoided going mental and bombing Moscow so far. 

    One rumor has it that Ukrainians bombed a fuel depot just across the border inside Russia.

    Another version of the same story blames the flames on an industrial accident.

    It will take us YEARS to sort through all the MASKirovka.


  7. I worry about combat exhaustion amongst Ukrainian soldiers fighting on the southern and Eastern fronts. Since the start of the war, they have been fighting roughly 82 days with little rest and few replacements. They are rapidly approaching the 90 day threshold for psychological casualties.

    This 90 day threshold was noticed by Canadian Army operations Research scientists in the aftermath of the Second World War. They noticed that Canadian soldiers suffered dramatically more psychological casualties after 90 days in the front line. Since Canadian infantry regiments suffered much higher casualties than forecast, they were chronically short of replacements. For example the Black Watch Regiment of Canada suffered 350 percent casualties during less than a year of fighting in Northwestern Europe (France, Belgium, Netherlands and into Germany). Canadian infantry regiments re-rolled all their drivers, cooks, clerks, signallers, etc. as infantrymen, but still fell well short of replacement levels. Then the Canadian Army gutted non-infantry regiments to provide more infantry, but few of these replacements had the months of infantry training required to defeat battle-hardened Germans. So they just threw exhausted veterans back into the battle. At best, an infantry regiment might be told to hold their most recent conquest for a few days as the rest of the army continued the advance. But the Canadian Army was too short of manpower to give regiments significant rest periods away from the front line.  

    If treated poorly, battle exhaustion can stagnate into Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, so it is important to promptly de-brief these men and integrate them back into civilian society as soon as possible after fighting ceases.


  8. 36 minutes ago, jakee said:

    So why did you bring it up?

    Specifically, why A10s were left out. Not why nukes were left out, why A10s were left out which is your scenario that you chose to talk about. So if you’re not worried about anyone with access to A10s doing something stupid why are you worried about someone with access to A10s doing something stupid?

    Why are you guys wasting time babbling about an American ex-president and A-10s?

    The USAF is the only air force to fly A-10s and they have repeatedly tried to retire them.

    Meanwhile, the Ukrainian Air Force started this most recent war with about 60 Sukhoi 25 Grach (NATO reporting name Frogfoot) ground attack airplanes. SU-25 is a dedicated, armored, sub-sonic, ground attack airplane roughly comparable to A-10. Both the Russian and Ukrainian air forces have used thier SU-25s to bomb and rocket ground targets. Both suffered Su-25 losses over Ukraine. 

    On 5/13/2022 at 7:37 AM, kallend said:

    At the risk of triggering a Godwin, isn't all this rather reminiscent of a certain German dictator in the 1930s and 1940s?  

     


  9. 2 hours ago, olofscience said:

    NATO gains the entire Baltic sea, which is a big gain.

    If Russia attacks a non-NATO Finland, the Russian army will be destroyed. That much is already clear from their performance against Ukraine.

    Yes it might add a trigger point.

    No it won't give Russia additional political leverage. Their complaint that NATO caused their invasion of Ukraine was like a rapist blaming their victim that they were "forced" to do it.

    Finland bloodied the Russian bear's nose back in 1939 and they will bloody it again if Russia is foolish enough to invade again in the near future.

    Also remember that Finland has a first class electronics industry and power tools industries.


  10. On 5/16/2022 at 3:57 PM, dudeman17 said:

    Curious what percentage of PEP's these days use squares, and if there is any suggestion/requirement that the pilot has jump experience?

    I have written a 2,000 word article to answer your question. I am just waiting until KITPLANES Magazine publishes my article entitled "Where can you stuff a parachute?" The first article is aimed at helping kitplane, aerobatic and glider pilots chose the PEP container (back, long back or seat) that best fits their cockpit..

    Then I will subject my article entitled "Round or Square Parachute?"

    My article will be controversial because it questions ancient dogma about pilot emergency parachutes (PEPs). Much of that dogma was cast in concrete back when I was young and beautiful (1970s) but since then I have seen civilian skydiving schools transition from all-rounds to all squares. I have worked with a wide variety of student gear while dispatching S/L and IAD students. I am also an accompanied freefall instructor and tandem instructor examiner. So my second article may sound like a series of "no shit, there I was ... " stories, but it details how my attitudes have changed over the last 40 years. I am also a rigger and have packed squares into PEPs made by Butler (custom-built Beta back, long back and seat containers), Para-Phernalia (Softie back), Rigging Innovations (Aviator back) and Ron Dionne (back). I even did a half dozen live jumps on Aviator prototypes. I concluded that large docile (280 square feet) Precision P124A canopies are boring and much less likely to injure a pilot in distress than an old-school round parachute (e.g. Strong 26 foot conical).

    I just learned that Para-Tec in Germany will also sell you a "Wingman" back PEP containing a large square reserve.

    In short, Ed Scott trains new jump-pilots at "Jumpers Away" and he recommends square pilot emergency parachutes for jump pilots: specifically Rigging Innovations' P124A/Aviator series. Mr. Scott includes a few hours of ground school about squares packed into PEPs, and an optional tandem jump to give the new pilot some experience at steering a square.

    • Like 1

  11. On 3/3/2022 at 4:44 PM, JerryBaumchen said:

    Hi dudeman,

    I'm not sure what you mean by 'had the line stow pouch on the side.'

    The line stow pouches are/have always been on the bottom face of the free bag.

    ParaFlite developed a canopy called the StratoFlyer.  After ownership of a fews months, they sent owners a survey about their experience with jumping the StratoFlyer.  From this survey, ParaFlite determined that a number/most of the malfunctions had to do with line stowage.  So, ParaFlite developed the line stowage pouch * to minimize/prevent problems with line deployment.

    Jerry Baumchen

    * Maybe better described as line non-stowage pouch.

     

    Yes, line stowage pouches have always been on the bottom/back side of D-bags. By that we mean that the line stow pouch/pocket lays against the pack tray, towards the back-pad.

    Other line stow configurations are limited to pilot emergency parachutes (EP). When we were developing the P124A/Aviator pilot emergency parachute, the long (20 inches or 30 cm) deployment bags were awkward to stand on end to stow lines, and I got tired of remembering which direction I had rolled the D-bag, so I suggested installing the pouch on the top or outer face of the D-bag. That became the production standard on Aviators. More recently, Para-Phernalia announced that riggers have the option of packing with the line-stow pouch on top or bottom.

    Para-Tec's (Germany) "Wingman" series of PEPs are also designed around square canopies, but their D-bags have line stow pouches sewn to the backside or bottom side of the D-bag.


  12. 22 hours ago, The Hundredth Monkey said:

    it means nothing to you, because you are so focused on character assassination, that you forgot to even google the term.

    It refers to a specific experiment that discovered an innate telepathic trait in mammals.

    But you are probably an nihilistic atheist that replaces the spiritual void with a god complex.

    Try actually knowing what you are talking about next..





     

    Where is the "MASKirovka" emoji when you need it?


  13. We need to distinguish between Russians who fled the USSR a long time ago, versus those who still live in Russia and support Mr. Poutine.

    I have taught and rigged for several Russians who immigrated to Canada 20 or 30 years ago. They are the wiser group.


  14. 9 hours ago, kallend said:

    At the risk of triggering a Godwin, isn't all this rather reminiscent of a certain German dictator in the 1930s and 1940s?  

    Dear Mr. Hundredth Monkey,

    Please limit your comments to sex crimes committed within Ukraine and during 2022. Most online forums ban discussion of pedophilia.


  15. 6 hours ago, ryoder said:

    I had no idea the "jack-in-the-box effect" was this spectacular:

     

    Ammunition fires release spectacular amounts of energy.

    Similar video shows Russian T-72s, etc. being destroyed the same way in Chechnya, back during the 1990s. Chechyn rebels waited until Russian tanks entered the city of Grozny, then rebels dropped Molotov cocktails down their hatches.

    Trivia, the "Molotov cocktail" weapon was named after the Soviet Minister for Foreign Affairs: Vyacheslav Molotov during the 1930s and 1940s. They were first used to destroy Soviet supplied tanks during the Spanish Civil War (1936). 


  16. To the OP: stop questioning local procedures and just go with the local program. You do not know hat you do not know. That first jump is a huge sensory over-load that you will only understand after you have been through it.

    I have worked as a pilot, rigger, TI, S/L jump-master, IAD instructor, accompanied freefall instructor, etc. at a variety of DZs running a variety of student progression programs.

    I am glad that most DZs now insist on a tandem first. Tandem speeds up ground school while reducing uncertainty and the numbers of students wandering off to land in the forest. Even if it only means that I have to extract a single student from a tree, that is enough.

    Tandem gets the student past that HUGE sensory overload.

    Tandems number 2 and number 3 teach the basics of altitude awareness, stable body position and opening the main parachute at a reasonable altitude.

    After 3 tandems, the training value of tandems diminishes dramatically.

    The ideal training program starts with a tandem or three followed by a few minutes in a wind tunnel, then 3 to 5 S/L or IAD jumps. Once the student has demonstrated that he/she can steer a parachute to a safe landing, we take them up with freefall instructors to teach the basics of accompanied freefall. After they achieve SOLO status, students need another dozen-ish jumps with coaches to complete their packing, spotting, etc. skills needed for an A License. an steer him/herself to a safe landing field, then we start teaching freefall skills. 

    Do not try to rush the learning process. too much rushing will create errors and require you to repeat a level.


  17. 18 hours ago, JoeWeber said:

    Actually, the best Russian tank at the moment, until the Burlak is developed, is the T-14 Armata. It truly is a jewel of a main battle tank with many advantages including an unmanned turret, a protective armored compartment for the crew, advanced targeting, a superior explosive armor defense system, a 1500HP engine etc. They've been showing it off at parades since 2015 and planned serious production starting 2018. But at USD $4 million a copy there was, apparently, too much money to be skimmed so only some (20-40?) have been built. Had they actually built several hundred that could have been deployed early things might have turned out very differently. Spasiba, Russian Oligarchs.

    Have any T-18 Armata tanks been seen fighting in Ukraine?


  18. We will never drill for the last barrel of oil because it will be too deep, too far offshore and too crude.

    By then synthetic gasoline will be less expensive. Less expensive is relative because only wealthy antique automobile owners (think Clive Cussler and Jay Leno) will be able to afford to drive their cars.


  19. On 5/5/2022 at 12:47 AM, metalslug said:

    Well let's not be sanctimonious about this. Short of helium balloons; everyone here who skydives depends on fossil fuels to do it. Next time you buy that completely necessary jump ticket, give a nod to the oil producers.

    Not to worry. In a few more years, oil - and jump tickets - will become so prohibitively expensive that only the rich will be able to afford to skydive.

    Everyone else will turn to BASE jumping.