Okanagan_Jumper

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Gear

  • Main Canopy Size
    150
  • Main Canopy Other
    Pilot 132
  • Reserve Canopy Size
    143
  • Reserve Canopy Other
    Smart 135 LPV
  • AAD
    Cypres 2

Jump Profile

  • Home DZ
    Okanagan Skydive
  • License
    C
  • License Number
    6911
  • Licensing Organization
    USPA
  • Number of Jumps
    870
  • Tunnel Hours
    4
  • Years in Sport
    2
  • First Choice Discipline
    Wing Suit Flying
  • First Choice Discipline Jump Total
    515
  • Second Choice Discipline
    Freeflying
  • Second Choice Discipline Jump Total
    100

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  • IAD
    Coach
  1. Okanagan_Jumper

    The WingNut...an Airspeed Indicator for wingsuit pilots

    Hello. I managed to do 3 flights with my WingNut system in January at Skydive Perris. I was satisfied with the performance and have continued with development. My first flight I set a target airspeed of 95 knots and that was much too slow for the distance round of WOWS. The second run was with 110 knots and that was much better performance. The LED system in use then was accpetable but not ideal as it did not indicate absolute speed but rather indicated a speed above or below the target speed entered prior to exit. The latest development has focused on designing an Android app for use with the Moverio BT-300 augmented reality (AR) glasses. I have a rudimentary app programmed now that indicates speed both in a digital readout and on an analog style airspeed indicator. A 5 minute video [url=https://youtu.be/nlLZoD7mAOc]here[/url]. Skip to 3:45 mark for the app in operation. Cheers John
  2. Okanagan_Jumper

    Do Canopies Naturally Turn Upwind?

    Don't need to break out the flight computer because it's going to tell us about path over ground, which I think we aren't talking about. We are interested in the aircraft's response in the air. Just landed here in Edmonton. On approach we had a moderate headwind from about 45 degrees from the side. If that headwind had suddenly increased and was still from the same direction, what wouldn't have happened is that the aircraft would turn more into that headwind. We would need to manually adjust the heading to compensate for the increased drift in order to stay on the final approach course. Not sure if that helps. John
  3. Okanagan_Jumper

    Do Canopies Naturally Turn Upwind?

    I believe we that we all agree that a steady wind won't result in a heading change of a descending parachute. The theory is now that a wind from let's say the front right side that increases in strength will result in a turn of the canopy to the right. May ask what would happen with a wind from the front right that is decreasing in intensity?
  4. Okanagan_Jumper

    Do Canopies Naturally Turn Upwind?

    We'll I ain't ever seen an airplane turn into an increasing wind from the side. That's only in the first 19000 hours of flying time though. Still time for it to happen I suppose. :) Take care
  5. Okanagan_Jumper

    Do Canopies Naturally Turn Upwind?

    Bill, the weathercocking only occurs on the ground. There is no weathercocking in the air. As soon as the aircraft lifts off it no longer has a clue where the wind is coming from and hence won't turn into the wind. All it cares about is airspeed and angle of attack.
  6. Okanagan_Jumper

    Do Canopies Naturally Turn Upwind?

    On the takeoff role, the goal is to keep the aircraft tracking straight down the runway and the wings level, which meams using aileron into the wind and rudder to keep the nose straight. Depending on the strength of the wind, it can feel quite awkward as the wheels skip and hop a bit. The controls in this case are basically crossed, with the ailerons turning left and the right rudder pedal being used to oopose the aircraft's tendency to turn to the left as a result of weathercocking. As the aircraft lifts off, the pilot quickly and smoothly returns the aircraft to coordinated flight. This may mean the pilot will turn the heading of the aircraft towards the wind direction, thereby trying to track the aircraft straight over the ground in line with the direction of the runway, but many departure procedures specifiy maintaining runway "heading", so the aircraft longitudinal axis will remain lined up with the runway, and the aircraft will simply drift with the wind. It should be noted that the weathercocking only happens as a result of an unbalanced force that occurs while the aircraft is attached to the ground. Similar to the effect of a boat on a water. Once the aircraft lifts into the air, there is no longer an unbalanced force, and no longer any weathercocking. (And no tendency to turn into wind or out of wind.)
  7. Okanagan_Jumper

    Do Canopies Naturally Turn Upwind?

    And that is based upon what.... Well, for one thing a boat is floating on water. It's, not moving through the air. When I did my BASE course in May with SRBA, I realized immediately that Tom Aiello understood airflow and canopies as good as a pilot. Perhaps he could explain this stuff better than I could. I'm in the simulator in March or April. If we have time, I'll get the instructor to program in a very rapid shearing wind from the side and fly hands off with no autopilot and film the results. Cheers
  8. Okanagan_Jumper

    Do Canopies Naturally Turn Upwind?

    This might be true for boats but not for planes or parachutes I'm afraid. Maybe use a submerged submarine as your sample and see if your theory still holds.
  9. Okanagan_Jumper

    Do Canopies Naturally Turn Upwind?

    kallend, the relative airflow (relative wind is the less preferred term) is defined as being equal and opposite to the flight path of the aircraft (parachute), so unless the aircraft is moving sideways through the air (not over the ground), there can't be a relative airflow from the side. That would imply that an aircraft could fly with a wing pointed forward and the nose to the side. That would more than likely mean the aircraft was in one heck of a stalled condition.
  10. Okanagan_Jumper

    Do Canopies Naturally Turn Upwind?

    With all due respect, no. We practice microburst encountering procedures almost everyone we are in the simulator (every 6 months). In the aircraft I'm currently typed on, the Boeing 737NG, it calls out "WINDSHEAR!" repeatedly when encountering either a rapidly increasing headwind or a rapidly increasing tailwind. In the situation you describe, a rapidly increasing tailwind, the immediate reaction of the aircraft is a loss of indicated airspeed as noted in the airspeed indicator, a concomitant loss of true airspeed, and the resulting loss of lift , and therefore a loss of aircraft performance (speed altitude) up to and including an aerodynamic stall. We don't ever train to expect a turn "downwind" because it doesn't happen. Most aircraft, and to a lesser degree, most ram air parachutes, are designed to be inherently stable. For aircraft its pitch stability means it will generally try to return to original speed. Roll stability generally means the aircraft will initially maintain the roll attitude it was left in and gradually end up into an increasing spiral dive (descending turn of increasing speed and bank angle ) until it eventually exceeds design speed and loading leading to structural damage. In a decreasing performance wind shear event, after the nose drops in response to its loss of airspeed and pitch stability, left alone, it would return to its trimmed pitch attitude and airspeed. I used to fly sailplanes. In heavy convective activity, one wing would occasionally encounter a strong thermal (column of rising air) and thus would result in an imbalance of lift between the left and right wing. The pilot would then have to return the wings to level flight, but there was no tendency for a sailplane to turn "downwind". I'm just on my way to fly to Honolulu. If we encounter any jet streams in descent I'll try to get some photos. Cheers John
  11. Okanagan_Jumper

    Do Canopies Naturally Turn Upwind?

    Well, in the jet I fly, the wing will move up or down or yaw slightly in response to air flow changes due to turbulence and shearing effects of changing wind velocity. How much a wing or parachute reacts to this airflow change is a question of stability, and for a ram air parachute this is complicated by inflation. But I think you can give up any notion of defending the idea that wings, inflatable or not, turn downwind as a matter of course. If there is a built in turn well that's a different topic. P.S, I've flown in 150 knot tailwinds up at altitude and the aircraft shows no desire to turn around.
  12. Okanagan_Jumper

    Do Canopies Naturally Turn Upwind?

    Oh gosh it's hard to read posts implying headwind or tailwind or crosswind affect flight characteristics of an airfoil in flight. As others have stated, a wing in flight doesn't care what it is doing over the ground, it only cares about it's airspeed. A change in the wind's velocity results in a momentary change in the wing's performance until equilibrium returns.
  13. Okanagan_Jumper

    The WingNut...an Airspeed Indicator for wingsuit pilots

    Hello fellow wingsuit pilots. The Second WOWS Championship is this weekend at Skydive Perris. I have mostly completed the WingNut to a stage where I can use it in a race setting. I am not sure exactly what IAS I will use as a target during the distance rounds, but I am hoping to get a few practice jumps in tomorrow afternoon and Friday before the distance competition on Saturday. I'm not a skilled wingsuiter and WingNut isn't going to magically transform me into one. However, I am hoping it will prompt my best performance in the distance round. I might as well sit out the speed comp . Here is the latest poorly shot videohttps://youtu.be/NTHAwBbuy0U showing the airspeed guidance function in operation as I blow into the pitot tube. And a blog about WingNut by a techy writer: https://blog.adafruit.com/2018/01/10/why-this-guy-needs-a-helmet-full-of-tech/ Go Canada! Go John! Go WingNut! John Swallow Major WingNut "Design, Marketing, Testing...I do it all!" WingNut Industries Alliston, Ontario, Canada
  14. Okanagan_Jumper

    The WingNut...an Airspeed Indicator for wingsuit pilots

    More progress to report. I have the prototype successfully capable of entering the target airspeed on the helmet unit alone, without the need for connection to a PC. Previously I had to enter the speed on a PC and then load the firmware into the device. Now I can simply enter the target IAS with the aid of a couple of buttons and an LCD, and that becomes my target speed. The Flight Guidance/Flight Director function is mostly complete. I have the left and right vertical LED strips (15 individual LEDs each) on the visor indicating the pitch direction up or down to achieve the target IAS. The system will likely change several times before a final production version is in place, but one has to start somewhere. The flight testing program will involve successive flights at varying IAS. I hope to plot a CL/CD curve fairly quickly with the results. A line drawn tangential to the curve from the origin should give me my (zero wind) best L/D speed. (Subject to the usual caveat that it's not a rigid wing...) I secured the use of a grommet tool and for the C-RACE I installed two small grommets just inside of the gripper, and with the air of two nylon tie wraps, I secured the pitot tube assembly to the gripper. Lateral guidance capability towards a magnetic track or a magnetic heading is on the radar. I just need to squeeze a little bit more out of my code to free up some memory. That or leave the Arduino behind sooner than planned and graduate to a Teensy board. If flight testing phase goes as planned, I should soon have an electrical engineer and PCB designer working on getting something more robust for further testing. That's all for now. Short video showing the target IAS entry procedure here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZuH4KAaRD8 Cheers, John Major WingNut Grand Poobah
  15. Okanagan_Jumper

    The WingNut...an Airspeed Indicator for wingsuit pilots

    Hello. Since entering my first wingsuit competition this past summer, the Wide Open Wingsuit Series (WOWS: www.wingsuitrace.org), I realized that, in addition to an obvious need for coaching, I also needed an airspeed indicator (ASI). I'm a sucker for instrumentation, but also I recognized that if I wanted to achieve the most performance out of my flying, I needed an ASI. I've read the various articles coming out the last few years from people like Matt G., (and the other manufacturers/experienced wingsuiters and the info on TopGunBASE, and I fully understood their focus on angle of attack. When I started wingsuiting a few years ago, I too though that staying aloft for as long as possible was the name of the game. But that was wrong. Most especially for wingsuiters in the BASE arena, low angle of attack (high speed) is where the safety lies. As a former glider pilot and light aircraft instructor, I know that over-reliance on instruments is a bad thing. We actually start flight training with concentration on the aircraft attitude: the relationship between the nose of the aircraft, and the horizon. Eventually, when mastery of that concept has been achieved, we introduce an instrument scan. After the final 2017 qualifying round of the WOWS competition this past August, I left Kapowsin with a desire to design an airspeed indicator. I had read the posts YuriBASE had made over the years, and appreciated thingshis efforts (the AofA vane, among others). Matt G brings up AofA often in his thoughts about wingsuit performance. It may or may not be known widely in the wingsuit community, but IAS is a good proxy for AofA. There is one unique indicated airspeed for every AoFA, for a given weight. For instance, in unaccelerated flight, an aircraft will stall at the same IAS (and AofA) for a given weight. Every time. In the WOWS competitions, I had no chance at the speed round. I simply do not have the training to compete at a high level. In PPC comps, which I have not done, it is a given that I could not be competitive: I simply do not have the ability of sustained high speed/high angle flying necessary to increase kinetic energy prior to entering the competition window. In the WOWS distance competition however, I made the final round once and the semi final once. This I attribute to a lack of understanding on the speed necessary to fly for max distance. PPC comps rely to a large degree on flying steep then efficiently rounding out upon/prior to entering the window. WOWS has no such prologue: the signal is given, then everyone must go immediately to that IAS that will give the desired maximum performance. But how determine that performance? I suppose if we always flew in zero wind aloft conditions, we could, to a degree, use a GPS like FlySight. Which all brings me to the WingNut. After 14 weeks of solid work, I finally took to the skies yesterday in a prototype airspeed indicator. It is a work in progress. I did two jumps yesterday, and the first one proved that a helmet mounted pitot tube was a bad choice. That was almost a given. The second jump however, brought encouraging results. For that jump, I used a pitot tube mounted inside a turkey baster chassis, that I placed inside the space where the gripper goes on my left wing, this on my Freak 2. The Freak 2's gripper is very nearly aligned with the longitudinal axis of the jumper, allowing as accurate a meaure of stagnation (total) pressure as possible. The total and static pressures were routed via tubes to the differential air pressure sensor inside the body of the turkey baster, and then that electrical signal was routed via wires in the arm wing to the helmet mounted processing MCU. The means of displaying airspeed is yet to be finalized. I have a few options. Stand by for further. I believe what I have designed is very similar to what was suggested somewhere in this forum in the last year or two. It is not revolutionary, but at least for me, it provides, or will provide, what I need: a means to improve my performance in the coming WOWS competitions. I see no reason why the same device would not also be helpful for those competing in PPC style competitions. So far I have the WingNut recording airspeed and other data at a rate of once per second, based on the time signal from the GPS unit. This allows marriage of the data from WingNut to that of FlySight, allowing a true portrait of aerodynamic performance. Some have asked if WingNut is necessary, given all the data FlySight supplies. I think yes. My day time job (and sometimes night-time) is that of a commercial airline pilot. We make use extensively of GPS for enroute navigation and for stand alone RNP and GPS overlay approaches. But to keep the aircraft flying at its highest and most economical and efficient performance, we need IAS. We certainly have TAS at our grasp, but when Air Traffic Control asks us what our speed in descent (or the climb) is, we most always reply with "xxx knots indicated". Anyhow, lots of words. I'm just happy that I have a valid proof of concept, and will work even harder now to work out the kinks. I'd like to throw down the challenge to anyone else who has an interest in such pursuits to see what they can come up with. It's not rocket science, although I'd appreciate the assistance of any rocket scientists out there. The following data is the IAS readings taken at 1 second intervals during my 2 minute 20 second flight overhead Eloy yesterday. I wasn't consciously trying to maintain any speed or attitude. I was trying to incorporate the advice Matt G gave me prior to the first WOWS competition back in May in Georgia. There was stuff about legs and torso and, well, stuff. In any case, the data seems to me, to accelerate and decelrate faily smoothely, with no completely wacky outliers. Wish me luck in moving forward. Who knows, maybe the product reaches fine skydiving retail providers in the future. Or not. Cheers, John Swallow Head WingNut and Lead Program Designer The WingNut Company Alliston, Ontario, Canada [Two 5 Zero] Two Zero 8 - Seven Four 6 Two pilotjohnjohn@gmail.com WingNut test flight #2. Dec 15/2017 Eloy, AZ. Freak2 wingsuit. WingTip mounted pitot tube. Knots Indicated Airspeed (KIAS): 74 74 73 72 74 73 74 75 78 81 83 84 84, 85 85 85 86 87 87 88 90 90, 89 89 90 91 92 92 93 94 95 96 97 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 100 100 100 99 99 99 100 98 98 96 98 98 98 99 97 97 97 98 98 98 99 98 97 96 94 94 92 92 92 91 90 89 90 90 90 91 92 92 95 96 96 96 96 94 92 92 91 89 89 89 91 92 92 92 91 90 90 90 92 92 92 92 91 89 89 89 88 89 86 86 86 86 86 86 86 86 86 84 84 84 83 85 85 87 87 86 85 85 85 85 84 84 81 78 78 74 73 72 72 74 75 73 73 70 63