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Loren

2nd jump, 2nd malfunction

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Hello all,
New to the site and the forums.

I am a new student to the sport. I have done several (8) tandems over the years, but just started working on my A license. This last weekend, I began my static line progression. I got 2 jumps in, and experienced malfunctions on both jumps, both were self induced. My school does static line @ 5k ft agl.

On my first jump, I had a horrible exit, I pulled a "dead spider." I flipped about 3 times before the static line pulled, and deployed upside down. This resulted in a nasty twist, which I cleared without issue. (My FJC teacher was very thorough in EP training) After exiting the plane, the winds increased dramatically (welcome to colorado) and I landed without incident in 20 mph crosswinds.

On my second jump, I made sure to focus on my exit, but still flopped it. I exited and went head down and slightly sideways, but popped a perfect arch. This made me twist sideways due to relative wind. My instructors told me that my malfunction this time was basically a horseshoe. My right rear riser wrapped around my left ankle upon static deployment. I cleared the ankle twist, looked up, saw the deflated chute, and after trying to clear the malfunction, cut away and popped my reserve. I was at 3700 ft upon cutaway, so still had time.

I never once felt a sense of panic, but simply executed my EPs and rode my reserve down to safety. My girlfriend (who is also on the static line progression) made both of her jumps without incident. I have full faith in my instructors and riggers, and realize that both of my malfunctions were entirely self-induced.

I am simply wondering this:
Has anyone here ever heard of a student jumper experiencing malfunctions on both of their first 2 jumps?
(especially one being a horseshoe)

I am not deterred in my progress, in fact, I am going for my 3rd and 4th jumps this weekend (though this time exiting from hanging on the strut, rather than leaping from the door, per my instructor)

Safe diving to all.

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Good job.

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Has anyone here ever heard of a student jumper experiencing malfunctions on both of their first 2 jumps?
(especially one being a horseshoe)



Technically, the one on your first jump wasn't a malfunction. I've witnessed a horse shoe on a first time S/L jumper from the ground. Canopy stayed in the bag, I can't really recall if the jumper was entangled with the lines or the bridle, or both. She did her EPs and landed safe. I think she might have quit jumping now, but she continued to jump, got her licence and jumped for a few years.

What type of plane are you jumping from?

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Jumping from a C206.

And thanks for the clarification that the first wasn't a malfunction. I'm still learning and picking up the terminology. I just knew that my lines were twisted and that I had to pull apart on my risers and kick in the opposite direction to gain canopy control.

I must say, my 2nd jump malfunction caused a lot of stress to the folks on the ground. But the thorough training I received made me feel like it was nothing I couldn't overcome while I dealt with it.

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I cleared the ankle twist, looked up, saw the deflated chute, and after trying to clear the malfunction, cut away and popped my reserve.

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I curious as to how you tried to 'clear the malfunction', and is that what you were taught?











~ If you choke a Smurf, what color does it turn? ~

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Yes, one wonders about the nature of the mal and how clear it was to the student, whether it was major (eg, lineover induced by asymmetric opening) or more minor (eg, closed end cells, popped toggle) -- fixable by pumping the toggles.

@Loren: Limbs caught in the risers or lines happens occasionally with bad body position on a static line jump, such as if one rotates backwards so that the feet up are pointing up at the sky during opening. Bad exits are common, getting snagged is uncommon but happens. Depending on the aircraft, you'll probably need to work on stepping off the aircraft evenly without pushing off too much with the hands.

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