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safety : Gear and Equipment : Is It Time For A Reline: Here's How to Know

Is It Time For A Reline: Here's How to Know

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Do your suspension lines have a noticeable five-o'clock shadow? Maybe itís time for your gear to spend the weekend with your friendly neighborhood rigger. If youíre unsure, youíre not alone--plenty of skydivers hem and haw about this particularly important aspect of canopy maintenance.

Looking for a little more convincing? Hereís a brief education on line maintenance by Karen Saunders, one of the few (and one of only two women) to hold the lofty Advanced Rigger ticket from the British Parachute Association. Karen has seen enough fuzzy line sets to give any sane canopy pilot the night sweats, and she wants to make sure itís not you that gets to live the nightmare of a mid-swoop snap.

1. Go with your gut.

ďTrust your instincts. If you think that maybe your lines are looking a bit shabby, they probably are. Most people will look at their line set and say, That looks a bit shit, but Iíll do something about it tomorrow. Tomorrow turns into a week, and then a month. Before you know it, youíll have a line snap or an off-heading opening. Fix it before you create yourself some problems.Ē

2. Know what youíve got.

ďThe most important thing is to know what type of line is on your parachute. Most people donít--and if they donít, then they wonít know how many jumps they can expect to get out of that line set before it needs to be replaced. And they also wonít know whether to expect to have line shrinkage or whether it is going to go the other way and simply snap when it reaches the end of its life cycle. Vectron and HMA will do just that if you donít take care of them: Snap. They wonít give you a warning aside from the fact that they will start to fray as they age.

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The other thing to think about is where your line set actually comes from. Most people will buy their line sets from manufacturers, but there are riggers out there that will make cheaper line sets themselves. I can spot a manufactured line set from anything else in a flash, but most people couldnít--and maybe thatís the line set have got on your canopy that you bought from somebody in good faith. It is always best before you buy anything to get it checked out.Ē

3. Get some visual reference.

ďOnce you know what line type is on your parachute, look at Performance Designsí line wear charts for your lines to get an idea of what wear actually looks like. It may surprise you. Using that reference as an example, you can see how deterioration looks over a given period of time and what percentage of strength you lose.

You can test your new knowledge immediately by looking at the bottom part of your brake lines and the stabilizers. Those lines are always going to take the brunt of the wear. Generally, having the bottom part of your brake lines replaced at the first sign of wear is going to save you a whole world of problems.Ē

4. Watch for the warnings (if you have a line type that broadcasts them).

ďIf your lines are made of Spectra or Dacron and you need a reline, you can expect to get some bad openings: an off-heading or big surges after opening. Thatís generally because the slider is moving up and down your lines, heating them up and shrinking them.

If your parachute opens and it is not on-heading, then it is generally an indication that it is going out of trim. You need to get somebody to look at that. When you do, they might look at it and tell you that the lines are okay; maybe itís just your body position causing the problem. If they look at your lines and go holy shit, man, you need to replace straight away, then you have your answer. Either way, youíll have peace of mind.Ē

5. Donít get tunnel vision.

ďDonít just look at your lines. Your lines are suspended by some binding tape which needs checking as well. Especially after a hard opening, be sure to look at the tape where each line is attached to your canopy, as well as the fabric around it.

Kill lines are another thing. Everybody forgets that a kill line wears out in the same way as a suspension line, except a lot more quickly. If your kill line is made out of Spectra and has shortened, then youíre going to start having problems with your openings. The dead giveaway is finding that your pilot chute is turned virtually inside out every time you land.

A kill line wears throughout the bridle. The weakest point doesnít have to be at the bottom or top--it can snap right in the middle--so make sure you pull it through from both ends when you check it. Pull it as far as you can from one end and then pull it as far as you can from the other end to have a good look.

Finally: If youíre getting a new line set, please, please, please replace your slinks as well. Donít put a new line set on it and put an old set of slinks on it. That defeats the object of this exercise. They are not infallible. They do fail, and the last thing you want is for a slink to fail at 200 feet, because youíre not going to survive that.Ē

6. Remember: The integrity of your lineset isnít a good place to save a few bucks.

ďThe costs to reline arenít as bad as you might think. I can tell you roughly what I charge, but I canít speak for other riggers. That said, I will always look at something for free, and if someone asks me for it, I will always give my advice for free, and thatís also the way most of the riggers I know like to work.

I charge 15 pounds, which equates to about 20 U.S. dollars, to replace both lower brake lines. If the lowers go from the cascade all the way to the toggle, I charge 40 pounds--which is something like $60. If you compare that amount of money to losing a brake line when youíre flaring--or when you are at 100 feet--you see the value. You have to weigh the cost of your own safety.

If you donít happen to have a rigger on your dropzone, then go to an experienced jumper. See them and say, Hey, Iím a bit worried about this. What do you think I should do? If they look at it and start laughing, you have your answer.Ē

About Annette O'Neil:

Annette O'Neil is a copywriter, travel journalist and commercial producer who sometimes pretends to live in Salt Lake City. When she's not messing around with her prodigious nylon collection, she's hurtling through the canyons on her Ninja, flopping around on a yoga mat or baking vegan cupcakes.




By Annette O'Neil on 2018-01-11 | Last Modified on 2018-01-19

Rating: 12345   Go Login to rate this article.  | Votes: 6 | Comments: 2 | Views: 2927

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2 Comments

JohnMitchell
JohnMitchell  2018-01-16
5 out of 5 stars

Good advice on an often overlooked subject.


lukerobi
lukerobi  2018-02-12

I didn't get the "holy shit, replace those right away!!", just a gentle "your lines are 6-8 inches out of trim, I suggest you do a re-line in the very very near future"

Something tells me it means the same thing.... especially since it was during a line twist reserve repack :/


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