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safety : Freefall Photography : Understanding Camera Switches

Understanding Camera Switches

Introduction

Taking photos while skydiving is easier today than it has ever been, yet doing the job properly remains serious business. Camera technology marches ceaselessly forwards, and while the gap between the products aimed at the casual consumer and the lofty professional is narrowing - any freefall photographer that considers themselves proper job will very likely rock a stand-alone stills camera as part of their setup.

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Try as you might - you will never be this cool.

Action cameras are great. Their small size, plus both the features they present and the quality of media they capture make them highly useful for everything from skydiving to attaching to your cat to find out where it goes at night. However - any occasion you have to directly compare the images recorded by these teeny wonders with those of a more traditional camera will highlight the superior quality a dedicated stills unit has to offer.

The exponentially multiplying capacity of digital memory means that with a GoPro or whatever, you can just set it going at some point before the start of your jump, forget all about it until at least ten minutes after you finish packing then sift through an ungodly amount of chaff later in search of the choicest shots to share about the place. Everybody knows this is cheating though, and that photos created serendipitously by a piece of gadgetry that happens to be attached to your forehead is not your work - but is in fact the subtotal of all human endeavour leading up to this exact point, where you got lucky.

A stills camera is the tool of the craftsperson and must be activated manually when something awesome happens. There are a few choices available for this, all of which involve using your mouth to activate the camera and get the job done. As with a lot of things in skydiving, people sometimes feel very passionately about what they believe to be correct tool for the job and will offer to fight you to the death for besmirching their good word by thinking differently - and camera switches are no exception. While all pretty straightforward to operate, they each have some subtle strengths and weaknesses so a little forethought might help you arrive at what is best for you.

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This man is called Trunk. Trunk runs a company called GetHypoxic. If you are building a camera platform or simply wish to geek out about skydiving technology - this is your guy.

Bite Switch

The bite switch is either straight or L-shaped with a section somewhere in the middle that you hold between (specifically) your front teeth and bite softly to operate.

The Good:

Good Feedback: Of the choices available a bite switch provides the most satisfying little clicks to reassure you that you are getting shit done.

The Bad:

- Head Movement: Operating a bite switch involves moving your jaw a little bit to bite down, which can put a visible wiggle in your framing - particularly if you are capturing video.

- Moisture. If you eventually chew through the plastic casing, condensation or saliva can get inside and short out the connections.



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Blow Switch

The blow switch is a small unit about the size of your thumb that you mount to the outside of your helmet. The part that goes into your mouth is a straw-like tube that you blow into to activate the camera.

The Good:

- Durability. With no wires and such directly in your mouth there are fewer parts that are subject to moisture or wear, and you cannot damage it by biting too much.

The Bad:

- Low Feedback. With nothing that clicks actually pressing against any part of your mouth you do not receive any direct indication of operation from the device itself.

- Breathing. The action of blowing into a tube to depress the button can potentially disrupt your breathing, and vice-versa - having to breathe at some point can interrupt your photo taking.

- Gunk. Clean it, you filthy animal.

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Tongue Switch

The tongue switch is usually L-shaped. You grip it between your teeth wherever it feels most comfortable and depress a little button with the tippy end of your tongue.

The Good:

- Separate Actions. By holding the switch with one part of your mouth and operating the button with another, this option has a sensible tactile nature.

- Flexibility. You can hold this switch anywhere amongst your teeth that feels right for you.

The Bad:

- Due to the available mobility, the internal wiring can wiggle loose and the switch possibly wear out over time.

- Moisture. As with the bite switch - if you eventually chew through the plastic casing, condensation or saliva can get inside and short out the connections.

- Hilarity. If you use a tongue switch you will quickly grow very, very tired of jokes about your increased sexual powers - from pretty much everybody.

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A tongue switch and a bite switch respectively. Photographed on a moist houseplant.
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This is me.

The truth is that all these devices work perfectly well. I have a tongue switch now because I have always had a tongue switch. I don’t remember why that was my choice and yet I see no reason to change it. Every now and then someone will tell me it is a worthless piece of shit good only for the bin, yet I rarely miss a photo.

There is immense satisfaction to be found in ‘getting the shot’ and if you are serious about the role of aerial photographer a good stills camera is essential. High pressure situations like freefall turn small issues into bigger ones, and although just a small element your mouth switch is an important piece of your camera helmet. One that works well for your needs over something not-quite-right can be the crucial difference between kicking ass or not kicking ass much more often than you think.

About Joel Strickland:

Joel Strickland is a full time freefly coach and freelance journalist. He is also an IBA instructor trainer, an FAI judge for artistic disciplines and at the time of writing is British freefly champion with Varial Freefly. More information can be found via his personal website at www.joel-strickland.com or through the team at www.varialfreefly.com.




By Joel Strickland on 2017-12-12 | Last Modified on 2018-01-08

Rating: 12345   Go Login to rate this article.  | Votes: 3 | Comments: 3 | Views: 2377

3 Comments

Tetrahedron
Tetrahedron  2017-12-12

My blow switch doesn’t interrupt my breathing at all and I have it mounted on the inside of my helmet, not on the outside. It would be helpful if the author actually had extensive experience with all types of switches.


lucaferreira
lucaferreira  2018-01-12

Does anybody know where can I find the blow switch here in US?


lucaferreira
lucaferreira  2018-01-12

Does anybody know where can I find the blow switch here in US?


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