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Found 207 results

  1. Since 1997, USPA has selected the second weekend of March as National Skydiving Safety Day and encouraged DZs everywhere to participate. The idea is simple; have skydivers focus for a day on the skydiving information, issues, procedures and training that can keep them alive in the upcoming season.With just one life saved, the payoff is huge. Safety Day was the idea of a soft-spoken but enthusiastic woman named Patti Chernis who approached the USPA Board of Directors with the concept in 1996.The board applauded and endorsed her plan. Safety Day preparations were well underway when, in the ultimate of ironies, Chernis died while skydiving on New Year's Eve 1996, just a day before she would have been elected USPA Northwest Regional Director. It was in her honor that Safety Day began in 1997 and her legacy that it continues to grow each year. A majority of DZs now report Safety Day activities each March. Planning Safety DayHow does it work? As simply as this: First, announce to your jumpers that your DZ is hosting a Safety Day. You may want to offer incentives to boost attendance. Many DZs offer free or discounted jump tickets, free food, discounted reserve pack jobs, door prizes, or any combination. Second, select a suitable location.Think comfort. If the hangar won't be warm or large enough, consider a restaurant, school gym, motel, or veteran's lodge. Anticipate a good turnout and be sure you have room for lectures, training-harness drills, and rig inspections. Third, put a training syllabus and staff together. Feel free to use the training ideas included here, which involve the four modules or stations below, with just some ideas on content. Gear Check and Review - Have jumpers inspect their rigs with a rigger. Check closing loops and flaps, pilot chute snugness and condition, velcro, three-ring condition, RSL routing, AAD compliance with battery and fac-tory check, etc. Skydiving Emergency Review and Drills - Review all types of problems, reinforce altitude awareness, discuss disorientation, practice in a suspended harness. Canopy Flight and Landing Patterns - Use aerial photos to show acceptable and unacceptable outs, review hazards, establish or review landing patterns, and discuss canopy handling toward preventing low-turn acci-dents. Aircraft Procedures and Emergencies - Review exit order and loading procedures, seat belt and weight and balance concerns, spotting procedures, visibility minimums and cloud clearances, air traffic control require-ments, and aircraft emergency scenarios. And Fun,Too!Last, don't forget the PR. Give recognition to those who turn out and those who teach. Remember that many local news organizations may want to provide news coverage. Take pictures and send them with a brief write-up to Parachutist. And consider that the skydivers who don't participate may need more of your staff's attention when the season kicks in. Ed Scott USPA Director of Group Membership For more information got to the USPA web site
  2. Malaysian maritime police rescued skydivers from the United States and Denmark who were feared to have been blown out to sea but actually had washed ashore on a deserted beach. Derek Thomas, 44, of Zephyr Hills, Florida, and Karen Willerup of Denmark, lost during a parachute competition off the island of Borneo, sang to each other for five hours Tuesday night (Karens birthday) before help arrived. They hit gusty winds and overshot their landing zone in Menggatal district, about 60 kilometers (40 miles) from where the show "Survivor" was filmed. On Tuesday, five of the skydivers were found on shore after a two-hour search, but a bigger operation had to be mounted for Thomas and Willerup. It was believed they had been blown into the South China Sea or rugged rain forest. Thomas said he miscalculated his landing because of thick clouds. He and Willerup where doing a tandem skydive, they drifted downwind, nearly 5 kilometers (3 miles) from where they planned to land. Neither Thomas nor Willerup were injured. (Derek Thomas is the owner of SunPath Products, manufaturers of the Javelin)
  3. DELAND - A member of a Russian skydiving team was flown to a hospital Tuesday afternoon after being injured in what emergency officials described as a "hard landing." Larisa A. Sverdlenko, 31, of Moscow, was listed in stable condition at Halifax Medical Center, a spokeswoman with the Daytona Beach hospital said. Sverdlenko was participating in jumps offered by Skydive DeLand. According to EVAC officials, Sverdlenko's parachute opened, but she hit the ground at a high rate of speed. She suffered from leg fractures but was conscious when paramedics arrived.
  4. CARACAS (Reuters) - Seven people died on Saturday when a light plane carrying parachute students plunged into the Caribbean near the Venezuelan coast, local media reported. A Cessna 206 aircraft was carrying the amateur parachutists on a pleasure trip on Saturday afternoon near the tourist resort of Higuerote, 70 miles east of Caracas, when it went down. A private medical company, Elimedical, recovered the dead, apparently mostly Venezuelans, from the sea. Officials said it was unclear what caused the single-motor plane to fail.
  5. A 28-year-old Shreveport man was killed Sunday after both his parachute and reserve chute failed to open in a 10,000-foot sky diving exercise near Downtown Airport. Jason Fisher was on a normal jump with three other members of Sport City Skydivers when he was killed. His body was found near the Red River levee about 200 yards north of the airport entrance, off the airport property. It's the second time since 1960 that a local sky diver has been killed in a jump there, said Bruce Deville, director of marketing for Air One. Deville described the accident as a "no pull" in which Fisher, who was described as an intermediate diver with little more than 25 jumps, "failed to pull anything. "A no-pull situation like this is extremely rare," he said. "He also was wearing an automatic opener on his parachute and, for some reason unknown to us, it failed to open properly. Then he failed to pull his main and reserve parachutes." Investigators said Fisher was found with his arms tucked close to his body, which might indicate he was trying to pry his chute open. The rip cord on his chute appeared to be broken, said Brian Crawford, spokesman for the Shreveport Fire Department. Fisher landed head first, another indication to investigators that his body may have inverted in air while he struggled with his chute. "I think he was doing everything he could until the last minute," Crawford said. Fisher's reserve chute "popped out on impact" in the accident that occurred about 4 p.m., said Shreveport police Sgt. C.K. Taylor. "It's a terrible thing. It's a calm day with beautiful skies, and then this happens." Detectives would interview the plane's pilot and the other divers, and the Federal Aviation Administration will conduct an investigation, Taylor said. He had jumped at Shreveport on a couple occasions, Deville said. Fisher's intermediate status means he still was under some supervision but was cleared to jump on his own without supervision, Deville said. "The young man pulled nothing. The parachute never had a chance to work," Deville said. "Before the jump, everybody was excited. But they're all shook up right now."
  6. The pilot of a skydiving plane apparently lost control of his aircraft and crashed off Mokuleia in 1999 because he was suffering from hypoxia -- a lack of oxygen to the brain -- from repeated flights to altitudes above 18,000 feet without the use of an oxygen mask. Shawn Gloyer, 48, died when the Beechcraft B-90 he was piloting crashed into the ocean 1.5 miles northeast of Dillingham Airfield in Mokuleia on May 22, 1999. His body was never found. The impact was so severe that only pieces of the aircraft, owned by Pacific International Skydiving Center, were found after they sank to a depth of about 156 feet. A National Transportation Safety Board accident report said the crash occurred after the 12th sport parachute jump of the day. Witnesses said the plane went down nose first without the engines sputtering or popping or making any erratic movements. Skydivers said that two pervious jumps had been made from 18,000 feet, and the last jump was from 20,000 feet. "During the final jump flight, one of the skydivers stated he had a hard time breathing and felt nauseous," the accident report said. "The skydivers noted that the pilot was unable to maintain a steady course and did not respond well to minor course corrections. No supplemental oxygen was found during the recovery or subsequent inspection phases of the investigation." The plane's pressurization system would have been inoperable because the cockpit door could not be sealed. Hypoxia occurs when a person is deprived of oxygen, resulting in poor judgment and reaction time. It can result in loss of consciousness with little or no warning. A couple of the skydivers had paid Gloyer to climb to 20,000 feet for the day's last jump, which occurred 20 minutes after sunset. However, the parachutists jumped without any lights, which are required by the Federal Aviation Administration for night jumps. The pilot also had not made any of the required radio calls to the air traffic control center, nor did he report that he planned to make any jumps above 16,000 feet.
  7. TOOELE, Utah (AP) - A twin-engine plane returning from a skydiving trip crashed into the Great Salt Lake, killing all nine people on board. The plane was on a flight from Mesquite, Nev., when it went down in about 5 feet of water around 5:30 p.m. Sunday. Airport officials didn't know it was missing until a relative of a passenger called hours later. Helicopters and boats were used to recover the bodies of the pilot and eight passengers early Monday, said Frank Scharmann, a spokesman for the Tooele County sheriff's office. The 35-year-old Beech 65 plane was headed for Tooele County Airport, about five miles south of the lake. It crashed about a mile offshore. Airport officials were not expecting the plane because the pilot had not registered a flight plan, so radar tape recordings had to be checked to determine the time of the crash. The tapes indicated the plane was banking and that it may have spiraled into the lake, Scharmann said. There had been no distress signal. Duck hunters along the lake's south shore found parachutes, clothing, the pilot's log book and other debris Monday morning. "It smells like fuel out here. It's kind of an eerie feeling," said Tim Bryan, 31, one of the hunters. Snow fell intermittently throughout the day Sunday, but there was no immediate indication if the weather contributed to the crash. The passengers, members of a group called Skydive Salt Lake, had spent the weekend jumping during the day and camping in sleeping bags at the Mesquite Municipal Airport at night, airport manager Ray Wilson said. He said they took off for Tooele about two hours before the crash. The dead were identified as the pilot, John T. Cashmen, 41; and passengers Mike C. Hurren, 51, a co-owner of Skydive Salt Lake; his wife, Gayle Hurren, 45; Lisa Ellise, 34; Nathan B. Hall, 29; Denise Stott, 26; Charles Wilson, 31; Merriah Hutson, 25; and Jay Johnson, 24.
  8. Michael "Schlefy" Schaefer was involved in a fatal BASE incident on Friday, December 29th due to an off-heading opening from a cliff in Arizona. Schlefy was a beloved staff member of Chicagoland Skydiving in Hinckley, IL. A memorial fund has been set up for Schlefy's young sister and the restof his family in Germany. The Schlefy Memorial Fund PO Box 758 Hinckley, IL 60520 Chicagoland Skydiving manifest@chicagolandskydiving.com www.skydive.com
  9. A 42-year-old man from Germany died in a skydiving accident Wednesday at Lake Wales Airport. Witnesses said Manfred Klaiber, of Munich, Germany, was an estimated 100 feet off the ground when it appeared he attempted to do a stunt of some sort, Lake Wales police reports said. Klaiber made a sharp right turn, then went straight down, the report said. Klaiber's wife, Andrea Klaiber, told police her husband has been skydiving for four years and Wednesday was his 100th jump. Andrea Klaiber also said her husband was using a new chute and it was his first time jumping with it. Andrea Klaiber could not be reached for comment Thursday. Certified chute packer Angela Hatchette told police she couldn't find anything wrong with the chute, the report stated. Hatchette declined to comment Thursday. The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified of the incident and the case is still under investigation. Klaiber was the second person to die Wednesday in a parachute accident in Florida. Chantal Bonitto of New York City was killed when her parachute failed to open while skydiving near DeLand. Bonitto, 31, was an experienced skydiver with more than 100 dives, said DeLand police Lt. Paul Proctor.
  10. DELAND -- A skydiver plummeted to her death Wednesday evening near U.S. 92, and investigators worked well into the night trying to determine exactly what happened during the final moments of her fall. Chantal Bonitto, 31, of New York City, was pronounced dead at the scene, an EVAC spokesman said. Her body was discovered shortly after 5:30 p.m. in a wooded area along U.S. 92, directly behind the Flo Met office building at 810 Flight Line Blvd. Bonitto was vacationing in the area and was taking part in jumps offered by Skydive DeLand, according to the DeLand Police Department. She was no stranger to skydiving, having completed at least 100 jumps, said DeLand Police Lt. Paul Proctor. "It's still too early to tell what happened," Proctor said Wednesday night. "At 100 jumps, it would seem to be they know what they're doing to a certain degree." Proctor said people who witnessed Bonitto's fall offered conflicting stories as to whether the woman's parachute opened. "That's where some of the stories differ," he said. Some eyewitnesses reported they did not see a parachute open. Others, Proctor said, reported seeing Bonitto perform a "cut-away," detaching herself from the primary parachute in an effort to deploy a back-up canopy. Proctor said local investigators, along with the Federal Aviation Administration, will investigate the incident. He said more witnesses would be interviewed, including the pilot of the plane from which Bonitto jumped. Bonitto was married, and her husband was at the scene Wednesday night. His name was not immediately available. Proctor said he did not know if Bonitto's husband was a skydiver. Skydiving injuries and fatal accidents occur sporadically in DeLand, Proctor said, due in part to the sheer volume of participants. Skydive DeLand officials have previously said they average nearly 85,000 jumps per year. "There are just a huge number of skydivers in the area," Proctor said. Two skydivers were reported injured in April, one of them critically. In April 1999, a French skydiver died after her parachute malfunctioned and failed to open properly. The 55-year-old woman was an experienced skydiver with more than 500 jumps. 2000 News-Journal Corp.
  11. For all who know Mago, This Sunday we will remember Mago in our heartsWe'll Fly at sunset thinking of your Dream, the dream of Flight, Pure Human Flight, which is also our dream in which we truly believe, instinctively. We'll think of the Dream of the Flying Crew, your Dream, our Dream. We'll think of the beautiful energy that you brought to us, like Magic, and you still bring to us. We'll keep your Dream Alive. This is our commitment. Thank you with all our heart for everything you did for us as a group and you will do for us as a group. You are in a new dimension now and can see and feel things far beyond our own perceptions. Right now you Are, you truly Are. We miss you a fucking Lots MAGICIAN OF ROME in the Air and on the ground! There's a phrase that I was reading in a book, for coincidence, or not, right the day before you Flew a away in your new dimension. It is from The Book : The Vision Quest from Thomas Brown, even if the phrase comes from Marcus Aurelius: "Man should fear not dying, what man should fear is Not Having Lived at All." You lived your life at the fullest and always being true with yourself, always bringing Good Energy, never giving a chance to the bad energy to be fed upon bad feelings or week feeling of your own or the others around. Foreseeing much deeper into Reality and the Future and of course the Past, always seeing people for what They Really Where, without being driven out of track by the appearance or by the outside stories.... your reaction to this instead have been feeding us the Dream of Flight with your Art, your Music Art, your Flying Art your Video Art. In this you've been a great teacher as you you will always be. Ciao Magico ! You are Strong ! Stefania and the 1st School of Modern Skyflying, The Freefly Circus, The Flying Crew Love you for ever ! Keep the Dream Rise to the Top to The Top ! Italian freefly champion Mauro "Mago" Tannino died at Ravenna in Italy on August 12th. He was filming a student when he expereiced a mulfunction. Unable to cut away he deployed his reserve and died on impact under resulting the main-reserve entanglement.
  12. BASE Jumper Rescued in Cincinnati CINCINNATI (AP) - A parachutist had to be rescued Friday night after he jumped from a downtown office building and snagged his parachute on the 29th floor of a nearby hotel, authorities said. Witnesses said they saw two people jump from the 49th floor observation tower of the Carew Tower, the city's tallest building. The first parachutist landed safely, they said, but the second got caught and ended up on a ledge outside a closed hotel room window. "He did two flips and then he snagged on the corner of the hotel and then he swung around and smacked into the building," said Meg Jahnes, a downtown worker who was in a parking garage at the time. Jahnes said the man was still attached to his chute, which remained caught on the corner of the building. "He just grabbed that window and hung on," she said. Rescue crews pulled the man to safety through the hotel room window about 20 minutes later and arrested the man. The other jumper wasn't immediately found. Cincinnati Police Sgt. Paul Broxterman said the man wasn't injured.Broxterman said he wasn't sure what charges would be filed against him. He said that when police asked why he jumped, the man said: "It's what I do." The Associated Press Skydiver Hang Under Plane for Half and HourDUNBAR, Pa. (AP) - A skydiver hung helplessly in the air for half an hour when his boot got caught on the underside of a plane he had jumped out of. He survived with only minor cuts and bruises. Andy Judy of Morgantown, W.Va., was trapped 10,500 feet above the ground Saturday until the Cessna 182 touched down and he was freed. "When we got to him, he looked at us and said, 'My gosh, am I lucky,"' said Don Bick, co-owner of the Pittsburgh Skydiving Center in Dunbar, about 40 miles southeast of Pittsburgh. Judy was one of four skydivers attempting a group jump Saturday when he got caught under the plane. His parachute was not damaged, so he tried unsuccessfully to free himself by unzipping and unfastening his flying suit and boots. Officials at Connersville Airport in Unbar sent another plane into the air to try to help, but that pilot "determined there was nothing to do," Bike said. The pilot of the Cesura finally decided to land in a field beside the airport's paved runway, hoping the ground would be soft. Bike, state police and onlookers quickly scoured the grass and runway for rocks and sharp objects that could injure Judy. "We had every bit of emergency medical services crews available in the county standing by," Bike said.
  13. Nicole Cadiz wanted one more sky dive before the day's end, but she never expected it to be her last. The 26-year-old woman died Saturday evening after winds ripped off her harness during a 13,500-foot free fall at the Parachute Center in Acampo, just north of Lodi, according to the San Joaquin County Coroner's Office. Cadiz, an experienced parachutist with more than 1,000 jumps under her belt, had executed eight leaps earlier in the day. Then, on her ninth just before 7:40 p.m., high-velocity winds snatched her harness and chute off her back. Parachute Center owner Bill Dause said Cadiz then attempted, but failed, to get back into her harness, and she plummeted to the ground. Paramedics found her in a neighboring vineyard. Her new husband, Anthony, was one of seven others making the jump with Cadiz. Dause attributed the accident to an unclipped chest strap -- which he could not explain -- and Cadiz's upside-down position in midair. "Skydiving is a high-risk act, but with the equipment we have, it's got to be a combination of things that go wrong for that to happen," he said. "It wasn't just that the chest strap was undone, but also her position in the air." The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration investigates parachuting accidents, but representatives from the agencies could not be reached Sunday. Cadiz, an Acampo resident, worked as a manicurist in Lodi, though friends said her real passion was sky diving every weekend at the Parachute Center, where she first learned the sport seven years ago and became adept enough to work as a sky videographer. "She loved sky diving, she was always here," said a 21-year-old friend who was one of seven others with Cadiz on her fatal jump. "She was well-liked by everyone here. Her whole life was this drop zone." "It's just devastating, we're all devastated by this," added Jan Davis, who was editing a parachuting videotape on Sunday. The last parachuting death in the Sacramento region occurred at the Parachute Center last October when a 23-year-old Orangevale man committed suicide, said coroner's Deputy Al Ortiz. Nationwide, 32 of the 3.25 million parachute jumps made in 1997 resulted in fatalities, according to the U.S. Parachute Association, an Alexandria, Va.-based group that sets safety and training guidelines for the sport. Some at the Parachute Center were visibly shaken Sunday, but they still moved about the hangarlike building, packing their parachutes and watching others descend from the sky. Dause said parachutists understand their sport's inherent dangers and know that tragedies like Cadiz's can happen. Still, their love of the sport compels them to continue. "Everybody's sad," he said between flights. "But we've just got to bite our tongues and keep going." To see more of the Sacramento Bee, or to subscribe, go to http://www.sacbee.com © 2000 Sacramento Bee.
  14. Man dies, another injured after collision DAYTON TOWNSHIP -- The death of a Missoula, Mont., skydiver and the serious injury of another Sunday ended Skydive Chicago's attempt to break the world record for the number of skydivers in a free-fall formation. Paul L. Adams, 54, died during a mid-air collision with Kenneth Reed, 22, of Holts Summit, Mo., during an 10:30 a.m. jump, the 22nd jump record attempt. Reed was taken to Community Hospital of Ottawa, and was later airlifted to OSF St. Francis Medical Center in Peoria, where he remains in critical condition this morning. Sunday was the last day for the skydivers to break the record -- they had been attempting since Aug. 13, and had scheduled 24 jumps. The accident is being investigated by the La Salle County Sheriff's Department and the La Salle County Coroner's Office. "Unfortunately, on this jump, people from two different waves somehow crossed," said Roger Nelson, Skydive Chicago program director and jump participant. "We've had no problem on the other jumps." The decision was made after the accident to stop the world record attempt. The skydivers began to open their parachutes at about 7,500 feet, according to Nelson. Chutes are opened in "waves," meaning skydivers from the outer, middle, and inner rings of the flower-shaped formation open at different times and altitudes to avoid collisions. Adams opened his parachute first, and immediately struck Reed, Nelson said. Reed's parachute opened, and their passengers floated to the ground. Both divers were equipped with devices to automatically open the parachutes at a preset altitude. Adams was reported missing shortly after the jump. Each skydiver is required to check in immediately with a captain after landing to maintain accountability in the record attempt. The collision was spotted by another diver, who reported it to a ground medic. Adams' body was located by a spotter plane carrying Nelson, who jumped from the plane and landed near Adams' body in a cornfield off the runway. Nelson began yelling during the descent that he found Adams, said Sheriff Thomas Templeton. Nelson separated from his parachute and ran toward Adams. Adams was pronounced dead at the scene at 12:24 p.m., said La Salle County Coroner Jody Bernard. An autopsy is scheduled for later today. Bernard did not know if Adams was killed in the collision, but said at a minimum he was knocked unconscious. Reed was located before Adams. He was found in a soybean field about 350 yards west of East 19th Road, Templeton said. The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the accident, Nelson said, and examine the equipment used by the skydivers. Nelson said that the equipment Adams used is in perfect working condition, and that the accident wasn't anybody's fault. The death marks the seventh since Skydive Chicago moved to its present location in 1993. ................... Victim `had passion for skydiving' Paul Adams planned to take Amber Taylor and her roommate -- who rented the basement of his Missoula, Mont., home -- skydiving with him when he returned from the world-record attempt in Ottawa. "He talked about (skydiving) a lot. He was always trying to get us to go," Taylor said. When they agreed, "he was all excited to take us when he got back." She learned Sunday he had been killed in an accident that morning, and it looks like she and her roommate won't be making that jump for a while. "It's not because of the accident, really," Taylor said. "It's because he's not here. He was an amazing guy. He treated us awesome." Adams, 54, had given Taylor a $70 watch when she graduated from the University of Montana this spring, and he bought his tenants a new refrigerator for their apartment, she said. Before he left for Illinois, he was in the yard, excitedly showing the women a diagram of the formation planned for the world-record attempt. He told them he was a little nervous, Taylor said. Adams' ex-wife, Brenda Elvey of Missoula, said skydiving was a natural part of life while they were married, and the two have maintained a friendly relationship since their 1992 divorce. They have two adult children, Beth and Steven. Elvey estimated Adams had been skydiving for more than 30 years. When the couple would move to a new town, the first thing he would do is search out the nearest place to skydive, she said. "He really loved it. He had a sense of adventure. He had a passion for skydiving, and that probably grew the more he did it. "He had had a couple small injuries before, broken bones in his foot and different things like that, but that never seemed to bother him or set him back, or make him not want to do it. He really enjoyed a lot of things -- scuba diving, hunting -- but skydiving was his biggest passion. "I think he was very responsible; he wasn't foolhardy. I think he was very much safety first," she said. "I think he was a Christian man. He liked skydiving, traveling and he enjoyed his kids." Mick Fauske, who worked with Adams at Montana Rail Link, said Adams was "thrilled" to be asked to join the record attempt, and proud he was one of the oldest people participating. The two men hunted together, but Adams had never persuaded Fauske to jump. "I'm not much of a heights person, but he enjoyed it," Fauske said. " (He liked) the thrill of it, the idea of flying. I know it was his favorite sport." Adams had been a railroad engineer for more than 30 years -- for Burlington Northern and Union Pacific before Montana Rail Link formed in 1987 -- and both Elvey and Fauske praised his railroading abilities. Elvey said, "I know he could run an engine by how the seat felt. He was a good engineer." "He was a really good guy," Fauske said. "He took care of his family. He was a good railroader; he was a good skydiver." "He'll be missed," Taylor said. "We're all still in shock here." © The Daily Times http://www.ottawadailytimes.com/odtnews/news4.htm
  15. Skydive Chicago - Ottawa, Illinois US Day 8, Jump #22. This jump showed promise, but did not build completely. During break off, there was an in-air collision between two skydivers. This resulted in the injury of one and the tragic fatality of the other. In light of this incident and the obvious solemn mood of all the participants, we are ending the record camp. Pending notification of the family members, identities of the two skydivers are not currently being released. Parachute Center in Lodi, California Saturday evening Nicole Sadek-Cadiz was killed in a skydiving accident at the Parachute Center in Lodi, CA. She was doing a sunset load freefly jump with friends. According to a skydiver on the jump with her, there was a freeze frame of video which showed her on climb out with her chest strap dangling. At approximately 7000 feet a panning video showed a few frames of her in a head down with the rig peeling off her shoulders. She apparently struggled with the rig for a few thousand feet. At around normal deployment altitude the main was somehow deployed, and she was seen was seen falling back to earth away from the main. At first thought to be a cutaway, it was soon clear that the main was flying almost completely inflated, in slow spirals with the rig suspended beneath it. ~ Jan Davis: from rec.skydiving: Ravenna, Italy The Italian freeflyer Mauro "Mago" Tannino died in Ravenna,Italy during a camera jump with a student on August,12. Early reports suggests that he failed to jettison a partially deployed main chute and pulled the reserve which resulted a main-reserve entaglement. No further information is available at this time.
  16. BASE jumpers plan to congregate at Mineral Canyon near Moab in November to "celebrate the lives" of two colleagues who died July 18 when their single-engine airplane crashed while scouting jump sites near the head of the canyon. Clint Ford, 22, of Brush, Colo., and Earl Redfern, 43, of Moab, were killed instantly when the wing of Ford's Grumman AA-5 Traveler apparently clipped the edge of the canyon wall and the plane crashed into a rock talus slope and burned. The pair had left the Moab airport on the afternoon of July 18, when temperatures were recorded between 105 and 108 degrees, did not file a flight plan and triggered a five-day aerial search by the Civil Air Patrol, local pilots, the Utah Highway Patrol and Grand County Sheriff. The crash site was 15 miles southwest of the airport and two miles outside the northern boundary of Canyonlands National Park. Redfern was an internationally known BASE jumper who was the first to successfully jump off several pinnacles and cliffs in the Moab area. He also was an experienced commercial pilot who flew air taxi service regularly in the canyons, where summer heat and unpredictable wind currents create hazardous flying conditions. Clint Ford had recently obtained his pilot's license; authorities were unable to determine who was piloting the plane. News of the two men's deaths was posted on a popular BASE jumping Web site (www.baselogic.com) and was greeted with expressions of condolences from around the world. "Thanks to Earl for opening up many new sites in Moab for the sport of BASE jumping's future," wrote Susan Eddy. "He left a legacy for us to follow. Remember, be cautious always and have fun." Added another BASE jumper: "Let's take time to reflect on the good times we had with our fallen brothers. Fly high, Clint. On headings, Earl. We will miss you both." Enthusiasts plan to gather Nov. 4 in Mineral Canyon to honor the men with an impromptu celebration of BASE jumping. Since Mineral Canyon is located on BLM land, the activity is legal. In nearby Canyonlands National Park, BASE jumping is banned. "We don't have a lot of BASE jumping going on in the park simply because there's hundreds of miles of cliffs on BLM land that have roads on the top and roads on the bottom, which allows them to do several jumps in a short time," said Steve Swanke, Canyonlands district ranger in Moab. "The park does not have that kind of road access. So you find in season, there are thousands of BASE jumps happening on a weekly basis on the BLM lands here." © 2000 The Salt Lake Tribune
  17. Harness Container was a Telesis 2, Main was a Navigator 280, Reserve a PD253R Training background: Deceased was trained by a highly experienced USPA AFF and military instructor. The training was a military exercise done strictly in accordance with USPA guidelines. Deceased had made 5 prior jumps, with good to excellent performance on all jumps, with the exception of a tendency to dip right side low on deployment. This was his second jump of the day. His training records reflected corrective training on body position at pull time. Description of incident: The AFF Level 6 jump went as planned, with excellent performance by the deceased. He waved and pulled at 4500' as planned. His body position at pull time was right side low due to knee dropped. Deployment appeared to progress normally to the jumpmaster. The jumpmaster did not see full canopy deployment. Deceased was next seen at approximately 2500' with a main/reserve entanglement. He was seen trying to clear the entanglement until impact. Post jump inspection found that the cutaway handle and reserve ripcords had been pulled. The kink in the reserve ripcord cable caused by RSL activation eliminated the possibility that the deceased had pulled the handles in the wrong order. The reserve bridle was found entangled with the right main line group. The main canopy was twisted in such a way that it appeared to have hung up on the left (RSL) side. Final inspection of the equipment revealed that the slider bumper on the right rear riser may have snagged the reserve static line, causing the dual deployment. Pulling the cutaway handle may have taken away this jumper's only chance of survival. To put the jump in the most likely order of events: Deceased deployed right side low. Right rear riser slider bumper snagged RSL during deployment. Main deployed normally. Reserve partially deployed. Deceased saw main and reserve out, with malfunctioning reserve. Deceased pulled cutaway handle and reserve ripcord. The resulting entanglement was not surviveable. This sequence of events is considered the most likely scenario based on the available information. It should be noted that in this, as is the case of all fatality reports, the person with the most information is unfortunately, unable to provide his or her input. Conclusions: It must be stressed that the pull priorities of : Pull Pull at the correct altitude Pull at the correct altitude with stability still apply. Stability at pull time great improves the probability of one good fully functional parachute. Sacrificing altitude for stability still is not a viable alternative. Even in an unstable body position at deployment time, the chances of a good parachute are very high. A review of different 2 canopies out scenarios, and practicing procedures in a suspended harness, or even a conversation with a very knowledgeable Instructor to review your current philosophy on different 2 canopies out scenarios may be enough to save your life.
  18. LAKE ELSINORE -- A Navy SEAL from Chula Vista practicing a freefall sky diving technique died during a training exercise Wednesday when his chute appeared to malfunction. Michael Bearden, 27, apparently died upon impact after falling into the Lake Elsinore flood plain in Riverside County, less than a mile from Skylark Airport. He was practicing accelerated freefall techniques at a civilian sky diving area, according to Lt. Cmdr. Jeff Alderson. The Navy Special Warfare Command is investigating. Riverside County coroners are treating his death as an accident. The unit was working on earning the necessary freefall qualifications to be a SEAL, Alderson said. A witness told the Riverside Press-Enterprise that it appeared Bearden's main chute had become tangled with a secondary chute. Steven Stetzel, who lives in a nearby housing tract, told the Press-Enterprise that he immediately called 911 after seeing the man plummet to earth. He rushed to the airport to report what had happened. Another SEAL from the group training with Bearden landed less than a minute after and tried to perform CPR, but investigators say the man almost certainly died on impact.The Riverside County Sheriff's/Coroner's Office is treating his death as accidental. Bearden is the third person to die in a skydiving accident in Lake Elsinore in the past four years, according to the Press-Enterprise. One of those deaths occurred after a skydiver got caught in one of the many "dust devils," columns of swirling wind and dust, that appear on the flood plain throughout the summer. The Corondao-based SEAL Team Five would continue its sky diving training, authorities said. The Associated Press contributed to this report
  19. PRODUCTION work on the new BBC Northern Ireland television series Rebel Heart was halted while producer Malcolm Craddock and director John Strickland attended the funeral in Surrey of stuntman Terry Forrestal. The 52-year-old ex-soldier who served with the SAS in Northern Ireland, was killed on a base-jumping expedition in Norway. He broke his legs in a parachute leap from the 3,000 feet Kjerag Cliff in Lysefjord. After lying for several hours on a ridge undetected Forrestal is thought to have attempted a second jump from the ridge and died when his reserve 'chute failed to open. He was one of the leading stuntmen in the movie business and had just finished work in Dublin on Rebel Heart, a series about the 1916 Uprising. He had organised battle scenes and guerrilla ambushes in the Wicklow Hills. "Terry was really enthusiastic about this series," says producer Craddock. He made a fantastic contribution to Rebel Heart and when it is screened next year it will be his fitting epitaph."Forrestal was born in Chesterfield and wanted to be a doctor, but he joined the Territorial Army in 1975 and graduated to the SAS at Hereford and became a senior NCO in Northern Ireland. When he moved into the film world he quickly became established as one of the top stuntmen. He worked on films like Titanic, Robin Hood Prince of Thieves and several of the James Bond series and in television he was involved in arranging scenes in Danger field, Eastenders and London's Burning. Forrestal,who was unmarried, was buried at Childrey near Wantage in Surrey. His freak death has sparked off a debate on the merits and safety of base-jumping. To see more of the Belfast Telegraph or, to subscribe, go to http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk
  20. admin

    Student Fatality in Israel

    (IsraelWire-7/3) A man who was learning skydiving in the SkyDive School on Friday was killed when his parachute failed to open during his second jump of the day. The 21-year-old student was killed after his main and secondary chutes failed to open during his second jump. Minister of Science, Culture & Sport Matan Vilnai has ordered an investigation. It was pointed out that the school has been operating for several years and never had an accident.
  21. Panama City Beach Florida PANAMA CITY BEACH, Fla. Minnesota National Guardsman killed in skydiving mishap: A Minnesota Air National Guard technical sergeant was killed after landing improperly during a skydiving jump. Benjamin A. Freeman, 31, died Tuesday after jumping from an airplane 3,000 feet high near Eagle Air Sports, a small airport near Panama City Beach. Jennifer Collins, a spokeswoman for the Bay County Sheriff's Office, said human error appeared to have been the cause of the accident. "The parachute deployed normally and he was doing some simple maneuvers," she said. "There was nothing odd with the plane or the equipment. He was an experienced jumper." Freeman, a full-time guardsman, was stationed at nearby Tyndall Air Force Base, where he was part of an alert detachment of the Minnesota Guard's 148th Fighter Wing, said Maj. Don Arias, a spokesman for the 1st Air Force at Tyndall. Ground crew members such as Freeman are on permanent status at Tyndall while pilots rotate from Minnesota. Freeman had recently moved here from Tulsa, Okla., where he had been with the Oklahoma Air National Guard, Arias said. His wife and child were at the airport at the time of the accident. The Air Force Office of Special Investigation and Bay County Sheriff's deputies were still investigating. Chico Hot Springs Montana A Great Falls skydiver who did a trick turn to pick up speed as he was coming in for a landing at Chico Hot Springs Saturday died of multiple injuries after hitting the ground. Philip Moore, 39, and an experienced jumper, suffered multiple traumatic injuries when he landed hard in a field near the horse barn about 2:30 p.m., said Park County Coroner Al Jenkins. Moore was participating in an annual Chico jump meet. He died aboard a Life-Flight helicopter taking him to St. Vincent Hospital in Billings. "This is a terrible tragedy at a really positive and high-energy event, and everybody is just sick," said Colin Davis, Chico's general manager. The accident happened as Moore was coming in for a landing, said sky diver Chris Trujillo of Casper, Wyo., who witnessed Moore's jump. "Everything looked normal until the last few seconds," Trujillo said. Moore was coming down under a full canopy, and as he made his final approach, he did a hook turn. A hook turn allows a sky diver to get a little more speed and sets him up for a fast approach on landing. "He didn't recover from the hook turn fast enough," Trujillo said. "There may have been turbulence in the air." He described the winds as "light to moderate, well within the safety range" for sky diving. He speculated that circular winds may have complicated Moore's landing. "It's one of those fluke things that just happened," he said. "We've made thousands of skydives here." After Moore's hard landing, two doctors, who happened to be driving by the resort, gave Moore CPR and attempted to stabilize him until emergency medical technicians arrived from Emigrant and Livingston. The Life-Flight helicopter was called. At least 60 sky divers from throughout the nation were attending the annual event. Sky divers stopped jumping for a while after the accident, but resumed about 5 p.m., Davis said. Plans are to continue the meet Sunday. An investigation is under way by the coroner and Park County sheriff's deputies. Jenkins said he is awaiting the results of autopsy toxicology.
  22. An airplane crash that killed a pilot and five skydivers in Grain Valley in 1998 probably was caused by preflight errors that led to a loss of oil and to rod failures in the engine, according to investigators' final report. A report released over the weekend by the National Transportation Safety Board concluded that the pilot, David G. Snyder of Independence, inadequately prepared the single-engine plane before the flight. No safety board spokesman could be reached for comment on Sunday. Leaking oil apparently led to overheating and engine failure, the report said. The oil filler tube was missing and screws were either missing or loose. Connecting rods in two of the plane's six cylinders were found unattached to the crankshaft. Shortly into the flight, which originated at Independence Memorial Airport, Snyder told air traffic controllers he was canceling skydiving operations. Witnesses reported seeing white and black smoke and hearing a banging sound from the plane. The 1979 model Cessna 206 crashed and burned at the East Kansas City Airport in Grain Valley on March 21, 1998. Skydiving passengers who were killed were Marion C. Rudder, 47, of Oskaloosa, Kan.; John H. Schuman, 47, of Lawrence; Kenneth L. Buckley, 50, of Independence; Paul Eric Rueff, 32, of Kansas City, Kan.; and Julie L. Douglass, 24, of Kansas City. Snyder, 55, was the registered owner of the plane. He obtained his commercial pilot certificate in 1971 and was rated to fly by visual flight rules, which he was doing on the day of the crash. Snyder was flying for the Greater Kansas City Skydiving Club, which was based at the Independence airport. The club does not have a listed telephone number, and its officers could not be reached Sunday. Chris Hall, president of a separate operation in Lee's Summit called Skydive Kansas City Inc., said he frequently gets calls from people trying to locate the former Independence outfit. The safety board's finding of probable cause differs with a theory propounded by Kansas City lawyer Gary C. Robb, who represents the families of four of the dead skydivers in a lawsuit against the engine manufacturer, Teledyne Industries Inc. Robb contends there were metallurgical faults in the engine's connecting rods. Robb could not be reached Sunday, and the status of the lawsuit could not immediately be determined. Robert Cotter, a local lawyer representing Teledyne, has said the crash was a result of maintenance problems. Federal Aviation Administration records show that a certified mechanic had declared the aircraft and its engine airworthy four months before the crash. Work was done on the plane's cylinders and rings one month before the crash, and work was done on the oil pump one week before the crash. A second certified mechanic declared it airworthy at that time. Investigators looking at the wreckage found that the engine and the left side of the fuselage, including the wing and strut, were covered with oil film. A metal oil filler tube, the piece to which the oil cap connects, was missing and the screws that would have connected it were not found. In addition, five of six screws connecting the rocker-arm cover to cylinder number 6 were missing, and the sixth one was loose. Holes were found on the left crankcase near cylinders 2 and 6, the two in which the connecting rods were unattached. "The engine's internal components suffered damage typical of oil loss and heat distress," the safety board report states. The fatal flight took off with a full load of passengers shortly after 5:30 p.m. on a Saturday. Snyder made contact as "Skydive Six" with air traffic controllers and apparently left his radio microphone on, or it was stuck in the on position. About eight minutes after Snyder indicated he was going to climb to 11,000 feet above sea level, the controller reported hearing, "What the hell was that?" In his last transmission Snyder announced, without explanation, that he was canceling the jump. Radar indicates the highest altitude the plane achieved was 5,200 feet above sea level or roughly 4,400 feet above the ground. Witnesses eight miles northeast of the Grain Valley airport reported seeing white and black smoke trailing from the plane. A witness two miles north of the airport reported hearing a banging sound. At the airport witnesses saw flames from the engine licking the windshield. The plane clipped some trees just south of the airport. Its right wing struck the ground, and the craft cartwheeled and burned. Buckley, Rueff, Rudder and Schuman all were experienced skydivers. Douglass was to make her first jump. Ron Sharp, who was president of the Greater Kansas City Skydiving Club, said a few days after the crash that the Cessna 206 had been in the air several times already that day. At one point the engine became flooded and the plane was allowed to sit awhile. Later, after the battery was recharged, another pilot took it up for a test flight, Sharp said. Then Snyder took off with his passengers. "It sounded good," Sharp said at the time. "It sounded perfect."
  23. A Nomad jump plane had to make an emergency landing last Tuesday at the Begian DZ Leopoldburg after the left engine burst into flames. The plane was on jumprun to drop the 12 static line students that were on board. After dropping 3 or 4 students, there was a sudden explosion of the left engine and it started burning. The instructors on board dropped the remaining students, while the pilot was performing the emergency procedure. There was no panic on board and both the instructors and pilot did an excellent job. The pilot managed to land the plane safely in a nearby field. The left engine is completely burned and there is probably some structural damage to the wing. Translated from http://www.xs4all.nl/~jjacobs/vvp/mededeling.html
  24. A skydiver (21) passed away in hospital following serious injuries sustained in a May 7 accident at Rygge Parachute Club (Norway). Reserve canopy fired into main and entangled. The student skydiver impacted under spinning canopies and was airlifted to hospital with critical injuries. All Norwegian student rigs equipped with an FXC automatic opener is grounded pending further investigations. From http://www.skyshop.net/
  25. A jump plane crashed at Skydive Breitscheid in Germany after dropping eight jumpers. On board were the pilot and a second person. The pilot crashed with the plane and the wreckage totally burned out. The passenger who was also wearing a parachute (it's not known whether it was skydiving gear or a pilot rescue rig) jumped from the crashing plane but fell to his death. No further information the accident is available at this time.