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  1. After a hyped release and what looked on paper to be an outstanding action camera, the GoPro Hero 3 has come under all kinds of scrutiny since its release late last year. While there appears to be a large number of users who are happy with their purchase, there is also a fair sized pool of users who are not happy with their product. A page on the Gethypoxic website dedicated to listing each of the GoPro Hero 3's issues, as well as potential workarounds has seen comments from a vast amount of users who feel as though their purchase of the Hero 3 was a mistake, many of whom recommend that those with GoPro Hero 2s avoid the upgrade to the Hero 3, citing that the GoPro Hero 2 offers a more stable and in turn, better user experience. One user who claims to have more than 20 years of software experience, suggests that the Hero 3 was rushed out too quickly in order to meet seasonal demands. He goes on to cite the need for an 'out of the box' update requirement. The IssuesOne of the more noted problems with the GoPro Hero 3, is the lack of continuous exposure adjustment when using the 'Photo Every Second' mode, which takes a still photo every second. The Hero 3 Black will set the exposure when it is turned on and fail to then adjust to allow for still images to be properly exposed, should one move from a dark to a light environment. Instead the exposure is locked to the automatic exposure setting based on the lighting when the camera is first turned on. Of course this means that skydivers, who will be exiting into much lighter conditions, will almost always end up with washed out images. This renders the 'Photo Every Second' mode virtually useless to skydivers. One would have to start the camera once one had already exited, a less than desirable action to have to do. The GoPro Hero 3 has also been known to turn off at unexpected times, often during connection to a television display or when using the USB cable to download. The cause for these shutdowns are not known, but there is the assumption that it may be related to an overheating problem. There have been many accounts of cameras freezing or locking up during filming. Several other small and more isolated issues also exist with the GoPro Hero 3 range. A number of other issues were present at the time of the camera's release, though updates released by GoPro since then have managed to fix many of them. Is it all a bit late though? With the current action camera market seemingly exploding, steps such as releasing a camera before sufficient testing can prove dangerous. One thing that has to go to GoPro is that they are generally quite quick to release updates to fix certain issues. We are however surprised that the exposure issue, which proves to render an entire feature useless for a certain market - has not yet been fixed. Good NewsThe good news for GoPro fans or those with the Hero 3 that are still encountering the exposure lock issue, is that GoPro have responded to the bug, which as it turns out - isn't a bug at all. A forum user posted the following response from GoPro regarding this issue: "Sorry about the problems with exposure locking in the two shortest time lapse intervals. Would you believe that was intended as a feature and it's not a bug? My understanding is that some folks in the skydiving community asked for it, but since then we've heard lots of complaints from other skydivers, so we've asked the engineering folks to make it an option you can turn on or off. For now be aware that in the two shortest time lapse modes, 0.5 and 1.0 seconds, the exposure will latch on to the values encountered at the first frame. For time lapse intervals of 2.0 seconds and longer each frame will be imaged using auto exposure. Remember that if auto-exposure results in flickering you can improve and smooth out the assembled video by invoking the De-flicker filter from the Advanced Settings menu of our free Cineform Studio software. Keep an eye on the forums and check in to the firmware update page every few weeks for when the update hits. Thank you so much for your feedback." GOPRO HERO 3 Black Firmware revision 02.37While the above quote seemed to suggest that there would be a fix for the exposure lock in the latest firmware upgrade, it seems that the new GoPro Hero 3 Black upgrade did not contain a fix to the problem. Rumours are now that the adjustment of the exposure lock issue will happen with the next update. The fact that GoPro are aware of this issue and seemingly aiming to solve it, it is a fair assumption that it won't be long before they release a new upgrade that will take care of this. As for now though, there's a lot of frustrated skydivers who were hoping that this new update would solve some of their problems. While GoPro do not have the changelog available on their site yet for the new firmware update, the following changelog has been published elsewhere. HERO3: Black Edition Current firmware version: HD3.03.02.37 Wi-Fi version: 3.4.2.9 Release date: 04/03/2012 Feature Enhancements: FW version # is now visible on upon startup. Narrow FOV 1080p30/1080p60 (Protune) Narrow FOV 720p60 (Protune) Medium FOV 720p60 (Protune) Default start-up mode is now 960p48 At this point it seems to be a wait and see scenario with regards to the fixing of many of the Hero 3's bugs, but we have no doubts that GoPro are working hard to solve these issues and that sooner rather than later, we'll see these issues being addressed in coming updates. Do you own a GoPro Hero 3? Comment below and share your experience with using this camera.
  2. App stores are littered with an unprecedented number of apps, many of which are never downloaded, and for good reason. Skydiving apps, though, are few in number, with very few delivering quality content and tools for students and trained jumpers. Not anymore. Yesterday SKYPRO, the first real skydiving app, debuted on the Apple App Store for download. And it doesn't disappoint. The FREE download includes several features including a Basic Safety Requirements (BSR) brush up quiz/game, GPS/Map information for every USPA drop zone in the world with GPS functionality to get you there and back, Aerial views of every USPA drop zone, and critical documents to include the Free online version of the USPA SIM, and FAA regs. The app includes several features that can be accessed through in-app purchases, to include: 1. Interactive USPA (A-D) License Practice Exams with 1000's of exam questions, aimed to make you a better skydiver. Use these to gain an edge and stay safer in the air by sharpening your skydiving skills. 2. Plug & Go calculators. This is the ultimate skydiving tool for quickly calculating Wing Loading, Time of Descent, Canopy Drift, and Freefall Drift. The developers have announced that the Android version will soon follow this version. Exciting! Finally, an app worth using at the drop zone!
  3. DATE: May 23, 2013 SERVICE BULLETIN# SPSB009 SUBJECT: SUPPLIER/VENDOR RECALL OF PS70104 HOUSINGS (METAL FLEX HOSING INC) STATUS: MANDATORY INSPECTION AND REPLACEMENT OF RECALLED HOUSINGS SERVICE BULLETIN: MANDATORY INSPECTION (COMPLIANCE WITH METAL FLEX HOSING MATERIAL RECALL) IDENTIFICATION: ALL JA101 XX HARNESS CONTAINER ASSEMBLIES (JAVELIN ODYSSEY) WITH METAL FLEX HOUSING BATCH #33234 A AND 33227, .375ID PS70104 HOUSINGS. SEE SERIAL NUMBER LIST BELOW. 38159 38891 38901 38912 38959 38973 38987 38997 39027 39037 39047 39061 39165 38231 38892 38902 38913 38960 38975 38988 38999 39028 39038 39048 39063 39419 38453 38893 38903 38923 38961 38976 38989 39013 39029 39039 39049 39064 39499 38523 38894 38904 38924 38963 38978 38990 39014 39030 39040 39050 39066 39527 38589 38895 38905 38925 38964 38979 38991 39021 39031 39041 39051 39070 38753 38896 38906 38943 38967 38980 38992 39022 39032 39042 39054 39076 38799 38897 38907 38945 38968 38982 38993 39023 39033 39043 39055 39083 38800 38898 38908 38946 38970 38984 38994 39024 39034 39044 39056 39087 38860 38899 38909 38947 38971 38985 38995 39025 39035 39045 39058 39089 38890 38900 38910 38953 38972 38986 38996 39026 39036 39046 39060 39118 BACKGROUND: Metal Flex Hosing (supplier of flexible metal housings) has recalled 195 total PS70104 .375” ID SS housings due to the ability of the coil to separate. 155 of these housings were received by Sun Path Products, Inc., 124 of which were installed in harness container assemblies, 27 pulled from inventory prior to use and 4 damaged/discarded. (Note: this is not a failure mode. Separating of the coil does not impede normal operation or function of the system)  Who can inspect: Anyone can inspect this area. See photos below. What to inspect: All JA101 XX harness container systems listed in table above. Inspect Reserve Ripcord housing. PROCEDURE: If the serial number is listed in the above table, inspect the available exposed reserve ripcord housing. Locate the lower end of the housing, which is clamped to the Main Lift Web, just above the reserve ripcord pocket. Inspect the exposed length of housing from the clamp upwards; ensure that the coil has not separated/unraveled. Be sure to inspect the section that is routed through the chest strap. Inspection Results: A. HOUSING FOUND TO BE INTACT (GOOD): The rig may continue to be jumped with periodic monitoring until the next repack cycle or earlier elective replacement. However this housing must be replaced at the next repack cycle. See http://www.sunpath.com/support/HousingReplacement.pdf for instructions for your rigger to complete the replacement of the housing. B. HOUSING FOUND TO BE SEPERATED/UNRAVELLED (BAD): The housing must be replaced before the next jump by a certificated senior or master parachute rigger (or foreign equal) or the manufacturer. See http://www.sunpath.com/support/HousingReplacement.pdf for instructions for your rigger to complete the replacement of the housing or instructions to send your system back to the manufacturer. Resolution:A: Housing is intact and will be monitored and replaced at the inspection/repack cycle. 1. NOTE ON PACKING DATA CARD, SPSB009 COMPLETED 2. AT TIME OF REPLACEMENT, FILL OUT WEB FORM AND SUBMIT at http://www.sunpath.com/MetalFlexRecall.html and add “–Replaced“ after SPSB009 COMPLETED from step 1 above. 3. NO FURTHER ACTION REQUIRED B. HOUSINGS ARE SEPERATED/UNRAVELLED: 1. GO TO http://www.sunpath.com/support/HousingReplacement.pdf FOR FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS ON REPLACEMENT OF THE SUBJECT HOUSINGS. 2. AT TIME OF REPLACEMENT, FILL OUT WEB FORM AND SUBMIT at http://www.sunpath.com/MetalFlexRecall.html ;NOTE ON PACKING DATA CARD AND RIGGER LOG BOOK, SPSB009 COMPLETED REPLACED. 3. NO FURTHER ACTION REQUIRED. COMPLIANCE DATE: INSPECTION BEFORE NEXT JUMP (BY ANYONE) AND MANDITORY HOUSING REPLACEMENT AT NEXT REPACK CYCLE BY FAA SENIOR OR MASTER PARACHUTE RIGGER OR FOREIGN EQUAL. AUTHORITY: DAVID L. SINGER Sun Path Products, Inc. Director of Engineering 404 West Edinborough Ave Raeford NC 28376 USA Telephone: 910 875 9002 FAX: 910 875 9272 DISTRIBUTION: 1. All Sun Path Products Dealers 2. PIA Technical Committee 3. PIA Rigging Committee 4. National Aero Clubs, Parachuting Section 5. All Parachuting publications 6. Military Parachute Organizations 7. FAA MIDO SAVANNA 8. FAA FISDO, GREENSBORO, NC 9. FAA ACO, ATLANTA, GA 10. DGAC, FRANCE 
  4. SERVICE BULLETIN: #20132005 ISSUE DATE: May 20th 2013 SUBJECT: Retractable Y-Strap Modification (Part#043-001-005) to Tandem Student Harness (Model TV3-SH-Part#043-001-001) Download the full document with relevant instructions here: Sigma Bulletin #20132005COMPLIANCE: Mandatory IDENTIFICATION: 1. All Tandem Vector and Sigma Tandem Parachute Systems manufactured by The Uninsured Relative Workshop, Inc., on which a Tandem Student Harness manufactured by Uninsured United Parachute Technologies, LLC is used. 2. All Sigma Tandem Parachute Systems manufactured by Uninsured United Parachute Technologies, LLC. 3. All Tandem Student Harnesses which have the Model #TV3-SH printed on the orange warning label. APPLICABLE Harnesses that do have horizontal back and belt straps (Belly band) BACKGROUND: At Uninsured United Parachute Technologies, LLC. (UUPT), we are always striving to produce the best and safest Tandem system available. With regard to the student harness, the present design has been in use for over 13 years. Based on field experience, we know that, if it is fitted and adjusted correctly, it is highly unlikely that a student can fall out of the harness. However, we also know that this type of incident has happened once before with a Tandem Vector harness, and we have had two incidents where students came close to falling out. In each of these cases, it was determined that the harness was grossly misadjusted. But, no matter what the cause, this scenario is unacceptable. To further minimize the risk of such an event, UUPT has developed the “Retractable Y-Strap Retrofit”. This Y-Strap modification has been in use for several years with only a slight decrease in student comfort, in some cases. The Retractable Y-Strap was designed to allow the student to still lift their legs for landing. COMPLIANCE: UUPT now mandates the use of a Retractable Y-Strap Retrofit on all affected tandem student harnesses. Of course, both prior to and after the retrofit, it is imperative that each tandem instructor ensure that the tandem student harness and the instructor harness are properly adjusted, prior to each tandem jump, and that the proper adjustment is verified again just prior to exiting the aircraft. Retrofit and installation instructions are available upon request from UPT or can be downloaded from our web site at the following location: COMPLIANCE DATE: The modification must be completed no later than December 1st, 2013. After that date, no tandem student harness which does not have the Y-Strap Retrofit installed is approved for use on any jump. COMPLIANCE PROCEDURE: In an effort to reduce the financial impact on system owners, UUPT is selling the Y-Strap Retrofit components kit at its cost. The cost of a Y-Strap Retrofit components kit is $50.00 (Part#043-001-005). It can be installed by any certificated rigger with minimal effort. (Reference INSTRUCT-020-Student Harness Retractable Y Strap Installation attached) To order the Y-Strap Retrofit component kit, or if you have any questions, please contact Mike Maguire, at Uninsured United Parachute Technologies, LLC, 1645 Lexington Avenue, Deland Florida 32724, Telephone: 386-736-7589; Fax: 386-734-7537; Email: [email protected] AUTHORITY: Mark Procos, General Manager United Parachute Technologies LLC 1645 Lexington Avenue DeLand, FL 32724-2106 USA Telephone: +1 386 736 7589 FAX: +1 386 734 7537 DISTRIBUTION: - All identified owners of Tandem Vector and Sigma Tandem Equipment (to be notified by publication and through our dealers).
  5. Australia is getting a Wind Tunnel! Finally! With almost 40 Indoor Skydiving facilities around the world, for some reason it has taken several attempts over the last 10 years to build a state of the art tunnel in Australia. It came down to a group of courageous guys to spend the last 3 years finding a site, finding the right equipment, getting the best team together, and figuring out an innovative way of raising the funds (listing on the ASX) to make it all happen. Danny Hogan and Wayne Jones, both ex SASR servicemen, have done what many people thought was impossible. Indoor Skydive Australia Group (ISAG) successfully listed on the Australian Stock Exchange (IDZ) in January and started construction of a 16.4ft SkyVenture tunnel in February. One of the world’s largest and most technically advanced, the location is part of the Penrith Panthers facility, Western Sydney. It will operate under the global franchise brand of iFLY as iFly DownUnder, which brings unrivalled experience and technology from manufacturing 24 tunnels around the world. Launch is scheduled for first quarter 2014, You can keep track of the progress on Facebook/iflydownunder or by registering at iflyDownunder.com.au. What does this mean for Australian Skydiving?Australia – you go there to see kangaroos, koalas, crocodiles, pristine beaches or that big red rock in the middle of the dessert! It’s known for great walking, diving, surfing and now we can add flying to the list of tick boxes. The tunnel will revolutionize skydiving in Australia and turn novice skydivers into awesome skydivers. It will slow down the ‘attrition’ rate of skydivers leaving and introduce new people to the sport. It will become the catalyst for a sporting Evolution in Australia that has never been seen before. It will create an entirely new sport of BodyFlight in its own right and introduce skydiving to those who can’t yet fly - from 3 and up. In summary – it’s a good thing for skydivers, skydive operators and every Australian who has always wanted to fly. There are already some amazing Australian skydiving boogies on the map; The Equinox Boogie in Queensland attracts flyers from all over the world, some who come back year after year. Funny Farm is an invitational boogie in the outback which sees international coaches load organising some of Australia’s hottest flyers and the Full Moon Boogie in Victoria is now making a name for itself with Mike Carpenter (Volare) and Mike ‘Friday’ Friedman (Arizona Drive) organising at the event in recent years. In addition to the big name coaches, Australia truly does have some of the best scenery around. From unspoilt coastlines with clear blue oceans to forests, gorges and red earth. Combine these with the welcoming Aussie spirit and a wind tunnel and Australia is shaping up to be a great all round skydiving destination. So next time you plan a trip down under, make sure you bring your jumpsuit as well as your thongs! Many of the iFLY Downunder team are active skydivers and the centre will be built with skydivers in mind. There will be a skydiver’s lounge if you need to take a break and relax between sessions as well as the usual debriefing video stations and team rooms. Located in Penrith, a suburb in Western Sydney there’s plenty to do around the tunnel, whether you enjoy wakeboarding or white water rafting, need a hotel for the night, a good feed or a day relaxing in the nearby Blue Mountains national park. The team are striving to create a positive learning environment, where all abilities are welcome and where flyers come to meet like-minded skydivers. We also need to mention the level playing field that will be created when Australian teams can finally train in an Australian tunnel. The Australian VFS team ‘The Addicted’ completed 11 hours of intensive training with Steve and Sara Curtis (Arizonal Arsenal) and Mike ‘Friday’ Friedman (Arizona Drive) in order to learn the new open VFS dive pool. Team member Lucas Georgiou stated that “a tunnel camp was really the only way we could get up to date with the recent changes”. 8-way team ‘Velocita’ also trained in a 16ft tunnel before the Dubai Mondial, that’s 8 people who now won’t have to pay for expensive airfares abroad to team train. You can expect to see Australia raising its standard in prestigious skydiving competitions around the globe from 2014. It’s not just for the top teams that will raise their game using the tunnel. You only need to look at the numbers of new rookie teams taking part to see what influence the tunnel has. In the UK, which currently supports 3 wind tunnels and a fourth one on the way, the numbers of teams competing in the British Nationals has increased each year. 2012 saw a record 54 teams competing in the 4-way alone, bear in mind most of the skydiving season is spent waiting for the clouds to clear! iFLY Downunder will hold regular skydiver events, competitions and tunnel camps for everyone from new tunnel flyers to those wanting to work on VFS, 8-way or the new ‘Dynamic’ discipline emerging from Europe. Prices, operating hours and additional information will be released later this year. Anyone wishing to host a tunnel camp should contact [email protected] for more information and if you hold a current IBA tunnel instructors rating and are interested in moving to Australia please email your CV to [email protected] www.iFlyDownunder.com.au Construction Corner The Ground Breaking ceremony took place on 4rd March 2013. Raybal Constructions are working intimately with Indoor Skydive Australia Group and SkyVenture. Early bulk excavation completed and contiguous piling is now well underway with a total of 300 cubic metres of concrete to be poured. The facility footprint covers 655m² with an overall area of 2160m². Fabrication of SkyVenture components is now into its third month. For the latest progress follow us on Facebook/iFLYdownunder or register at iFlyDownunder.com.au
  6. Douglas Spotted Eagle caught up with Bill from Rigging Innovations during the 2013 PIA symposium and chatted a little bit about the new CPX accuracy rig. DSE: We're going to talk a little about one of the new accuracy rigs that Rigging Innovations has just come out with. So we're going to talk a bit with Bill. You are a world champion in style and accuracy and some 4-way and a few other things? Bill: A little 8-way when I was on the Knights and some accuracy. It was a long time ago, but I can still claim it I guess. DSE: A world champion is always a champion. Tell me a little about the new CPX rig? Bill: Yeah, the CPX is a new accuracy rig and unfortunately all the years of accuracy containers, you know they're a lot bigger - we've got bigger canopies. So normally you just sort of accepted that you would have a big, uncomfortable rig on your back. So what Sandy did, what Rigging Innovations did, was design something with the newest technology and the newest bells and whistles on an accuracy rig. I went to the world cup in Dubai a year ago and I said that just because you're jumping accuracy doesn't mean you need to wear an uncomfortable rig. It's hard, I don't know if you've ever gone to a world meeting and gone tent to tent, it's kind of hard. You go in there and you try to show your product, and at first I tried to talk to people - they don't want to listen to me. They're on a break, these accuracy jumpers want to take their naps; they're older like me. So Firefly said to shut my mouth and put the rig on them, so I put the rig on them and they'd call everybody over in the tent and they'd feel it, and it's a comfortable rig. And the things we've got on the rig, the bio-yoke is more effective than on the Curv because the size of the rig. When you put the big rig on it has even more feel than the smaller rig. It takes the rig and distributes the weight with the bio-yoke, so you have that heavier rig more comfortable, and it fits you. If you put it on, usually the bigger rig sloshes around but not this, we've even got people doing style with them because it stays so tight on the body. You've got the bio-yoke, the curve that fits the lower part of your back and then the rest of the things that we have on the newer rigs. There are grips on the handles so you get a good grip, even when wet. We've got non-slip on the stainless, as you know a lot of the rigs now days have a slippage problem. With the way Sandy has designed this, it doesn't slip at all, and accuracy jumpers usually want their rigs tight and not to slip, because everything we do in accuracy is related to your canopy and how it feels. If you get any bit of movement, it'll affect your competition. On the back we have some new things, the pilot chute has a little protector flap. When you're in smaller aeroplanes, you'll often find that it gets bumped around and slides out. All it is, is a small little flap that goes over the pilot chute and holds it in place and keeps it from coming out, so it's always in the same place and ready for you to pull. It's just a little thing, but it makes it awful nice. Next, on the backflap - again sometimes you get caught in a small plane, and I know that one time in the 70s I exited the aeroplane and went into a dive and my main opened, because I had bumped my flap and it had came up. Now this rig's backflap has magnets in so even if you knock it out, it'll go right back. Riggers will also appreciate that a lot of the time plastic breaks, but you can see that there is no plastic in here, which also helps aesthetically, as the rig is then flatter. Then there are some standard features, the tab if you want to have your collapsing pilot chute you can using the magnet. The suspension points for accuracy rigs are a little different to most other disciplines in that we don't want to be suspended back, but rather facing straight down. The designer has been doing these rigs for more than 20 years, so he has all the old technology but has also added the new technology to the CPX. DSE: I'm going to interrupt you for just a second there... One of the things we've noticed during these interviews over the years is that a lot of the audience are brand new skydivers who are trying to do that sponge thing, you know - soak it all up. Explain what accuracy is for the newer people. Bill: Good question. When I did started skydiving you did accuracy which still wasn't as popular as a style event, and then you had the long haired guys who were doing RW, we don't even call it RW anymore! So when we started accuracy, you're trying to land on a target. Now days we land on a tuffet, which was designed from the stuntment and stuntwomen who would need something soft and safe to land on. When I started jumping, the dead center measured 10cm and they measured out to 10 meters, now they measure electronically with the dead center being 2cm which is measured outwards to 16cm. You have shoes that are shaved down to a point so when you come down, you try and put your heel on that dead center and it's then electronically scored. You do 10 rounds of accuracy and then your total after those 10 rounds is how the winner is decided. DSE: And you're basically just doing those as hop and pops don't you? Bill: Yes sir, we get out at 2500 feet, open our parachute immediately and then setup your pattern. Most accuracy events now days are done as a team accuracy event which is usually done with 4 or 5 man teams. You get out at 3600 to 4000 feet and then set your stack out and land as a team, they will then take the score of the team and add them together for your score. DSE: I ask about the altitude because someone said earlier, "How do you get 10 jumps in when you go up to 13 000 feet". DSE: I interrupted you earlier, is there anything else on the rig you wanted to show us? Bill: Bill That's all the details about the new rig really. I guess you could say that we've taken an old uncomfortable rig and made a modern comfortable one instead.
  7. admin

    The Return of BIRDMAN

    The Birdman is flying again! This past week, BIRDMAN® International ltd jumped back to life with the addition of some new content, along with a new website design. The company, which halted sales on gear in 2010 due to a change in ownership structure - now has blood pumping through its veins again. The press release that was posted to the website highlights a number of details regarding the company; it's structure, ambitions and new direction are all addressed. This news has caught the attention of wingsuiters everywhere, many eagerly anticipating the new products that are set to emerge from the restructured Birdman company. Birdman's ReturnThe question on many lips surrounds what exactly went on during the past 30 months with regards to Birdman as a company. What structual changes were made, and where Birdman are headed from here. These are all questions that have addressed in the BIRDMAN® International ltd press release that they have posted on their site. One question that only time will be able to answer, is whether or not Birdman have what it takes to return to the market with the dominance they once held. Firstly, Risk Control Corp. will be the manufacturer and seller of BIRDMAN® International ltd suits under license worldwide from Japan. Risk Control Corp is run by Shin Ito, who is now seen as the strategic partner to BIRDMAN® International ltd. Shin Ito is a world renowned and record holding skydiver and specifically wingsuit flyer. Jari Kuosma, from BIRDMAN® International ltd states that Shin Ito has been the driving force behind the new birdman line as co-creator. Jari goes on further to say that while in the past BIRDMAN® International ltd had trouble in regards to the sewing of the suits, he now feels more comfortable in the manufacturing process - having professionals to work with, ensuring the best possible quality for the new Birdman suits. There is clearly a new focus on the Birdman products, and that focus seems to be quality. The company seems to have shifted away from the more economic suits and instead are focusing on supreme quality as opposed to an economic wingsuit option. The claims are that no corners were cut with the new line and that the aim was to create cutting edge suits that provide top quality. The paragraph closes with the wording "However, I dare to claim that the value of the new suits will be higher than the price tag. You'll see." The website indicates that the new line will come out with 3 new wingsuits. The Birdman Blade III has already been put live on the site, with detailed information publicly available, while the other two suits, the Samurai and the Ninja - are both yet 'to be announced soon' The Blade IIIA new wingsuit has also been made available by BIRDMAN® International ltd. The Blade III is said to be targeted towards experienced skydivers and will be the first product to be released having been created with the help of Shin Ito. An extract from the Birdman website says the following about the suit: "BLADE III is very powerful all-around wingsuit made for experienced wingsuit pilots who want to enjoy their flight from exit to landing. It is balanced perfectly giving pilot 100% control of pitch and speed. It’s drag-reducing quattro–wing platform has large, carved and specially shaped wings for best lift, agility and speed. This gentleman’s race craft comes all included; four wings, semi-rigid ribs & mini-ribs, pockets, inner lining, extra sturdy booties & 10 mm YKK zipper and over the shoulder zip for easy dossing. It will be offered in 5 color scenes." Birdman WatchesIt seems that wingsuits aren't the only products that BIRDMAN® International ltd are returning to the industry with. The company has also released information on a line of skydiving watches that they will be selling. The watches are supposedly designed with skydivers in mind and consists of a carbon fibre face, a case of aerospace grade 316-L stainless steel and 'virtually scratch-proof' sapphire crystal. The watches are said to be water resistant to 100 meters and the straps made from parachute nylon, so that you can be sure that they aren't going to snap under pull. The History of BirdmanBirdman started out making wingsuits in 1999, at a time when the wingsuit manufacturer market was extremely small - in fact, Birdman is generally recognized as one of the first wingsuit manufacturing companies. They released the BirdMan s.u.i.t in '99, as their first commercial wingsuit. The year after that they released both the BirdMan GTi and the Classic. In 2001 they continued the new lines with the BM SkyFlyer and the Classic II being released. A year later they expanded into tracking pants, releasing the Birdman Tracking Pantz. In 2003 the SkyFlyer and S.3 were released, followed up in 2004 by the Phi. 2005 saw the release of the quite popular Firebird and Firebird-R wingsuits. Between 2006 and 2009, Birdman released several more suits including both the Blade and the Blade II in 2007 and 2009 respectively.
  8. 8 February 2013 - Editors Note: After this article was published, TonySuit released a Service Bulletin regarding the Rebel and Apache Wingsuit that addresses the concerns raised below. If you use the Apache or Rebel for skydiving, TonySuits offers a free modification that will relocate your harness and emergency handles to the outside of the suit. See the image below. Download the full Service Bulletin. Wingsuiting is a new discipline that is ever-changing in terms of equipment, general DZ knowledge, and practices within the discipline. This can lead to a great deal of confusion about what is what, and how the equipment operates. One such example is the Apache series wingsuit, manufactured by Tonysuits Inc. This series of wingsuit is advertised as "for BASE jumping"and as the "biggest wingsuit in the world", the manufacturer "observed that placing the parachute harness inside the suit improved performance by reducing drag." This wingsuit places all components of the main lift web (MLW) inside the wingsuit, making the chest strap invisible, and leaving handles inaccessible unless modifications are made to the suit, parachute system/rig, or both. The manufacturer’s website also indicates: NOTE: This suit is for BASE jumping only. Having the harness inside the suit excludes it from being used for skydiving. Expert wingsuit skydivers could choose to modify the Apache to mount the emergency handles on to the suit itself under the guidance of a qualified rigger but TonySuits does NOT recommend any modifications! The process of jumping this system in the skydiving environment requires one of three actions; Rig Hidden In The WingsuitThe first option is to do nothing and jump the suit as it is with the rig entirely hidden within the wingsuit system as seen in this image below. Handles are entirely covered, and inaccessible without first unzipping the wingsuit. This is a legal means of jumping the wingsuit/rig system. Whether it is an ideal or safe method is determined by a pilot or S&TA.; The above method is not addressed in the FARs nor PIA Technical Documents. Various DPRE’s (Designated Parachute Rigger/Examiners) commented "No one at the PIA or FAA level ever anticipated we’d have jumpers covering handles with a jumpsuit; we now need to address this topic." Emergency procedures in this system: Unzip wingsuit. Crossdraw handles (Left hand to cutaway release, right hand to reserve ripcord). The "fully covered handles" method may be the only method not addressed in a FAR or PIA Technical Document, yet this method fails to take into account situations such as: Aircraft emergency requiring instant access to a reserve handle Missing hackey/handle, requiring a straight-to-reserve deployment Pilot Chute in Tow Hard pull Canopy collision requiring a cutaway High ground winds, where a cutaway is necessary Adding "Chicken Handles"Another method has been to put "chicken handles" on the wingsuit, essentially Rapide links attached to the cutaway release and reserve ripcord system. This changes the angle of cable travel (inducing a double 90 degree bend in the relevant cable) significantly increasing pull force. TSO (Technical Standards Order, administered by the FAA) requires that pull force be not greater than 22lbs of pull. In testing, the cutaway release required approx 45lbs of pull force, and the reserve system would not release with 60lbs of pull force applied (this was the limit of the scale used for the pull test. The "Chicken Handle" system was discussed with several rig manufacturers, Technical Chairs, former Technical Chairs, Rigging Chairs, and former Rigging Chairs of PIA. All agree this system is a violation of manufacturer TSO as expressed in FAR 65.111, and PIA TS 135 4.3.3 Table 2. In order to legally use this deployment system, the system must be tested and certified according to FAA TSO specification as set forth by the PIA. The definition of testing for certification requires: "4.3.3 HUMAN FACTORS AND ACTUATION FORCE TESTS: An anthropometrically diverse group of individuals (consisting of a representative group of no less than 3 males and 3 females) from the intended user group shall be employed for all human factors tests in 4.3.3. All individuals shall be able to operate the subject device without any undue difficulty. Table 2 lists the required test conditions and number of tests for each particular component. Additional information for the component tests is listed below. TESTS: Under normal design operating conditions, all devices tested under this paragraph shall result in a positive and quick operation of the device within the following load range applied to the handle: (a) a load applied at the handle of not less than 5 lbf (22.2 N), applied in the direction giving the lowest pull force, (b) a load applied at the handle of not more than 22 lbf (97.9 N), applied in the direction of normal design operation, (c) for chest type parachute assemblies, the maximum pull force shall be 15 lbf (66.7 N), (d) the primary actuation device shall be tested in accordance with Table 2, (e) the emergency/reserve drogue release (if used) shall be tested in accordance with Table 2." Table 2 includes standing, hanging in harness etc. The above system was never tested prior to being put into the marketplace. The challenges with this system were discovered in the field, as seen in the video link below. Pull tests were performed at various angles and configurations, with a Master Rigger in attendance. As of March 2012, the manufacturer has recommended that skydivers immediately discontinue use of this system. Moving Handles from the Rig to the WingsuitA third modification requires moving handles from the parachute rig system and relocating them to the wingsuit body via the use of Velcro. The rig is then connected to the wingsuit via ties/cords that are tied above and below the cheststrap/handles of the rig. Due to pull forces and the random/chaotic nature of a deployment, this system has suffered multiple two-out scenarios across the country. Multiple dropzones have banned this wingsuit system from being jumped from their aircraft. Tony Uragallo of TonySuits has responded to concerns, saying: "I am changing the Apache system to be similar to the Squirrel suit system." Squirrel suits have found a novel way of dealing with these risks by adding zippers that allows the rig to worn inside the suit (for BASE jumping) as well as outside the suit, with handles fully exposed. (for skydiving) The vast majority of skydivers often don't give much thought to TSO's or FARs, and most have likely have never heard of PIA TS 135. These are the "rules of the road" for parachute gear in the skydiving world. These rules regulations and laws are there to protect skydivers from unsafe practices equipment, to provide standards of performance, and the safe operation of a dropzone and to prevent problems within the skydiving and non-skydiving community through standardized rules, laws and industry practices. The FARs put aircraft pilots directly in the crosshairs when a problem occurs; this is why skydivers must demonstrate repacks when visiting a dropzone, for example. Should any incident occur, it falls on the pilot-in-command. Yet most aircraft pilots are unaware of what is or isn’t legal, as the dropzone assumes responsibility for equipment being legal and reserves in-date. In this instance, a wingsuit designed specifically for BASE being used in the skydiving environment and requiring modifications to a rig or the rig operation is a violation of TSO and by extension, the FARs. This creates a legal headache for dropzone operators, S&TA;’s, rig manufacturers, and other skydivers on the lookout for standard equipment. Wingsuits designed for BASE jumping are exciting, fun, and provide an added edge of adrenaline. Some skydivers may take the approach of "So what? It's an individual choice." Any reasonable jumper, base or skydiver, will conclude that skydiving is a different environment than BASE (which has no rules). In the skydiving environment, the manufacturers assure the FAA and the DZO that gear meets safety standards via the TSO certification. DZO's in turn, assure the pilot that equipment being used in the skydiving environment is legal, in-date, and approved. As skydivers, we assure each other's safety by using equipment that is legal, safe, and approved for the activity. If you are considering jumping any product that may involve relocating handles or other modifications, first contact the manufacturer of the harness to verify the legality of doing so - and check with your DZO or S&TA; for any local policy.
  9. admin

    Canopies for Kids

    Put simply, skydiving is the act of jumping out of a perfectly good airplane and performing aerial maneuvers in free fall before landing by parachute. However in the eyes of Canopies for Kids founders Matt Kuikman and Taryn McKay it was so much more than that. It was an opportunity to combine the sport they love with a cause that they were both passionate about. All they had to do was incorporate a few teddy bears. Matt and Taryn launched Canopies for Kids in the Spring of 2012 with the mission of providing skydivers with the opportunity to take stuffed teddy bears along for their skydive. Their organization uses this experience to position those bears as "The Bravest Stuffed Teddy Bears in the World" which are then given to sick children in hospitals. Their hope is that these special bears will help provide kids with the hope, support, and courage they need in their fight ahead and in their journey towards living a happy and healthy life. Participating in a Canopies for Kids jump is rather easy. You simply show up to one of their partnered drop zones and purchase a Canopies for Kids kit on top of your jump fee. Their kits are just $20 and include a Canopies for Kids teddy bear in a plastic bag flight suit and an envelope containing a card with a heartfelt message to the child in the hospital which each skydiver can sign and personalize. The costs of shipping and handling are also included, as well as a built in $5 donation to the Children’s Hospital. Recently they also added a Sponsor a Bear program in which individuals who don’t want to jump themselves can purchase a kit and donate the bear to go skydiving with another skydiver who is selected by the drop zone. After the bears have jumped they then make their journey to the local Children’s Hospital that the DZ is partnered with. Throughout the entire process the bears need to remain in their plastic bag flight suits. The reason for this is because some of the children these bears are intended for may have compromised immune systems; therefore it’s important that they remain as sanitary as possible. The hospital will then deliver the bears and their cards to the kids in a manner that they see fit. Canopies for Kids is presently located in Chicago, Illinois. In their first year of operation they partnered up with Skydive Midwest and the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital. They had over 70 bears jump with minimal marketing and exposure. As the 2012 season rounded out, Canopies for Kids began to gain increased publicity thanks to a documentary being done about them by an organization called Bus 52. That documentary can be found below on Youtube. Since the release of the documentary, the Canopies for Kids story has started to spread even further. Their founder Matt was recently interviewed on Skydive Radio and they are presently hoping to expand their operation to drop zones all over the United States. The organization is in the process of finalizing a partnership with a drop zone on the East Coast and will also have a presence at the upcoming 10th Annual St. Patrick’s Day Boogie in Fitzgerald, GA. They are even working with a few individuals to build affiliate operations in other countries. If you or your drop zone would like to learn more or get involved with Canopies for Kids you can visit them on the web at www.canopiesforkids.com. You can also find them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/canopiesforkids or follow them Twitter at www.twitter.com/canopiesforkids.
  10. Meso

    Top Skydiving Mobile Apps

    Skydiving Logbook (Android / iOS) Skydiving Logbook is an extremely popular application for both Android and iOS devices. The application allows users to log jumps with information such as jump #, aircraft, gear used, type of jump, delay, cutaways, notes and more. A unique feature is the ability to have licensed jumpers sign your logbook entries using the touchscreen. The application also caters for gear related information, allowing you to tie your gear item to their serial number and to set up service reminders on gear items. One is able to sort easily through the display of specific information that is recorded during your jumps, such as total jump counts, cutaways etc. You're able to manage your dropzones and aircraft, as well as setting a home dropzone. Another feature that's offered with this application is the ability to calculate and manage wing load information. The ability to import and export data from the application also means that you can perform frequent backups onto external devices. Overall, this application is packed full of features and it's clear that the developer has done something amazing with it, offering a great application to the skydiving community for free, in fact to quote their download page: "This application is free and always will be." Price: Free Ratings: 4.5/5 based off 123 votes on Android. 4.5/5 based off 6 votes on iOS. Download: Android: Skydiving Logbook iOS: Skydiving Logbook Skydiving Draw (Android) There are a few apps out there at the moment that cater to formation skydiving, Skydiving Draw is the more popular of the apps available. It allows you to manually create or to randomly generate formation sequences which are then presented in visual form though graphic images. The application provides you with the ability to copy and share your formation sequences, as well as the ability to export them as a PDF file, allowing for the easy print of such documentation onto paper, for training purposes. You are also able to save and load your sequences, this is something that while being worked on by other applications for future releases, wasn't yet available. Price: $3 Ratings: 5/5 based off 17 votes. Download: Skydiving Draw Canopy Calculator (Android) This app for Android devices is a small and basic application which calculates canopy size and wing load based off body and gear weight. Naturally with such a lightweight application there isn't really too much to say about it, but the app seems very stable on most Android devices and can come in as a useful tool, also at only 80kb in size and as a free download, there is really no reason not to have it. Price: Free Ratings: 5/5 based off 8 votes. Download: Canopy Calculator BASEline Flight Computer (Android) This application is more of an honorable mention, as the truth is, we really don't know just how well it works. On paper though, this looks to be a great application, if one has the correct mobile device that can support all of the functionality. BASEline Flight Computer is an application which is designed to improve flight performance, offering real-time feedback by both visual and audible means. The application claims that it uses the phone's sensors to determine things like altitude, glide ratio, tilt, speed etc. BASEline Flight Computer offers the user the ability to program your mobile device into an audible altimeter. Though naturally one should never rely on your mobile device to act as your altimeter. There is also a built in log book which has altimeter and gps recordings. IMPORTANT It is vitally important to note that this application should not at any stage be used as a primary means for altitude awareness, and to exercise extreme caution when using it in a skydiving or base jumping environment. The maker also strongly recommends that this device only be used with barometric altimeter sensors, which are only available on select few mobile devices. GPS data is not reliable for altitude readings, and even with barometric altimeter sensors, the readings may not be reliable. The developer ends the description with the line: "Software is provided "as is," with no warranty of any kind. Skydiving is dangerous, don't be stupid." This application has a lot to offer, as mentioned above. The real question is- How well does it work? Price: $6 Ratings: 4/5 Stars based off 1 vote. Download: Baseline Flight Computer Which skydiving apps have you got loaded onto your smart phone?
  11. The following is a copy of the latest Cypres 2 service bulletin, which can be found at: Cypres-USA. Issue date: 31 January 2013 Bulletin number: C2 0113 Identification: CYPRES 2 units manufactured February 2009 through December 2012 (02/2009 - 12/2012). Compliance: MANDATORY before each jump Background: Airtec GmbH & Co. KG has become aware of a small number of CYPRES 2 units becoming “non-responsive." Although the subject units indicated a “0” (or the selected DZ setting) on the display, they were no longer operating. Extensive research indicates that this situation is extremely rare and tends to occur during packing, especially on non-static-proof surfaces such as plastic, nylon or carpeted areas. Low humidity, build-up of static electricity and changing environmental conditions are all contributing factors. In addition, a recent activation, after the rig had been placed on the packing mat, has been linked to this phenomenon. Action to be taken: Prior to each jump, during your pre-boarding equipment check (after the CYPRES has been switched on), perform the following system test: Click the control unit push button one time, and watch for the red LED light to flash. A flash indicates that the unit is working properly. If the red LED does not flash, repeat this procedure to confirm. IF THE UNIT IS NOT RESPONDING, IT IS NOT IN A SAFE WORKING CONDITION, AND THE UNIT WILL NOT FUNCTION AS INTENDED ON A JUMP. If this is the case, contact Airtec GmbH & Co. KG or SSK Industries, Inc. for further instructions either to arrange for repair, or for a loaner or replacement CYPRES 2. If the unit is not in working condition, failure to perform this procedure prior to each jump will result in an increased risk to the user. Resolution: CYPRES 2 units manufactured after 1 January 2013 (01/01/2013) contain an update to prevent this situation from occurring. All existing CYPRES 2 units in the field manufactured during the affected date range (identified above) will receive the update as they cycle through their periodic maintenance requirement, or during other repairs. After a CYPRES 2 unit receives the update, the procedure described above (clicking the control unit push button during each preboarding equipment check) is no longer required. Additional Technical Details: The reason that only units manufactured during the above date range are affected is because the manufacturer of a component made a change on an internal ASIC microcircuit (which is something like a processor) to a higher level of integration. Prior to accepting the revised component, Airtec went through a 13-month evaluation period. This included laboratory testing as well as field-testing of 151 CYPRES units with no events or anomalies experienced. The revised component entered CYPRES production in February 2009. Authority: Helmut Cloth Airtec GmbH & Co. KG Safety Systems Mittelstrasse 69 33181 Bad Wünnenberg, Germany Tel: +49 2953-9899-0 Fax: +49 2953-1293 [email protected] Distribution: North America Market & Dealers North America Parachuting Publications Parachute Industry Association An FAQ relating to this service bulletin can be found on the Cypres Website.
  12. Base jumping is something that I’ve not had a desire to do, so it was understandable that when I was presented with the opportunity to read and review "The Great Book of Base" that I did so with some level of skepticism. You see, I've always had preconceived ideas about BASE jumpers, their discipline, and the personality types involved - ironic when you consider the very notion, a pet peeve of mine, general skydivers have regarding canopy piloting/swooping. "The Great Book of BASE" helped turn that thinking on its head. The Author, along with oftentimes anecdotal experiences with other BASE jumpers, paints a vivid yet methodical view of the world of BASE jumping. The book itself begins with a rather heavy handed push warning readers of the dangers of BASE jumping. Something, that while necessary, wears a little bit on the reader at times. It was the only part of the book I found a little difficult to get through - not because the warnings were invalid, or not to be heeded, but rather it felt like the Author was attempting to offset any potential future litigation. There is something about this book that should be clearly stated: This book will NOT teach you how to BASE jump, nor is it the intention of the Author for it to do so. What the book does do, and in my opinion does very well, is give the reader a solid sense of a path to follow in the BASE world. It's a guide and a reference book, something you read multiple times in your BASE career and refresh the things you need to. For newer (and perhaps even some seasoned jumpers) the book discusses the myriad of things a BASE jumper should consider from etiquette (site burning, etc), mentorship (something the Author is a avid believer in), various types of BASE jumps and locations, detailed explanations on various weather phenomena that can affect the outcome of the BASE jump, and even the types of skydives a future, or current, BASE jumper should spend time working on to give them the greatest chance of having a positive BASE experience. Also noteworthy is how the Author takes some time to dispel myths, largely prevalent in the regular skydiving community, about altitude BASE jumps. All the subjects mentioned above are discussed in depth, but not so much so that they become a chore to read. Quite the opposite in fact, and the Author does a spectacular job of keeping the reader engaged in the topic being discussed - not always an easy task when discussing technical topics. The book is well edited and written. The only real complaint I had about the layout, and it's a minor quibble, is that the Author refers to DBS (Deep Brake Setting) at one point, but doesn’t actually explain the acronym until a later chapter. As a non-BASE jumper, this term had me scratching my head until it was later explained. So what does this mean for you, the reader? Well while I still have the opinion that BASE jumping is not for me I have a newfound respect for participants in the sport. Additionally I can say that if I ever were to reconsider my BASE jumping career, I would certainly have this book on my bookshelf and use it for guidance on the next steps to take. I definitely will be recommending to some of the local BASE jumpers I know. Safe BASE jumps. Overall: Highly recommended
  13. CRESWELL, Ore—Eugene Skydivers owner and operator Urban Moore filed an FAA part 16 complaint against the City of Creswell and the Creswell Hobby Field in December 2011. The complaint was filed to restore landing rights for skydivers at the Creswell Airport. A ruling is expected to be announced no later than August 2012. The decision is expected to have national implications because it will set a precedent for cases involving airport access for skydiving activities on federally assisted airports. The part 16 complaint stems from a 2006 disagreement over landing rights for skydivers at the Creswell Airport. The dispute affects where skydivers land their parachutes and reduced Eugene Skydivers business operation to tandem skydiving only. An alternate landing site, located near Seavey Loop Road in Eugene, is currently being used until this issue is resolved. If the FAA affirms the rights of skydivers to land on the airport then full operations is expected to resume later this year. About Eugene Skydivers Eugene Skydivers drop zone opened for business in February 1992 at the Creswell Airport with only a single aircraft. Six years after opening, Eugene Skydivers built its operation to include three Cessna 182 airplanes. The drop zone has performed exhibition skydives for local businesses and charities. In 1998 a state skydiving record was hosted at the drop zone. Eugene Skydivers has performed an estimated 65,000 skydives over the past 20- years. This year alone over 400 tandem skydives have been safely conducted. The hours of operation are weekends and by appointment.
  14. According to his bio on the Avalore team page (www.avalorefreefly.com), Adam Mattacola, apparently began jumping in 2004 at my local drop zone, Sibson, near Peterborough in the UK when he was still in his teens. I don't remember him. Back then I had 200 jumps and thought I was the right royal shiznit. Who was I to look for the new AFF grads to jump with? Pshhh puh- LEASE! I was too busy making sweet 2 way head up jumps and trying my best to look like I knew what I was doing by colour coordinating my free fly suit colours I had on order. I had just got my C and was strapping a camera to my helmet. I was WAY too busy to deal with the likes of this young scrote! Fast forward a few years and an almost quick blink of the eyes later, and the same guy is hot off the presses, having just rolled off the newly awarded Euro 40 way HD record and the 11 way Brit HD record days before his 22nd birthday and he has also been garnered the austere title of UK Senior FF champs 2005 with his Avalore team mates. So is a record holder AND champion. All in the space of a few years since he first started. Accomplished at the sprightly age of 21, a full decade younger than me. "Hmmmmm", I pondered to myself this week, "how in the sweet name of Buddha, Allah, God, Jah and Jehovah did this guy get SO good SO quickly?!" Am I bitter? Of course not! That would be infantile. It's all love in this sport (especially when I might run into the young hotshot at some point and want some coaching off him!). Seriously though, Adam is obviously one of what I like to call the "new breed", one of the "rising stars" and all that other names that people call those very talented, young people who seem to progress so quickly in their given sporting discipline. I was curious to find out how he had managed to do it, in such a short space of time, and share his insights with the members of the skydiving community, old and young alike, so that we could possibly learn something from him, and shine some light on an obviously very talented flyer. So without further ado, I decided to find out just what the hell this guy had been up to to progress so quickly and do so well for himself in such a short space of time. Enjoy! Name: Adam Mattacola AKA Killa Cola Age: 23 Occupation: Airkix wind tunnel instructor/ Coach; AFF Instructor and Skydiving coach First skydive (date and location): Tandem skydive Sibson August 2004, AFF Seville August 2004 Years in sport: 3 Number of jumps: 517 Number of mals: 0 :-) Kit: Vortex2 Hurricane 120, PD120 with CYPRES Describe yourself in one sentence: determined, loves a challenge, loves to get laid and a little crazy. Background:I did a tandem jump in August 2004 at Sibson, I had always wanted to jump out of a plane since I was little....I've always been a little thrill seeker and who loves to do something new...in my head not many people have done skydiving and it scared the majority. I like to be different. After we'd jumped that was it, I was hooked - no fear in me at all and I had a big cheesy smile on my face which I could not wipe off for days. As soon as I landed I went to the internet and booked the AFF!!!! I knew this sport was for me. AFF in Seville 2 weeks later out of a small Cessna with instructors Alex and Jonno (thanks guys). Levels 1-5 I passed first time without a correction signal and with instructors letting go (no tunnel time at this stage). So that night I suppose you can say I got a bit ahead of myself and thought this was an easy ride and went and had a few beers. But stayed out late and only had a few hours kip like you do and went to the DZ knackered. Level 6.....spin flip twist spin spin flip twist all the way down. Hmmm shock to the system. Maybe this is not such an easy ride after all. Repeat Level 6 and yes it was a repeat - literally! ....spin flip twist spin spin spin. Instructor said go home have some rest and lets finish the course tomorrow. Went home had a kip then practiced on my bed all night. I soooo wanted this license. Then the next day I passed all levels and was one happy bunny. Jumped at Hinton. Got into freefly at around 50 - 60 jumps because it was something new and everyone said how hard it was.... I love a challenge, I love to learn something new and hard! I then went to Sibson and started to jump then had a Russia trip to Kolomna, it was great. 84 jumps in 2 weeks. Halfway into Russia I was still rusty in my sit and it took me along time to get to the base. As soon as I got there it was time for break off! Damn! Everyone started to mock me and I was like, "Come on... I only have 70 jumps!" So I decided "I WILL GET THERE BEFORE BREAK OFF!". So, out of the plane and zoom - but I didn't take into account stopping. Straight through the base. "Oops!". My nickname is "Cola" due to my last name and then they just added "Killa" as I tried to kill them all... hence "Killa Cola". A lot of the jumps were 2 way sit with Dylan and now I can freefly. (it's better to learn in smaller groups I think). After 200 jumps my buddy "Big Al" AKA Heman recommended me to Airkix to be an instructor. Thanks to him I got the job. I was an electrician before and was happy to leave. Weeks went on and everyone raved about how fast I picked up flying. I just thought they were being nice. A couple of months in and I was there flying around with the top flyers and then all of a sudden they were asking me how to do things. It was one big hit the first time it happened. The legends asking advice from me, all in just a few months! I competed in the World Challenge 2007 wind tunnel comp with Michi from Bedford. We came fourth, only 2 points behind Babylon, who were third. Avalore at this point, were looking for a third member as one had left. They asked me whilst at Airkix. I wanted to compete and get experience but had no money. Avalore has good sponsorship and let me trial for them at Lillo in Spain and they were happy with me. I am now a member of Avalore by spending next to no money - I'm very lucky. I then wanted to be able to teach anyone, so I did my AFF instructor course at Lillo so now I can teach from complete beginner to advanced headdown and can now pass on my knowledge. I heard about the Euro record and was desperate to take part. It represented something new and challenging and something not many people can say they have done. The biggest I did before that was 7 way head down. I went from the trial straight into a 20 way. Wow! I was buzzing. Got onto the 30 way record attempt out of 70ish people who turned up for the trials. Deep inside I was exploding with excitement but trying to stay cool about the whole thing. We completed it first time. Then it went to 36 people, then up to 40. Then as a fun jump/British record jump we did an 11way - 3 points. Now, when I get the chance, I will train with Avalore for the Nationals and hopefully we will do well. Alot of other good teams are out there. I now do coaching for all levels of skydiving too. A lot has happened to me in a short space of time - sometimes even now I have to step back and take a deep breath and make sure I'm not dreaming as all of this has happened in the space of working at Airkix within 1 year! What's a typical day like for you:Wake up to a cheesy tune as an alarm on my phone, so I can't help but smile even though I'm tired. Hot shower then turn it cold for a few seconds just before I get out. Wakes you up. Go to Airkix to work, give experience and enjoyment and share the sport I love with hundreds of people, and see them smile from ear to ear. Chill out when I get home, then do 'the thing I'm learning' at that particular time. I always like to be learning a new skill from learning a different language to playing piano or guitar or another sport. Then either go to bed or maybe go on my laptop and look at certain pages on the internet which I can't say about in this interview and...well...you know the rest! Who do you look up to in the skydiving world and why:I look up to every high achieving competitor as it takes a lot of commitment, hard work and motivation to be in a team. I also respect a lot of students due to there determination by not quitting when they come to a move they struggle to do. Best jump you have ever had and why:I think maybe the pants jump I did in Russia. Seven of us in just our boxers and all not really very experienced. It was basically naked bodies flying all over the place out of control with the great expressions on their faces - so much fun but we froze our bollocks off! Favourite type of jump right now and why:Has to be a chasing dive with buddies, without trying to lose one another. It's true free flying as you fly at all angles and positions like eagles, carving tracking and belly/ back flying (which I feel are also important areas to be good at) and quick directional changes. Tracking also has to be one of my favourites as I can't do it in the tunnel, and there is so much to do in tracking, so many angles and different speeds. How have you managed to progress so quickly in such a short space of time?Tunnel time for sure is the quickest way to learn skydiving skills. It disciplines you to do everything on spot with a coach right in front of you and if you hit that wall, you don't want do it again so you make yourself do it right! I always pushed myself and never let something beat me because it was too hard to do. I believed in myself and after I flew I watched back over my flights and made sure I understood how the wind works with your body instead of just flying and being able to do it without actually understanding WHY. That's the way to do it, making sure you understand why things happen. Being relaxed is a also a big part of flying, so if possible you need to be sure you're not sexually frustrated. Trust me it affects your flying! Favourite coach you have had coaching from and why?The Airkix tunnel instructors.... a friendly, helpful bunch who have time for their students and they are very good at what they do. What makes a skydiver experienced?Attitude to the sport, safety wise, is very important and that's for both while under canopy as well as in freefall. Also, not knowing HOW to do something but more importantly, WHY it happens - that's the way to learn. If you understand "the why", it is better then doing it a million times and not understanding it. Some people with a couple of hundred jumps have better knowledge of the sport than some guys with a 1000 jumps. What would you change in the sport if you could change any one thing?Make it cheaper and be able to jump from a higher altitude. Where do you see yourself in 10 years?I really don't know...I can see myself still in this sport for sure, but I think mainly just coaching and passing on knowledge I have gathered over the years. I tend not to plan the future - I'm more of a guy who goes with the flow and whatever is around the corner, I've just got to make the most of it. You only live once!!! Greatest non skydiving accomplishment:4th in the Bedford World Challenge, but if you count that as skydiving related then most probably being in a dance video doing breakdancing. Favourite quote:Make it happen and live your dream - life is only as good as you make it. Freefall or canopy ride?Freefall - you share the experience with alot more people while it's happening. Swoop, or straight in?Swoop - it's challenging and it's something new to learn, but it's also very dangerous if you underestimate it. Jump numbers or experience?Experience - if you have the knowledge and understand it, its better than a bit of paper saying I've done 2000 jumps. RSL or no RSL?No RSL - could be a situation where it would not be best if reserve come out straight away. AAD or no AAD?AAD for sure just make sure it's the right one for what you are doing....if you swoop - make sure you have a swoop CYPRES. Fun jump or training:Fun jump - no pressure and makes it easier to enjoy every moment of the skydive Noddy or Big Ears:Noddy Steak or Tofu:Steak... rare The journey or the destination:The journey - the destination may not turn out to be as good as you thought, but getting there is one big adventure and you have no idea how its going to work out. Sex or jumping:Got to be sex, as it is free......well for most people anyway...sex while jumping would be interesting! Money or fame:Money. Fame could lead to no privacy. Money will take a lot of worries away. Many thanks to Adam for taking the time out to answer these interview questions!
  15. An employment opportunity has opened up at Skydive Arizona, one of America's leading drop zones. Located in Eloy, Arizona - the drop zone has spent the past 26 years establishing itself as one of the popular drop zones in the United States and are well known for their events, which includes the infamous Holiday Boogie. Skydive Arizona is a well respected and thriving business with a great environment and group of staff, as I'm sure anyone who has jumped there already knows. Their current arsenal of jumpships include 4 Super Otters, 4 Super Skyvans and a DC-3. The facilities at the drop zone are top class offering gear rentals, rigging services, team rooms, restaurant, bar, bunkhouse, pool, camping and much more. If you have experience in graphic design and marketing and are preferably a skydiver, don't miss out on this amazing opportunity. The specifications of the job are listed below. Marketing/Events/Graphics Designer PositionSkydive Arizona is looking for a self motivated, enthusiastic individual with marketing and graphic design experience. Ideal candidate would also have a skydiving background. Below is a list of the most common duties associated with this position. Conception and implementation of all Advertising, Marketing and Promotions. Monthly Parachutist ads Other ad designs upon request (newspaper, billboards, brochures, etc.) Plan, organize, coordinate and promote all Boogies, DZ Events, Competitions, etc. Maintain Websites & Facebook Periodic articles in Parachutist for boogies/events that occur at our DZ. Obtain Sponsorship for things Nationals and our bigger Events & Boogies. Booths & Promos at different venues. Planning & organizing of Staff Events Periodic smaller customer events like contests, pool parties, Karaoke, DJ, etc Constant Contact emails T shirt and poster design Monthly Staff & Customer Newsletters Salary is DOE Skydive Arizona is a drug free work place.If interested please email your resume to [email protected] or fax it to 520-466-4973.
  16. All eyes were fixed on Roswell, New Mexico on Sunday, where skydiver and BASE jumper Felix Baumgartner took part in one of the largest skydiving record attempts in history. The mission, named 'Red Bull Stratos' saw Baumgartner raised to heights in excess of 120 000 feet via the use of a helium inflated balloon which was towing a 1400kg capsule. The mission, which was originally announced in 2010 had seen its fair share of ups and downs, the initial launch schedule was for 9 October 2012, but due to weather and communication issues it was postponed until the 11th of October. Things didn't go as planned on the 11th either, when despite ideal ground level winds, the winds between 700 and 800 feet were gusting too strong for a launch, which resulted in the helium balloon being blown over during the inflation process. The event was then rescheduled for 14 October, where a window in the weather conditions were seen, and the team of Red Bull Stratos were remaining positive for a launch. Baumgartner has been a controversial figure in BASE jumping, where he has been accused of going against the general BASE ethics involved, and seeking media attention as opposed to keeping objects off the presses. During the morning hours conditions were marginal, with the 700 ft winds remaining the area of concern. The mission was put on hold once again for several hours, but winds co-operated and at 15:25 GMT and the broadcast began to stream live. The team looked to take advantage of the weather conditions and aimed for a quick launch, which occurred successfully shortly after the broadcast began. As the balloon and capsule ascended some concern was raised when it approached the 30 000 ft mark, when Felix was being taken further east than expected due to the winds at higher altitude, though these concerns were alleviated somewhat later on after he had passed the jet stream and winds began to swing back towards the west as he ascended. Some Quirks on the Way Up Further concern were raised as he passed the 100 000 ft mark, when the visor of his helmet was having issues in regulating temperature. This caused enough concern for the team to consider alternative options with regards to the mission, with the option of Baumgartner descending with the capsule as opposed to performing the jump, not sure whether jumping with the error would cause a significant safety hazard. The decision was that due to the possible hard landing that could be experienced in the capsule, despite the capsule being lead down by a parachute, the best option would be for the jump to progress as planned. On the ascent, the landmark numbers were that of Joe's 1960 record jump as well as the record for the highest ever manned balloon flight. At the height of 112 000 ft, the Redbull Stratos youtube channel was reporting over 4 500 000 users live streaming the video, with the event going viral over social networks. The capsule began to slow down in ascent speed at around 123,000 ft as expected, but soon the ascent speed began to rise rapidly, going to a speed of 10 meters per second. This was cause for some concern and the balloon had to be vented, as Felix approached a height of 128,000 ft, 8000 ft higher than the desired exit altitude. The balloon then slowed down in the range of 127 500 ft and the checks began. Col. Joe Kittinger at Ground Control At the request of Felix, Joe Kittinger would be handling all the ground control communication with Felix during the mission. Joe, now 84 years of age was a career military officer and a former Colonel in the United States Air Force. Prior to this mission Kittinger held the world records for the highest skydive, fastest and the longest skydive. In the year 1960 Kittinger performed a skydive from the height of 102 000 ft, an amazing accomplishment, especially for the time. This record held strong for over 50 years, until Sunday 14 October 2012. Kittinger's flight was not without it's own set of hiccups too, during his record setting skydive, a tear in his glove caused his hand to swell up to twice the size, due to the amount of pressure at those heights. The checks began as the balloon's ascent slowed down considerably and by the 21st check, Felix began to depressurize the cabin to 40 000 ft and confirm a suit inflation, this check was successful and moved them onto the next item, which was depressurizing the capsule to ambient pressure at a height of 128 000 feet. The world at this stage was hanging on the edge of their seats, as Felix depressurized further and the balloon began to descend. At 127 500 ft the door was opened and Felix began to move towards the front of the capsule, the earth's curve clearly visible on the cameras. The balloon ascended again a bit to a height of 128 000 ft, when his chute was confirmed as okay to jump... Then after a couple more checks - he was off! Controlling the Spin The exit was un-dramatic, flat and stable, exactly as planned. With so little air up there any instability on exit could lead to an uncontrollable spin or tumbling descent. After reaching speeds beyond 690mph Felix suddenly started spinning and you could almost hear the world hold its collective breath until he brought it under control what felt like too many seconds later. Maximum speeds quickly reached over 720mph, but were also quick to decelerate as the air thickened. During the freefall stage Baumgartner went on the radio saying that his visor was starting to fog up, but this was shortly before he had to open his chute, was ended up not being an issue. Felix Baumgartner had hoped to reach super sonic speeds, to gain the record for the longest freefall time and to break the speed of sound. Unfortunately for Felix, his freefall time did not exceed that of Kittinger's, but he now holds the confirmed record for the highest ever skydive, and while not yet official, his top speeds are also estimated to have set records. Given Kittinger's large role in this mission, one may say that it is only fair that his record remains at least partially intact. The day was without a doubt one of excitement, expectation, success, but also quite possibly disappointment for some. There is no arguing that this was by far the most watched live skydiving event in history, drawing more than 7,000,000 viewers from around the world live to YouTube alone, while millions more watched the event live on television. Our congratulations go out to Felix Baumgartner on his accomplishment, as well as to Kittinger for his work at ground control, not to mention all those involved with the Red Bull Stratos mission in one way or another. Update: The post-jump press conference has released the official record statistics from the jump. Felix jumped from a height of 128 100 feet and had an official freefall time of 4 minutes and 20 seconds. The real surprise was the official records for the maximum velocity achieved, while original estimates were indicating that Felix reached a maximum velocity of 729 mph, this ended up being very conservative with the official finding concluding that in fact, his maximum velocity was an outstanding 833.9 mph, or 373 m/s, meaning that Baumgartner reached Mach 1.24 during his jump. This means that Felix has become the first human to go supersonic during freefall.
  17. Just a mere few weeks after GoPro released the new HD Hero 3, another popular POV camera manufacturer has too released a new product. Drift, which has had quite successful sales with their previous model have announced the release of the "Drift HD Ghost", a new and more powerful product when compared to their award winning and commercially popular model, simply named the "Drift HD". It is clear from the start that Drift were putting their focus on the features with the HD Ghost, being quick to highlight their new two-way LED remote control. The selling point for Drift, when it comes to the Ghost HD, is the concept that while many other POV cameras come with accessories included, that these other products will often require a number of aftermarket accessories to achieve the results desired by the consumer. Drift say that the HD Ghost will include 'everything sports enthusiasts need to capture professional quality video immediately". The above mentioned LED remote controller is one that is designed to allow the user to understand what current settings his HD Ghost is set to. Where most remote controls work one way, sending information to the camera, but not receiving it, this two way remote controller system is something that is new to the POV camera market, the question as to whether this will be a feature that will be adopted by other manufacturers in future or whether it will be seen primarily as a gimmick is yet to be seen, but if the system works in practice as it does in theory - it will certainly allow for a much easier and comfortable mode switching experience when one is using the remote to control the camera functionality. There is a 'Drift Flashback (TM)' function on the HD Ghost which will record video in a loop, and only save the file when the user 'tags' it. This can come in useful in situations where you're looking for 'that' shot and are expecting a number of failed attempts before catching it. I'm sure many of all are all too familiar with running out of recording space just when you need it, a curse that seems to extend to still photography too. The Ghost HD comes with a 2-inch LCD screen which allows for video playback and editing. The LCD is also covered in Gorilla Glass(R) which prevents scratching and keeps the camera rugged. A 7 element lens design is said to help increase the vibrancy and clarity of the HD Ghost as opposed to previous models, and brings better image quality to the 1080p, 960p, 720p and WVGA recording modes. The camera is also able to shoot stills while recording video footage. Stills are able to be captured in three different formats: 5, 8 or 11 megapixels. Or 2 megapixels when taking a still shot while recording. Also of interest is the ability for the Ghost to switch between 170°, 127° and 90° field of view. The device comes with wi-fi connectivity and soon Drift are said to be releasing an iOS and Android mobile app which will allow Ghost HD owners to control their camera's recording, settings and playback directly from their mobile devices. This is seem as a way of making it even easier for users to record footage and share it with social networks. In essence, one could record a video, transfer to their smart phone and then upload directly to social networks within mere minutes of the recording. The Drift Ghost HD is made with 3 meter water proofing when used without a case, this means that general water sports with the exception of things like scuba diving, don't have to invest in an extra housing case, though there is the option for deep water protection by purchasing one of Drift's special underwater housings, which are water proof until 60 meters. Drift claims to boast the longest lasting battery for any POV camera currently on the market, with 3 hours of recording time, using a 1700 mAh lithium-ion battery. The current retail price on the Drift HD Ghost puts it in the same market as the GoPro HD Hero 3, meaning that Drift see the HD Ghost as a serious contender in the action camera market. And from early reviews it seems that the Ghost is able to capture some quality footage, whether that footage is as good as the Sony AS15 or the GoPro HD Hero 3 is yet to be seen. But we do think that the Drift HD Ghost is a big step up from their previous Drift HD, which didn't perform too well compared to some of the competition in our action camera comparative review.
  18. This past week saw the opening of the voting process for the 2013-2015 USPA Board of Directors. Voting shall continue through the months of November and December with the closing date for submissions being the 31st of December 2012. The voting, which is open to all USPA members will result in the selection of representatives who will handle the direction and policies of the USPA until the end of 2015. The USPA allows for voting to take place either through written submission or through electronic voting. The voting form can be found in the November issue of Parachutist magazine, as well as online in a .pdf format. For those new to the process of the USPA election, the USPA's board consists of 22 members, with 8 national directors and 14 regional directors. These members are elected by the entire USPA membership and members from the regions where the directors reside, respectively. There is not a difference in the authority held by either a regional or a national director. National Director NomineesMembers are able to vote for up to eight national director nominees. One is able to vote for any of the names that appear on the official ballot, or to write in the name of a candidate or multiple candidates that do not appear on the ballot. The eight nominees with the highest amount of votes will be elected as the 2013-2015 national directors. Regional Director NomineesMembers are able to vote for one regional director nominee. The candidate must reside in the same region as the voting member, as per the address on the members USPA file. In cases where a region may have either no candidates or a single candidate running, members are able to cast a write-in vote for any member that is a resident of the member's reigion. Download USPA ballot form (Right click and 'save as' to save to your computer) Paper Ballot VotingThe USPA has advized that members who wish to cast their votes via the method of paper ballots must do so either by using the voting form that is included in the November issue of Parachutist magazine, or by downloading and printing the voting form from the USPA website. As per the USPA, "Ballots containing more than eight national director votes, or more than one regional director vote will be disqualified." It is important to note that the forms which have been downloaded for paper ballot voting must be completed in the handwriting of the USPA member and digitally marked or signed submissions will not be accepted, further more these cannot be faxed or e-mailed. Electronic VotingUSPA members received an e-mail from VoteNet which provided instructions and the means to cast an electronic vote. There were a number of cases where members failed to receive the e-mail, for those people who failed to receive the e-mail in question, the USPA advises that you either contact the membership department and verify your membership details and e-mail address, or that you resort to using the paper ballot method listed above. You are able to contact the membership department either by telephone at (540) 604-9740 or via e-mail at [email protected] Members are allowed one vote, either by electronic voting or via paper ballot, if more than one vote from a single member is received it will be the first received ballot that is counted, while any others will be discarded. The first board meeting of 2013 will occur on the 22nd to the 24th of March in Daytona Beach, Florida and will see the new directors for the 2013-2015 term seated, the meeting will also see in the election of the new USPA officers. You are able to partake in or follow discussions regarding the 2013-2015 USPA election process via the forums.
  19. Vancouver, Canada – 18th October, 2012 – Recon Instruments, award winning innovator of Heads-up Display (HUD) technology for action sports, is excited to announce the limited release of an innovative HUD designed specifically for precision human flight. Flight HUD is available to pre-order from Recon Labs. Recon’s HUDs have already revolutionized the way wingsuit pilots Jeb Corliss and supermodel-adventurer Roberta Mancino fly by delivering flight-critical data, direct-to-eye. Via the suite of onboard sensors the HUD, originally designed for snow sports, has been customized to display glide ratio, speed and altitude via a micro LCD screen sitting unobtrusively inside the pilot’s goggle. To guarantee production, Recon Instruments has set a requirement of 250 pre-orders of the bespoke HUD, available on Recon’s special projects website, Recon Labs. The website has been launched especially for such projects, allowing Recon to respond to demand for special case HUDs from different sports communities. Click here to hear what Jeb Corliss has to say about how Flight HUD has made him a better pilot. Tom Fowler, Chief Marketing Officer of Recon Instruments added, “We are inundated with requests from athletes and participants from a wide variety of sports to create bespoke HUDs for their specific use. Flight HUD is Recon’s first special project whereby a certain number of pre-orders will unlock a special production. We are really excited to be able to offer human flight athletes the same information traditional pilots have been using for decades and know this breakthrough will re-define their flying experience.” Flight HUD is available from labs.reconinstruments.com for $299USD for the first 250 pre-orders and $349USD thereafter. Price includes Recon Ready goggles.
  20. Among the discussions currently taking place in Washington, D.C., about reducing the deficit and finding new revenue streams is talk about imposing new user fees on general aviation. There has been similar talk in the past, but Congress squashed the idea. There’s not yet any formal proposal, but there are enough rumors from official sources that many of the general aviation associations representing pilots and businesses that operate aircraft have asked their members to contact their Senators and Member of Congress to oppose the idea. General aviation users already contribute to the aviation trust fund by paying a federal tax on every gallon of fuel purchased, and general aviation users want to stay with that method. The basic idea of a user fee is to charge aircraft operators a set fee per flight. The charge could be anywhere from $25 to $100, and it could be assessed per takeoff or per radio contact with air traffic control (ATC). Skydiving operators—with multiple takeoffs each day and a requirement to contact ATC on each flight—would pay more than most operators; the cost of jump tickets would go up. A new fee could be aimed at jets only, or it could be aimed at all turbine aircraft, or all aircraft in commercial operation, or simply all aircraft. Regardless, if enacted, it is a sure bet that the fee would eventually increase and also be expanded to other users in the future. Adding insult to injury is that the FAA would have to create a sub-agency to track billing and enforce payment. USPA joins our general aviation brethren in fighting the user fee concept. Please take action now to ensure that Congress rejects the user fee idea. On the Senate website, select your state from a dropdown menu in the upper right corner to be directed to your two Senators’ contact information. On the House of Representatives website, enter your zip code to be directed to your one Representative’s contact information. A phone call is best, followed by an email, and even a fax; mailed letters take too long to arrive. In your contact, identify yourself as an aviation user, and explain how increased costs would affect your participation in skydiving—an FAA aeronautical activity. Ask them to reject the idea of new user fees for general aviation and to continue the collection of federal taxes on aviation fuels. The above article was taken from a USPS news release: www.uspa.org
  21. admin

    GoPro HD Hero 3 Announced

    GoPro have just unveiled the specifications for their new generation of mounted sports cameras. The GoPro Hero 3 will likely grab an even tighter hold of the already dominated market, where GoPro have found themselves leading over the past few years. Other companies have tried to revitalize their products in order to keep up with the ever popular GoPros, but ultimately have not yet managed to capture the power, functionality and quality that GoPro manage to pack into their cameras. The HD Hero 3 looks to focus on creating a smaller and lighter camera, while at the same time increasing the features and enhancing both video and photo quality. It's difficult not to be impressed by the Hero 3 by looking at what it provides, at least on paper. The Hero 3 range is said to be at least 30 percent smaller than the HD Hero 2, and 25 percent lighter. They have also included built in wifi, which while of limited use to some, is a huge positive advancement for many others. The processor of the camera is claimed to be twice as fast as it's predecessor, this makes the camera able to handle higher quality video at higher frame rates. The higher end of the Hero 3 range allows for 4k resolution video at 15 FPS, while supporting 60fps at 1080p, 100fps at 960p and 120fps at 720p. This is a vast improvement from the Hero 2 which recorded at a maximum of 48fps at 960p and 30fps at 1080p. This information would support the claim that the Hero 3 can in fact double the performance of it's predecessor, the HD Hero 2. The design of the GoPro Hero 3 is similar to that of the Hero 2, though slightly slimmer. It's good to see GoPro sticking to a design that has proven to be successful, while only making minor cosmetic changes, most of which are due to design enhancements, one of which is a new, flatter lens. There are currently 3 models in the range, the entry level model which is referred to as the 'White Edition', the intermediate model which is called the 'Silver Edition', and then the top of the market model which has all the bells and whistles - the 'Black Edition'. Another impressive feature is the ability to control up to 50 cameras from a distance of up to 600ft using a remote. This remote is included in the Black Edition, while can be purchased separately for the other Hero 3 models for around $80. Due to the fact that the Hero 3 has only been announced hours ago, there aren't really any performance tests out yet and will likely come in at a later stage, though the claims are that the Hero 3 (Black Edition) is twice as sharp, twice as powerful as before when under low light conditions and all models also have received a reduction in the wide angel distortion. The photographic specifications on the GoPro HD Hero 3 are slightly enhanced from the Hero 2, in specific models. The entry level model, as with the Hero 2, comes with a 5 megapixel sensor, while the intermediate model has been bumped up from an 8 megapixel to an 11 megapixel sensor, while finally - the top of the line model has been bumped up from an 11 megapixel sensor to 12 megapixels. All three models have the ability for burst shots, with the White Edition offering a maximum of 3 shots per second, the Silver Edition providing up to 10 shots per second with its burst mode feature, while the Black Edition takes the cake with an amazing 30 shots per second burst firing option. GoPro HD Hero 3 - Specifications GoPro HD Hero 3 (White Edition) Specs Included Built in Wifi 1080p/30fps, 960p/30fps, 720p/60fps 5MP photos Up to 3 shots per second burst mode Improved Housing $199 MSRP HERO3: White Edition Camera 197’/ 60m Waterproof Housing* Rechargeable Li-ion Battery QR Buckle 1 Curved Adhesive Mount 1 Flat Adhesive Mount Assorted Mounts and Hardware USB Charging Cable GoPro HD Hero 3 (Silver Edition) Specs Included Built in Wifi 1080p/30fps, 960p/48fps, 720p/60fps 11MP photos Up to 10 shots per second burst mode Protune & White Balance Improved Housing $299 MSRP HERO3: Silver Edition Camera 197’/ 60m Waterproof Housing* Rechargeable Li-ion Battery QR Buckle J-Hook Buckle 3-Way Pivot 1 Curved Adhesive Mount 1 Flat Adhesive Mount Assorted Mounts and Hardware USB Charging Cable GoPro HD Hero 3 (Black Edition) Specs Included Built in Wifi 4k/15fps, 2.7k/30fps, 1440p/48fps, 1080p/60fps, 960p/100fps, 720p/120fps Remote Control 12MP photos Up to 30 shots per second burst mode Protune, Continuous Photo, White Balance and Picture in Video Improved Housing $399 MSRP GoPro App Compatible Pro Low-Light Performance HERO3: Black Edition Camera 197’/ 60m Waterproof Housing* Wi-Fi Remote + Key Ring Remote Charging Cable Rechargeable Li-ion Battery QR Buckle J-Hook Buckle 3-Way Pivot 1 Curved Adhesive Mount 1 Flat Adhesive Mount Assorted Mounts and Hardware USB Charging Cable The waterproof housing for the Hero 3 has been developed to be smaller and fit close to the new flatter lens. Lens distortion under water is often a factor in wide angle underwater photography or filming, and it may have been one of the driving forces behind the decision to adopt a flatter lens in their design. The storage and ports have changed slightly since the previous releases and now contains a mini-USB for syncing and charging, while having micro HDMI for video output. The Hero 3 will use a micro SD card, as opposed to the regular SD cards used in previous versions. The big question for many GoPro owners is going to be whether it is worth them upgrading their current setup for the new Hero 3. For the most part the White and Silver editions are along the same lines as the Hero 2, the Silver Edition just having a few new tweaks and enhancements, which may be enough for some to consider the upgrade. But from what we've seen on paper, the Hero 3 Black Edition looks to be a different beast and we have high expectations for the results of any tests that are going to be performed with this camera in the near future.
  22. DSE

    The AFF Two-Step

    Receiving an AFF Instructor rating is one of the pinnacle points of a skydiver’s continuing education and experience in the sport skydiving world, and has been a personal goal of mine for approximately two years. I was sure that the moment I had six hours of freefall time and my C license, I'd be able to knock this thing out fast. How wrong I was... This badge is likely the most expensive badge in the skydiving world When I first began skydiving, I was presented with the opportunity to spend some time in the tunnel at Perris, CA, with Ed Dickenson and Jay Stokes. I immediately took Ed up on his very generous offer to help me in my progression towards being a camera flyer. At 27 jumps, I entered the tunnel to learn some of the techniques I’d later use to fly with tandems, four-way, and fun jumpers. The video is hilarious.While I waited for Ed, we hung out at the school in Perris, and I overheard many conversations taking place between students and instructors. It was at that point I decided to become an instructor. Jay Stokes, Ed Dickenson, and Jack Guthrie all encouraged me to look towards that goal, yet six hours of freefall and a C license seemed so far away at that point, it quickly fell off the radar. I was having a hard time waiting for my 200th jump just so I could put on a camera anyway, let alone being an instructor.When I hit 200 jumps, I immediately got my coach rating. Alright! I was prepared to be unleashed on unsuspecting just-off-AFF-students.My first coach jump went great and filled me with a confidence that I had never before experienced. My third coach jump didn’t go so well with me finding myself very low, opening at an altitude that got me grounded for the weekend. Little lessons seemed to constantly present themselves. Although most of my wingsuit coach jumps have gone well, I once took a student with only 160 jumps. Bad decision; he had a cutaway (on a rig he'd borrowed from me) and I'm grateful that's all that occurred. I grounded myself for the weekend, and learned that lesson the hard way.It seems like most of us have stories like that; this one was my moment of enlightenment. Over the next two years opportunity to teach, be taught, sit in on teaching experiences, and grow within the sport continually presented themselves. Like many skydivers, I surely thought I “had it all” in the 500 jump range when in truth, I was merely beginning to understand how much more there was to learn. As one skydiver repeated over and over (and over), “You don’t know what you don’t know.” Well…he’s right. I was discovering how little I knew, how far I had to go, and I was finding myself on the road of discovery.Being part of the qualification process for the 71 Way Wingsuit World Record opened my eyes to what good wingsuit instruction could be. I gained information over the last year that is integral to the first flight process as well, taking instruction from Scott Campos, Scott Callantine, Sean Horton, Justin Shorb, Jeff Nebelkopf, Scotty Burns, and several other very experienced wingsuit coaches. Like most skydivers, I've experienced great coaching and not-so-great coaching in my skydiving progression. Being present when a friend was part of a tragic incident at the start of the year convinced me that I needed to know more about instruction, and I began looking at available AFF course opportunities. At the PIA conference, USPA President Jay Stokes informed me that Certification Unlimited (Jay’s instructional entity) was putting up a Coach and AFF course at Skydive Arizona in the following weeks. Timing was going to be tough, as I had some minor surgery scheduled, but I was excited to take advantage of the closeness of the opportunity, at one of my favorite dropzones, and in warm weather while it was freezing back home. Image Left to Right: Alex Chrouch, Jay Stokes, Craig Girard, Kelly Wolf, Nikos, Eliana Rodrigues, Douglas Spotted Eagle Arriving in Eloy on a Saturday, I was completely pumped to start my education then and there. After all, I have 1300 jumps, 19 hours of freefall time in a couple of years, so this was going to be a fun cakewalk, right? I mean, I’ve got more than three times the requisite hours, lots of experience teaching, how hard could it really be? I’d taught parts of many First Jump Courses, taught many wingsuit students, and sat in on several courses. I knew I was ready. How incorrect my thought process would prove to be. Jay began with the syllabus and schedule for the course. It was daunting, but still appeared to be not insurmountable. We did a bit of class work that night but the real class began in earnest Sunday morning at 8:00 a.m. with the dew wet on the grass, sunrise barely behind us, and no coffee in sight, Jay smacked the class between the eyes with a number of videos that showed why the AFF program is so important, why the training would be very precise, and why each jump would be rated with “Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory” with no grey areas. “I’d bust my own mother if she wasn’t doing it right” is something we’d occasionally hear. And I believe it, but wasn’t intimidated by the concept. In fact, the only thing that had me intimidated was learning that repeat World Champions Craig Girard and Eliana Rodriguez were in my class. It’s somewhat difficult for a Hyundai to shine when parked between two Ferrari’s, right? I knew I’d nail this stuff in a heartbeat. The written test was a cakewalk, just missing one question. And that question used math. To say “I suck at math” would be akin to suggesting that “Omar is an OK skydiver.”I use a calculator for two plus two. True story. The ground training process is specific, but I’m used to this stuff, it’s pretty basic if you have the program down (thanks TDog, for providing some good pointers).Passing the written test indeed was a cakewalk compared to what came next... the in-air practicals. Game-on, kids….We were assured the first jump would be our one opportunity to experience a “good student practice jump” where the student would behave and do essentially everything instructed, exactly as instructed.True to his word, Jay jumped like a perfect student. I was on the main side, Alex on reserve side.The jump went well from the Otter; no exit problems, the student responded perfectly to my signals, even if I was a little amped and anxious on this first jump. I thought Alex and I were a solid team. Suffice it to say that Alex did an outstanding job of flying his slot, keeping eye contact with his partner (me) and of doing his part in keeping our “student” corralled.Next jump, Jay paired me and a different partner with Kelly, a newly-minted AFF Instructor Evaluator.She went out the door with legs both bent forward at unique angles, arms in every direction but straight forward, and the only guarantee we had was that she wouldn’t roll onto her back during this practice jump. Manhandling her into a level position without punching her required a great deal of strength. My partner lost his grip, floated up, and next thing I knew, I was alone with my student. I wasn’t going to let her go, except I was required to. And did so.She flew away, turning like a propeller just starting up and gathering speed as she backslid, turned, and orbited. I knew I had fewer than 15 seconds to catch her (which sounds like an eternity, but in truth, it’s the blink of an eye for the second jump as an AFFI Candidate). I caught up and had her blocked in a few short moments, but those same moments seemed like an eternity in themselves. She grinned and decided to go the other way. I think what troubled me wasn’t that the grin was mischievious; it was evil, clearly payback for what she had been subjected to as an AFF candidate. Cruel, cold, calculated evil. But we were having fun, right? My partner was floaty, at least 20’ up and 20’ out from where our student was spinning, but he did eventually make it most of the way back in. I ended up on the reserve side after her spins and subsequent blocks, and so the dance at the bottom was a little different; it was my first experience with dancing on the left. I pulled the handle, deploying my student and she looked at me with a grin that made the previous evil smile appear to be innocent; I’d failed to ride through the actual deployment. The triumph I’d felt at properly feeling the rhythm and cadence of the dance evaporated like palm sweat in a 120 mph wind. Moving on before I exaggerate more than I already am….let’s look at the third jump of the afternoon. It was beautiful. Stunning. The sort of sun and sky that Eloy is famous for, and it was about to be spoiled. This time, I had no partner and no one on whom to place blame for the carnage that was about to occur. Combat Wingsuiting, combat RW could not have prepared me for a single, main side exit in which my student extended arms straight forward, legs nearly as much so, almost as if she’d been laid over top of a fence to dry, face down. I muscled her so that she remained belly to earth and she obviously didn’t like that action very much. She immediately pretzeled her legs with the right leg looking like it was flying over a hurdle in a heat, and the other leg bent 45 degrees forward and bent again at the knee. It was like she was performing a classic freestyle position but on her belly instead of her toes pointing straight down. Arms were practically folded above her head, and it was all I could do to force an arch. Duh…throw a hand signal and there might not be quite so much force necessary…. Thumb down, she arched like a pro. “Today’s skydive is brought to you by the letter ‘U’” as she arched so hard that she plummeted. Thank heaven I hadn’t asked her to wear the lead. I don’t like lead much, and my fall rate range is pretty broad. All those tandems and AFF videos have helped. OK, she’s settled out. Calm, flying great, she gets a thumbs up and a terror-laced grin from her instructor. I give her signals to do a practice pull and toe taps. She does great and so therefore has earned a release. I released and she backslid from the moment I let go of her harness. Damn, that girl is fast, but so am I. I chased her with a side-slide, threw her a legs-out signal. Wow….look at her move forward! Faster than she was going backwards. Now, I’m orbiting and don’t even realize it until I’m looking at her butt in my windshield. So…forward I go, and out goes the hand signal for arch; I was behind her. She didn’t have a rear-view mirror so my only option was to slide sideways, slide my left hand under the BOC as I started to slide past, and toss her another “arch” symbol. Whew! She settled out….Mr Toad couldn’t have had more of his way with me than Kelly did on that skydive. And that was just the first day…. Variations on the theme make for a colorful tale; the ground experiences as we prepped to get into the aircraft were equally interesting but it would spoil the movie if I share too many of the instructor’s tricks as they acted the part of wayward students. Suffice it to say that they’re there to help you succeed, but also there to allow you to fail if you’re not on your toes and looking out for the best interests of the student at all times. The dives aren’t about you, they’re about being sure your student is getting the appropriate attentions and instruction at all times. I won’t bore you with further details of the skydives because they’re all about the same sort of story; carnage, deceit, evil appropriations of an examiner that demands you be able to drive forward in a sideslide while dropping like a stone to do an assisted rollover as they’re spinning with a maniacal grin, laughing at the poor sap chasing them. It’s like “Hare and Hound” with Dr. Dimento as the wily rabbit, always one step ahead. Just as you catch up, they cooperate. In the moment you breathe a sigh of relief, they’re on to the next trick. Carly Simon going through my head with “Anticipation…” Lest you think I exaggerate too much, grab any AFF instructor who has had Jay’s program or anyone who Jay has taught. They’ll tell you I’m not kidding and if truth be told, I’m underselling the experience. Lemme share a small story; If you deploy your instructor/student “for real” by pulling their hackey, it’s an automatic Unsatisfactory and regardless of whether you did everything previous right or not, you weren’t successful on this skydive due to that one fairly significant factor. “Students” wear a simulated hackey that AFF candidates are required to pull at a specific point in the skydive. AFF Candidates will hold the simulated hackey handle til they meet up with the instructor on the ground.Jay didn’t care for the fact that I kept stuffing the hackey handle down my pants when it came time for my own deployment. On my last skydive, we’re standing in the door of the aircraft and my ‘student’ is going through “check out” and in his up/down/arch mode when I realize there is no simulated hackey visible on his main-side lateral.I’m screwed. I absolutely must deploy my student at the bottom of the skydive. I must pull the simulated hackey and show the instructor that I pulled and that I rode through the deployment. That small handle is the proof in the putting that I did exactly as I was trained to do. In other words, those handles are important. What to do, what to do? Worry hammered me throughout this skydive, my last in the series of eval dives. With a “Satisfactory” I’ll be able to catch my flight scheduled to leave Sky Harbor in about two hours. If I get an “Unsatisfactory,” I’m not going home and believe me, the price for that would be very high. I have commitments outside of skydiving, y’know? The point of do or die is one that lasts for about three seconds or 500 feet. I make my decision and dammit, I’m sticking to it. Maybe. I reach for my student’s leg gripper, look at my altimeter and begin the process. I’m counting down. By now, the “dance” is so freakin’ ingrained in my head that I’m doing it in my sleep, so much so that I’m convinced I did it perfectly on this skydive even though video shows I didn’t. Reaching over to where the simulated hackey was supposed to be, I spied it turned behind the lateral. Gave it a yank at the last possible moment, and proudly raised the simulated hackey as I ducked my head beneath his deployment hand (the last thing you want to experience is a bridle wrapping around your neck, or having the deploying hand knock you in the side of the head; it might be construed as interfering with the student). And rode out his deployment. The last thing I remember seeing as my instructor lifted above my head was his look of wide eyes, pointed finger, open mouth, and the smile on his face. We got to the ground, I watched my student land, and debriefed the skydive.Mirth in my instructor’s eyes, he says “Nice job. Now tell me what you didn't like about that skydive."A grin crossed his face told me he was well aware of the location of the simulated hackey. And, I knew I’d passed the program at that point.A wave of relief passed over me and I felt like falling to my knees and crying myself dehydrated, but I doubt any moisture would have come forward. I’d forgotten to rehydrate in my excitement of this last day. I was drained. I was pwn’d. I was reduced to jelly and tissue in this last moment. No way, no how would I have signed up for this experience had I really known what was in store for me, of this I was sure. All week. But… At the end of the week’s worth of mental, physical, and emotional torture, after hearing Lou Gossett in my subconscious screaming “I WANT YOUR D.O.R.!!!,” I’m a better skydiver. I’m a better person, and I’m a more informed instructor. I now know a little more about what I don’t know. As I said before, I'm now firmly on the road to discovery. "SATISFACTORY" or "UNSATISFACTORY", anyone who endures the process will come out a better person on the other side of the hellfire. I promise. I now have a new respect for those that have undergone this process before me. I understand why they are looked to with a unique sense of appreciation at every dropzone, I understand that the program is as much or more about teaching the next step in the educational process of qualified skydivers as it is about providing a license to teach the uninitiated. The AFF rating is a license to teach but it’s more a license to learn. In roughly 18 skydives, I learned a lot about what students can and will do. I learned how to best manage those situations with my new found abilities, and learned that if in 18 controlled scenarios I could learn this much, how much can I learn in a year, two years, five years of teaching a variety of students? I’m excited at the prospect. Respect and appreciation is due where it’s due, and I’ll take the opportunity to point out that as skydivers, we all have foundations made up of the bricks of those around us. Jack Guthrie, Jay Stokes, Ed Dickenson, Norman Kent, Mike McGowan, Debbie Z, Lance B, Kelly W, Joey, Chris, Phil, Blake, Craig, Eliana, Alex (I’ll jump with you any day, kid), Nikos, Jeff, Justin, Scotty, Scott, Chuck, friends on dropzone.com…and so many others are the bricks that have helped pave the road on which I have driven as a skydiver seeking more knowledge. I don’t know how to thank you all for the inspiration beyond paying it forward and being the best instructor I can be as you have been great instructors in my life. OK, enough lovefest. Thank you. It's the little things that make the difference on a skydive whether for the better or worse. Taking instructon from Norman Kent's camera course that taught me to anticipate movement, taking instruction from Ed in the tunnel that helped me develop a very high range of fall rate for a heavy person, and being part of numerous FJC and FFC courses helped me develop a comfortable ground patter and rhythm. All the pre-AFF prep you can do, I recommend you take the time to do it. You'll be glad you did. Whether you went through AFF, Static Line, IAD, take a moment to thank your instructors; they worked hard to get to where they are, to be at a point where they can intelligently and safely teach others, including yourself. It’s a big, dangerous world out there and instructors walked just a few feet ahead of you, checking to make sure it’s the best environment within which we all learn. Buy em’ a beer, give em a smile, even if it’s been a long time passed by. Receiving my rating from Jay Stokes, Certification Unlimited (and current President/USPA) In the event you’re wondering by now, students are a little less safe; I squeezed through my AFFI course. It’s an expensive patch and logbook endorsement, but one I urge towards anyone with an inkling to teach. I wouldn’t trade the experience for the world. Blue skies and puffies.... ~dse
  23. This week Contour launched their new Contour+2. Like its predecessors the Contour+2 is a light-weight versatile full HD action camera. Contour took a look at their previous models and combined the best features from the ContourROAM and the Contour+ into the new easy to use Countour+2. By sticking the existing form factor they made sure the camera is still small and light, two of the most important requirements for any mounted action cam. The Contour+2 weighs only 0.2oz more than its immediate predecessor. What's in the box? Contour+2 Camera Micro SD Card (4GB)* Profile Mount Rotating Flat Surface Mount Rechargeable Battery USB 2.0 Cable Mini HDMI Cable Mic Cable Waterproof Case Specs: Full HD – 1920 x 1080 @ 30/25fps Tall HD – 1280 x 960 @ 30/25fps Action HD – 1280 x 720 @ 60/50 or 30/25fps Slow Motion – 854 x 480 @ 120/100, 60/50, or 30/25fps Photo Mode: Every 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, or 60 seconds 5MP Sensor Codec – H.264/AAC / File Type – MP4 AAC Audio Compression 32GB microSD Compatible Battery Life: 2-2.5 hrs While most of the improvements are to the video itself, there are some external changes that, on the face of it makes real sense and will probably make this an even more desirable little camera to have. Contour brought back the built-in tripod (1/4" - 20) mount, something that got lost between the ContourROAM and the original Contour+ that just didn't make sense. There’s also an Instant-on record switch and no more power button. Slide the slider forward and you’re ready to jump. There's a slide lock to prevent you from having a dreaded premature recording stop. The Contour+2 records full HD (1080p) at 30FPS video and SD (480p) video at 120FPS. However, it now also embeds “rich data” like speed, elevation and distance via a built-in GPS receiver as part of the recording. All of this can be edited and fused via their Storyteller app (PC/Mac). So, much easier to track and share your most excellent wingsuit jump. Other cool features include: a 270° rotating lens which allows you to mount this camera in almost any position you can imagine and the built-in leveling laser will help you get frame and get the picture right regardless. An external mic port, a 4GB microSD card and a mini HDMI cable for live streaming all included. Also part of the package is a 60-meter waterproof case and then of course the one we like, improved Bluetooth connectivity, turning your iOS or Android smartphone into and external remote viewfinder. Another great thing, at $399.99, you get all of this at about 100 dollars cheaper than the old Contour+! We hope to have a full review of the Contour+2 in the very near future for you. In the meantime, find out more about this camera on the Contour Website.
  24. Fredericksburg, VA... Pat Moorehead, 80, of Long Beach, CA, will be awarded with the National Skydiving Museum's Trustees Award during the museum's fundraising weekend celebration at Skydive Arizona, Eloy, November 10, 2012. The award is being given to recognize Moorehead's TEAM 80 event where he made 80 skydives to celebrate his 80th birthday. The event raised more than $18,000 toward the museum's building fund. On November 20, 2011, to celebrate his 80th birthday, Moorehead jumped out of a plane at Skydive Elsinore -- 80 times. Despite cloudy skies and rain, he set the world's record for the most skydives by an 80-year-old in one day. Moorehead actually made 81 jumps; after he broke the record, he went up one last time to fly the American flag. The feat took a little over 6 ½ hours and was supported by more than 50 volunteers including Moorehead's wife Alicia, riggers, cameramen, a pilot, and a doctor on standby. Moorehead also managed to get the necessary equipment and an airplane on loan for the event. The jumps began around 6 a.m. and concluded shortly after 12:30 p.m. right before the skies opened and the rain began. Friends and admirers from around the world sent in contributions to the National Skydiving Museum to honor Pat. His original goal was $8,000….the final total was more than $18,000. The Trustees Award is a newly created award that will be given at the discretion of the museum's Board of Trustees for significant contributions to the museum and its mission. Moorehead will be presented the award by the president of the museum's Board of Trustees L. Len Potts at its prestigious Hall of Fame Dinner Saturday, November 10. The gala will be held at Skydive Arizona. Tickets to the Dinner are still available. The dinner is part of a weekend fundraising celebration with activities starting Friday morning (November 9)that include exhibit displays with some of the rich history of the sport, a theater featuring great skydiving footage, and a special display on the history of the Star Crest Recipient Awards (SCR). A video of Moorehead's jumps will be continuously played along with a banner signed by all who donated to his efforts. Throughout the weekend, a group of large-formation skydivers will be building 64-way formations to commemorate the birth of relative work. On Friday evening, there will be a BBQ with some of the sports' living legends sharing stories from the past. The culmination of the weekend is the Hall of Fame dinner presented by the Parachute Industry Association when seven skydiving legends will join 17 others into the museum's Hall of Fame. More than 300 people from around the world are expected to join in the festivities and the event is expected to bring in more than $125,000 to support building the museum. The fundraiser will benefit the National Skydiving Museum's $6-million capital program that will raise the necessary funds to build the museum in Fredericksburg, VA. The National Skydiving Museum is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation governed by a Board of Trustees. For more information and to register for the National Skydiving Museum Weekend and Hall of Fame celebration, visit www.skydivingmuseum.org or contact museum administrator, Nancy Kemble, at 540-604-9745 or [email protected]
  25. Estimated to cost USD 1.3 Billion for a month, the billboard features a Jet Pack Man flying around the billboard in a seconds-long promotion for Skydive Dubai and Go Fast Skydive Dubai, the world's premiere skydiving center, in association with Go Fast, a global energy brand, showcased the world's most expensive billboard located in Downtown Dubai, yesterday, at 6pm. In what is deemed to be the most expensive billboard, Skydive Dubai and Go Fast have utilized a Jet Pack to create the interactive billboard. The billboard involves a man with a Jet Pack, initially hidden within the billboard, to emerge from the billboard and fly around it for approximately 20-30 seconds, before landing back on the billboard. If the Jet Pack act for the billboard were to continue for a month, it would cost approximately USD 1.3 Billion. www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ptr5gyLwq8 The billboard is strategically positioned at the entrance of the stunning Burj Khalifa, the world's tallest building. Located in one of the most premier destinations in the world, Downtown Dubai, billed as 'The Centre of Now,' the Go Fast billboard by Skydive Dubai has created a new landmark for Dubai. Commenting on the Skydive Dubai's association with Go Fast for the billboard, Mr. Nasser Al Neyadi, Chairman of Skydive Dubai, said: "This is an epic moment, and we are very proud to be part of it. This initiative is another example showcasing Dubai as a world leader in innovation and technology. The billboard came into being with a simple idea that has transformed into an exceptional event to attract a global audience. Our gratitude to our partners, Go Fast and Emaar Properties, without whose support, this would not have been possible." "Skydive Dubai would like to acknowledge that the creation of such a monumental dropzone would not be possible without the support and extraordinary vision of His Highness Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum, Chairman of the Dubai Executive Council and President of the Dubai Sports Council." Skydive Dubai is supported by Emaar Properties PJSC, the global property developer of iconic projects, and the provider of premier lifestyles. Emaar has been shaping landscapes and lives in the Emirate since its inception in 1997, creating value-added, master-planned communities that meet the full spectrum of lifestyle needs. Downtown Dubai is the flagship mega-development of Emaar, and features iconic developments including Burj Khalifa, The Dubai Mall and The Dubai Fountain, in addition to homes, commercial offices and leisure attractions. Mr. Troy Widgery, CEO of Go Fast, commented on the event, saying, "We are very happy to be in Dubai. During our first visit two years ago, the city left us mesmerized. Its people and the culture here is amazing. We were immediately convinced to bring Go Fast to the UAE and have introduced the Go Fast Halal Energy Formula, the first of its kind in the world, developed especially for this region. We are certain that the brand will be received very well here. We are grateful for the support of Skydive Dubai for our venture in this part of the world. With this billboard, we want the people to know that we will be here soon." The seconds of flight time for the billboard in Downtown Dubai would cost a minimum of USD 500 per second. If the number of seconds in a month (60 seconds x 60 minutes x 24hours x 30 days = 2,592,000 seconds) is multiplied by USD 500, the total amounts to approximately USD 1.3 Billion for the month long fly time for the billboard. Skydive Dubai is an all-turbine drop zone, offering safe, professional and fun skydiving experience over the breathtaking Dubai skylines. Skydive Dubai caters to skydivers of all experience levels from the first time tandem jumpers to fun jumpers and experienced skydivers. Go Fast is an independent, authentic, lifestyle brand. Based out of Denver, Colorado, Go Fast was established in 1996 to support the lifestyle of extreme sports enthusiasts. The world-recognized brand is known for the Go Fast Energy Drinks, Go Fast Energy Gum, Go Fast Gear, & and everything that Goes Fast! For Further information, please contact: Mr. Firas Al Jabi Skydive Dubai Tel: + 971-50-348-8802 Email: [email protected]