Bob_Church

Members
  • Content

    1,887
  • Joined

  • Last visited

    Never
  • Feedback

    0%

Everything posted by Bob_Church

  1. Bob_Church

    Packing Nightmare

    The only difference in the way I pack is that I push the air down out of the canopy rather than up into it. I'm surprised that anyone who isn't jumping F-111 still does it the other way. Wouldn't this essentially destroy all of the flakes? No. You flake out the canopy and lay it down. Then you tuck the sides in until it's the shape of a cigar. Then, as I was taught, you put your knees on the base of this tube and use your arms to squeegee the air to the top. That's the normal way, or at least the way I was taught and how I see others packing. But for ZP pushing the air up doesn't make sense. I kneel on the top of the canopy, and squeeze the air down towards the other end where it's open. Once I've worked my way down to their I block it with my knee to keep the canopy from reinflating and S fold it. Your weight keeps any of the canopy from moving in exactly the same way as when you push the air upwards. Once you've formed the canopy into a cigar shape how do you get the air out of it?
  2. Bob_Church

    Packing Nightmare

    The only difference in the way I pack is that I push the air down out of the canopy rather than up into it. I'm surprised that anyone who isn't jumping F-111 still does it the other way.
  3. Bob_Church

    Packing Nightmare

    Great advice to give a newbie Bob, working on your fatality count? Does this make any sense to anybody? Is it pushing the air down and out of the canopy, or not using vinyl that you consider lethal?
  4. Bob_Church

    Packing Nightmare

    I'd always knelt at the base of the canopy, where the slider ends up, and squeezed the air upwards. With ZP I know kneel on the top of the canopy and push the air downwards, then pin the bottom of it and start S folding. And I never try to pack on surfaces like vinyl flooring. The 'teeth' of carpet or grass help keep the canopy under control and cuts down on the S folded canopy's habit of spreading out sideways.
  5. Bob_Church

    a question about old cutaway systems

    Actually what we said was that the T-Rex couldn't wipe its ass with those wimpy arms. This is the real reason they died out. Typing is just a matter of leaning forward far enough.
  6. Bob_Church

    a question about old cutaway systems

    "I don't miss my risers falling down my shoulders because of poor riser keepers, or keeping my chest strap really tight because the shoulders were both wide and floppy, of having my main container cover come open most jumps, etc. I don't miss the plastic ripcord handle, and while it was convenient to stuff my pilot chute into the hollow made by the laterals, it really wasn't all that secure... " And feeling like you've been in a car wreck after three jumps because of the harness.
  7. Bob_Church

    a question about old cutaway systems

    Not Marty Feldman. Monty Python sketch. Four Yorkshiremen. You'll find it on You Tube. You can both be right. I believe Marty Feldman has done a version or 2 of the sketch, included along with the Python troupe. My memory says it may have been live performances. It's a floor wax AND a sleeveless gown.
  8. Bob_Church

    a question about old cutaway systems

    Not Marty Feldman. Monty Python sketch. Four Yorkshiremen. You'll find it on You Tube. I hadn't seen the Python version, but I saw Feldman do it twice, once on his TV show. Thanks for the link, I'll try a comparison. In Feldman's last version, last that I saw anyway, they were sitting around in a cafe.
  9. Bob_Church

    a question about old cutaway systems

    "I would (and have) jumped any of that gear again. But I think my newer rigs are generally better. Wendy P. " I was just doing my Marty Feldman routine. Edit: I was trying to find it on youtube, or more accurately one of them. If I remember correctly he had a series of similar skits but the one I remember had him and a couple of other ancient Vets sitting around a table talking about how many times each of them had been killed in the war and the different horrific ways they died then would end with "but you try to tell kids today and will they listen? Nooooo!"
  10. Bob_Church

    a question about old cutaway systems

    Edit to add: Some pictures here. https://www.flickr.com/...s/72157622676844920/ You can see the R3s with the clear plastic tube. The R2 pictures are just before the R3s. Young jumpers probably think the rigs in those photos were old but it's not true. That's how our gear came, straight from the manufacturer, and we liked it that way! It built character unlike these Ken and Barbie rigs today that don't even have enough velcro. We had more fatalities during packing than bounces. But you try to tell young people about how it was and they act like you're talking crazy.
  11. Bob_Church

    a question about old cutaway systems

    I'm trying to remember wooden toggles. I think mine were cloth but I might be misremembering. Or could those have been R2s? Is this the Rodriguez of Spanish Fly fame? No wooden parts on the R2s, they were all velcro and nylon. That was one on the differences between the R2s and the R3s that had a small piece of clear nylon tube to give you something to pull on. The R2s just had nylon to pull on. I recall the tabs were made from sewn tubular nylon so you had something to grab but the R3s with the tubes were an improvement. The only wooden toggles I ever had were on round canopy steering lines
  12. Bob_Church

    a question about old cutaway systems

    I'm trying to remember wooden toggles. I think mine were cloth but I might be misremembering. Or could those have been R2s? Is this the Rodriguez of Spanish Fly fame?
  13. Bob_Church

    a question about old cutaway systems

    I'm trying to remember if I had R2s or R3s and if the both exist and if so what's the difference. This isn't a faded memory thing, I never managed to find out at the time.
  14. Bob_Church

    EPs: Look up before pulling reserve?

    That could explain one of my cutaways. I was going over on my back and compromised. I kept holding the reserve handle with my right hand as I went on over and stabled out. I had plenty of altitude but if I lost it I didn't want to have to look for a handle, just pull. But I had definitely been looking up at the piece of trash that should have been a parafoil as I chopped.
  15. Bob_Church

    EPs: Look up before pulling reserve?

    My biggest, of many, problems with an RSL is that there's no place to put it if you're on a jump where you need to disconnect it. If there were a small loop or something to allow you to safely stow it it would make it a little less out of the question for me.
  16. On my computer the subject line is truncated to "Longest anyone's gone without" and I was expecting a very different discussion. I think Neil could have won that one.
  17. Bob_Church

    EPs: Look up before pulling reserve?

    I know the one hand on each handle is a good method because that's what Gene Taylor teaches. But since I was taught differently I stick to the one handle at a time method. And any novices reading this need to remember to go with what their instructors teach them and practice it over and over again on the ground. And then some more. Get it burnt into your muscle memory to the point that if your brain locks up your hands will just go ahead and do it for you.
  18. Bob_Church

    EPs: Look up before pulling reserve?

    There's also the very real possibility of starting something that then burns up more time than you're aware of. Especially if you're looking up. On most jumps you've just had 60 to 70 seconds to play but now you could count the number of spare seconds on one hand.
  19. Bob_Church

    EPs: Look up before pulling reserve?

    I know I'm getting into heresy here but I've always pulled my cutaway then went to my reserve. I've never done the one hand on each handle thing and I've never understood any advantage to it but plenty of disadvantages. But then I've never looked at a handle. I took Pat Works' advice and practiced until I knew where they were. On my fourth malfunction I'm convinced I'd have bounced if I hadn't broken two rules. One, never cut away a total. But I did and when the reserve launched the main released. It wrapped around the reserve but the risers were disconnected to they just sort of wound that way too and were tossed aside. It left some pretty good burns on the reserve but I was ok. The second was looking at the handles. I was going through a grand and head down terminal. If I'd had to tear my eyes off the ground to find my handles I'd have gone in. No two ways about it. As it was while my mind was being overloaded at the sight of treetops flying away from each other my hands pulled my R2s then the reserve.
  20. Bob_Church

    Hello friends! SoCal newbie here!

    Welcome to The Sport.
  21. Bob_Church

    Dealing with high shock loading

    My first square had it. It was the opposite of a slider. Complicated, a pain to set up and seldom worked. Oh, and it tended to damage the canopy. Sometimes it would open so hard it pressed my risers into the side of my face. The only thing that saved me was that this canopy was such a worthless piece of shit that it usually took over a thousand feet of blue green blue green to finally open. That, basically, was its reefer system. The thing that made it a little hard to believe you should switch to the slider was looking at all these complex things that weren't working very well then being told that this little simple to use thing would. But it did.
  22. Bob_Church

    Dealing with high shock loading

    Deja Vu all over again. When I started the slider wasn't quite universal yet but it shortly took over since it worked so well. It not only worked well but was easier to use. It was beautiful. And for 40 years or so now it's been doing its job. At least until recently. Some of the equipment seems to have finally evolved past the slider. What I'm hoping is that Bill Booth or some of the other gear Einsteins are working on a replacement. Not a modified slider but a whole new piece of technology. And no, I don't have a clue what it would look like or how it would function. But that won't matter. I'll buy one when they release them.
  23. Bob_Church

    Best of the 1980s Nationals

    I was only able to tolerate her for another couple of years. Edit: guess which one. Hint, yes, that was her normal expression, constantly building anger.
  24. Bob_Church

    What was your safest parachute?

    My guess would be in the 80's, when the 'higher' performance 7-cells were the norm. Ravens, Cruiselites, Comets, Pegasus', those sorts of canopies. When you could skydive and base jump with the same gear. I kind of liken that era to the muscle car era of the 60's and 70's. They didn't go as fast or handle as well as what you can get today, but they were badass and we had a lot of fun with them. What are the smaller, very high performance canopies being jumped today like for distance? My Cruiselite would get me back from anywhere and I often suspect that my current canopy, a 210 Hornet, is just a knockoff of the Cruiselite but built with ZP. I love being able to fly around and check places out under canopy even after opening at normal 2k. When Chesapeake was open and the winds out of the East I'd open a little high, maybe 3k, over the airport/dz in Chesapeake Oh, fly across the river to Huntington Wv, which is beautiful from the sky, then back.