dpreguy

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Everything posted by dpreguy

  1. ..knots are "crunchy"...??? Not getting this one.
  2. A Rapide is not a "Slink". Slink is a trademarked product of Performance Designs. A combo of the two words: soft links. Yes, as sparky said, Rapides are available at Paragear and the strengths of each are listed on the page.
  3. I made one that goes onto your left wrist. (All fabric; "soft" if you will) It has been used several times. When released the ashes form a spherical ball shape which is highly visible to watchers on the ground. Can be used over and over. I don't make them for sale, but can send you the pattern, etc. PM me and give me a mailing address. I don't do uploading stuff.
  4. Is there a source for the old movie "The Skydivers" WITHOUT THE WISECRACKING JERKS making stupid comments? Black and white movie uh...60's or so
  5. I doubt they post that stuff on their website for the curiosity seeker. I have packed the Paraphernalias and Butlers in my shop, and have seen and touched the Rigging Innovation Aviator at PIA. Similarities in designs. Brakes for opening and limited toggle travel are addressed in all three.
  6. If you did outfit a pilot with a modern ram air, and the [pilot has never jumped anything; would you allow it to have a standard skydiver brake release system and full range toggles? Or, would you install some kind of limited travel/half brake toggle system now used in Parapernalia, Rigging Innovation and Butlers?
  7. It is pretty clear that the decision to send, or not send a "post 2016" unit in won't have to be made until 2020. Kinda rushing it to put it as a poll question now?
  8. Wow, those were some fast openings for non-quick opening band canopies! I have never seen a 24 foot belly parachute without the QOB's. The one's I've seen were military paratrooper surplus. Al were so equipped.
  9. PEP rounds we see every day lack some of the features of military rounds: Quick opening bands, elastic vent collars, anti inversion nets, slider, etc. The 24 foot belly reserves you mentioned ( I presume) had quick opening bands. Butler has the break cord ties around the apex lines and at the lower end of the lines to keep the lower lateral band even (compensating for a lack of an anti inversion net. ) The pilot rounds we see are pretty old school, except for the diapers. I would imagine that a ram air would (on average) have a quicker opening time because the rounds in common use lack the quick opening bands and vent collars. Once they are open, they are (in my opinion) probably a safer bet for the 'untrained first time under a parachute' users, but the ram air folks are certainly disputing this. I'm not really taking a firm position on ramair vs round except for the joy ride passenger. Even so, the old school rounds we pack all the time might consider the features the military has been using for years to enhance quicker openings and prevent mals. There is a tradeoff of course. There always is. A quicker opening puts more strain on the canopy and the pilot and anti inversion nets add a packing difficulty. Butler's slider gizmos obviate the necessity of an anti inversion net.... and so on... Is simpler better? Good fodder for discussion.
  10. Although it it's embarrassing, I just remembered that all 3 of the mfg's canopies don't have releaseable brakes. So, my concern of one toggle being released, and then let go is something that is taken care of. It doesn't cause a problem as they do not release in the first place. They are just set at about 1/2 brakes and if let go they will fly straight. Nice. As what's his name already said.
  11. PG chapman I think I can answer one of your queries: The setups I have seen limit the toggle pulls to the extent that the mfgs say the canopies cannot be stalled. It is a simple type IV square weave piece sewed across the riser, coupled with the same square weave toggle which only allows limited range. I haven't seen my 4 customers' rigs yet this year yet, so I am going on memory. As I mentioned, none have an Aviator. Paraphernalias and Butlers. They are beautiful rigs and are owned by "heads up" pilots. I doubt they would have any problems. I'm just not sure they are for everyone. I could change my mind with more info. Until then I'm not comfortable with fun passengers using them. Pilots - maybe some, but not all.
  12. "if they never grab the brakes". hmmnnn... Why wouldn't they grab the brakes? I'm betting someone would. Why wouldn't they do that? It's a bright yellow handle. And, the worst case scenario of all: Releasing one brake and then getting scared and doing nothing. I have counseled my pilots and trained them in my loft to never release one brake, and THEN look for the other. Although I doubt that any of the three non sport jumpers still remember what I told them 5 or 6 years ago. I am not opposed to some pilots having ram airs. Just can't believe that most are ready. Just because they are pilots doesn't mean they wouldn't make every mistake available. What comes natural to us, isn't the least bit natural or intuitive to a first jump experience, pilot or not. Never would I put a ram air on a passenger going up for a fun ride. Of those who would grab a brake; I think some would probably release just one side and then screw themselves in to the ground. Even with the detented brakes on the ones I have seen, I think the turns would just get worse. If they were open high - being in a 'one side released' turn for a thousand feet could have a bad ending. I think at PIA I heard one mfg said such a turn wouldn't accelerate. Not sure I buy that. My opinion: Never for a fun ride passenger. (Yes I do recommend a static line - you know, the line connected to the R/C handle for them) Pilots? OK, only if they are heads up and will listen to training.
  13. Rigger Rob and jumps a lot. Do you recommend a ram air parachute setup for a passenger on a fun ride?
  14. I only have Softie and Butler owners. None of my customers have an Aviator. As I recall, the canopies in them aren't 290's. One has a ( I think) a Performance Designs 235 or so and the other one uses the Precision of about the same square footage.
  15. I have a lot of pilots with rounds, and 4 regular customers who use ram air canopies in their PEP rigs. One had 3 or 4 ram air jumps "20" years ago . The other 3 are not; nor ever were sport jumpers. I don't recommend ram airs for non skydivers simply because the mfg's and the pilot who hears about them and believe they will have safer landings with one assume they will know the wind direction when they land. A downwind landing on a ram air is (in my opinion) is measureably less safe than on a round, and in the final feet of flight, I doubt that a person without some ram air jumps would be able to avoid the temptation to turn sharply near the ground to avoid an obstacle. = hook turn, or even a "fast turn". I know that all of the ram airs set up in pilot emergency parachutes have limited toggle travel which prevent a stall and prevent severe hook turns. Yes I get that. But... So, unless the pilot is a skydiver - assume he could land downwind, and probably will. Also, does anyone believe that a pilot will figure out to make a final approach from 300 feet without any significant turns? And even worse, consider a turn in one direction at 200 or so feet, quickly followed by a turn in the other direction? OK, most landings would be OK. Maybe even stand ups if the pilot knows the ground wind direction and doesn't have to avoid any obstacles. Take these two assumptions away and you have a downwind landing, and possibly add a panic turn under 200 feet or 100 feet. Worst scenario is downwind with a turn one way followed by a turn the other direction under 200 feet or 100 feet.
  16. OK I'll figure out a way to post it. And Nah. I don't pack the old GQ's anymore either. Most of them are over 30 years old....no toggles...etc etc
  17. Chapman and Baumchen. You guys are both right. I too make the decision of whether a rig is airworthy; and I feel that the FAA letter allows me to do that with those rigs where the manual sold with the rig didn't specify. I just don't feel an obligation to respect the chickenshit attempts to make it retroactive. If it does specify, then I'll follow that for the service life for those rigs. Repeating my point: I'd like the mfg.s to end the controversy by issuing a service bulletin. But, as you said, "not in my lifetime". (Considering my age that may not be such a long period of time. Ouch) Chapman. I'll see if I can get someone to post a copy of my GQ 350 manual with the 15 years service life statement. I am not computer agile enough to do it by myself.
  18. Jerry, I don't have internet at the loft, (just a pathetic cell phone there requiring big finger texting) so I am home again accessing DZ.com. I also haven't reviewed the FAA letter recently, but I believe you are correct. Certification, although I would give them a bye if they put it in their manual at the time of sale. Even so, I would prefer the mfg's end the drama and do one of two things: Shut up about trying to impose a 20 year service life retroactively, or issue a service bulletin saying their rigs are not airworthy after whatever time period they choose. A feckless bunch of knaves. walt
  19. PC Chapman and linestretch: I have an original GQ Security 350 manual. Not a photocopy. It states 15 years. And regardless if it is British manual or a US manual, it does state clearly what the service life is. The FAA letter states that (paraphrasing) if the mfg hasn't put a service life in the manual when it was sold, then the rigger may use discretion on it's being packed. Implicit in the statement in that letter, is the validation of a service life of a parachute sold with the manufacturer's manual stating that service life. The service life or what ever term was used in the manual is 15 years. I am not at my loft to quote the term, but it is not a qualified statement (based on condition or something like that). It is a direct statement of the 'end of life' for the GQ 350. 15 years. Packing it after is your legal risk. Para phernalia has now published a 20 year in their manuals. In my opinion, it is now a valid service life for those assemblies sold after that manual was published; but not applicable to those assemblies sold before. For those sold before, use the FAA letter. My opinion. My further opinion; (for those rigs sold before their manuals stated a service life), is that there wouldn't even be a controversy if the mfg's would issue a service bulletin (as stated in the FAA letter) saying that their rigs are not airworthy after a certain number of years. Instead, they issue weasel worded vague statements they hope will be accepted as retroactive. What a gutless approach. We riggers in the field are now in the unenviable position to try to explain the nuances of the conflict between the applicability of the attempts of manufacturers' to retroactively impose their 20 year positions and the FAA letter. I sometimes challenge customers to call the mfg to get their position, but so far no one has opted to do so. When the topic is brought up at PIA meetings there is a deafening silence from the mfgs.. A manufacturer's service bulletin would be the definitive option, but don't hold your breath.
  20. 1. Consider the Singer 188K. The same machine Rags Raganti uses when h demos for PIA Seminars. Smoothest machine for light to medium work I have ever used. 2. Highly consider scrapping the clutch motor and replacing it with an electronic one.
  21. fca summary is correct. And; with half of the lines in the diaper 'choice #2' - tight rubber bands on the diaper lines=per Strong. For a while they even recommended a double wrap on them.
  22. You have kinda described a flat pack. Good advice. I'll try it.
  23. I could be incorrect on this but...it is my understanding that no manufacturer other than Jump Shack makes their own ripcords. Yes it is on a Mirage rig, but I don't think it is a "Mirage" ripcord. Same on *every other rig but jump shack. I think Capewell mfg's most others. And they make great ripcords. If this one is defective then they or Mirage should promptly replace it. (Not to be "captain obvious" but not on UPT products with an RSL or Skyhook because they don't use a single pin ripcord) Not that it makes the ripcord OK or anything, but if it was OK when inspected, then the cable end popped out, then it's not on Mirage, and yes they should replace it. So, if they do replace it then the beginning of this thread is a "single occurrence" event. My experience with Mirage has been great. I have ordered parts, etc and gotten them promptly. They have a great product.