LiveLifeGoJump

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Everything posted by LiveLifeGoJump

  1. Be careful, you could drown yourself practicing for the state rowing team then that would spoil your future in both. How do you get to rowing practice, by car? what if you have a crash? you'd be safer using the bus (unless it crashes or another passenger attacks you). Probably best walking (not much chance of being ran over or mugged is there!!!). Always eat home cooked meals in case you get food poisoning(make sure it is properly cooked, employ a food taster) . If you make it to the team don't go out to celerbrate (there could be trouble at the pub/club). The point of this??? There are risks in everything we do but we still have to do the majority of them. When you are jumping there is a limit to the number of others in the air at the same time as you (aircraft capacity). Your skydiving risks are 'jumper/equipment mess up x jumpers on lift [4-24?). Your driving risks are 'dirver/vehicle mess up x vehicles you pass on way to rowing club [1-1,000?). Where is your bigest risk? You will have to decide which is the important to you but there is no reason why you should give up either as long as you know the risks & put safty first. Be safe in whatever you decide & good luck in the selections. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  2. The chances are that it IS your legs causing the turn. On my RAPS freefall dives I was turning, I could stop them with arm input but that meant that I was putting so much 'left turn input' I was unable to turn turn left & to turn right I just had to cancel my arm input (any right input spun me). I had instructors follow me out as well as video men record my dive 4-5 times before the problem was spotted. They all said my arch was ok. I was on the last of the video dives (camera man flew up,down & around me recording me from all angles) that it was noticed the my right knee was ONE INCH lower that my left. Additional ground training was given with attention given to the legs (checking distance from both knees to the ground to make sure they were equal) to build up correct muscle memory. Next jump NO TURN. I had to twist shoulders 30-40 degrees to get enough arm input just to counter the 1 inch knee drop. On the dive remember BIG SMILE, RELAX & ENJOY IT, you'll be amazed just how much easier the arch will be and how much better the dive will go. The moment you tense up to correct the turn the harder it will be to stop it. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  3. It wasn't me (Thread started by Fudd), I was too poor even to buy the silicon!!! I would NOT spray anything on to a canopy. I wouldn't even wash the container in case that caused a problem. Jumping the clapped out PD190 was a means to an end, Sabre 170 on order, only alternative was a club Fury or Sabre 210 (harness to big). Since I stopped jumping the PD190 it's never seen the light of day (it was on loan, owner wouldn't sell as that would imply it was jumpable). Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  4. I had the use of a well used PD190, in fact it was well past it's sellby date with a large slit in the slider and pro-packed with the nose pulled right out of the tail and 1 wery loose fold in the tail above & below the exposed nose. Flaring was just a practice manouver as it did nothing. PLF's were the order of the day. Your canopy sounds good in comparison. Best way to fix it is with plastic (no I don't mean stick plastic on it, I m,ean stick a new one on plactic [Visa or Mastercard etc.). There are always jumpers who will pay you to pack for them & packing the centre's kit will help. I bought a new Sabre that way. I was once told by a CCI/DZ owner that if he had so much as broke a fingernail jumping it was time to give up because the sport is not worth hurting yourself for. Can you afford to kill yourself? Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  5. Mine IS a Sabre 1 170sqft. and more often than not opened with a dive 90 right (ends cells closed but appeared to be the equal both sides). This has stopped (different container with smaller PC) and now on heading & without the bad end cell closure previously noted. In my case it was not due to body position and I do not believe the container caused the problem. I believe that the snatch caused by a large PC is the most likely culprit. Openings were never too hard but were harder than they should have been. I had allways assumed that it was my packing of my Sabre (no probs packing other ZP canopies including tamdems) and that has not improved either (still puts the fear of God into onlookers). Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  6. But the above doesn't explain why they are now on heading instead of diving 90 right. Any Ideas? Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  7. If packing is to blame for hard openings the I going to REALLY TRASH pack mine from now on. Most of my better openings have been on bad packs and vice versa. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  8. I know this thread is about Sabre 2 but this may be of some help. I have a Sabre (1) 170 and until recently experienced less than perfect openings, it would dive 90 right on opening (not HARD but harder than I would have liked, never hurt on opening). Tried all sorts of tweaks packing but to no avail. Then 2 months age I transfered to a different container with a smaller pilot chute (it IS the correct one for the container). Openings are now softer (yet still take approx the same time as before) and are on heading. Feels like a completely different canopy (my pack job is just as bad as before). Could this be the cause for Sabre 1 and/or Sabre 2 opening problems? It may be worth mentioning the size of the PC in your posts to see if theory holds water or not. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  9. What's a matter with them, can't they fly straight? It's one soloution as is a crosswind run in. How about considering a diagonal (straight) run in. Will have to take various factor, such as wind direction & DZ size/shape, into account. Again, no 'one size fits all' answer but with all this information each DZ suould be able to create a (or a number of) 'tailor made' solution(s) to suit their situations. Stay Safe, have fun. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  10. Don't be. your instructors will have jumped & dispatched many times at your DZ. They know the canopy you are jumping, the typical wind conditions that exsist at your DZ, your deployment height etc. etc. and will have extimated your exit point accordinley. There SHOULD be no reason why you can't get back to the DZ safely (although this cannot be guaranteed). So trust yor instructors abilities (and your own). Remember the radio is an additional aid, your instructor would not let you jump if he felt you did not retain enough of your training to fly & land your canopy safely. One of our s/l students hit his head on the step (C182) on exit, lost his helmet & radio and had to rely totally on retained information. He landed exactly where he was supposed to & flared at correct height. Students often rely to much on radios and will only do what they are told. Some of them have flown into obstructions (trees, fences etc.) becase they were not told to turn L or R (radio not understood, working or were lost from view of 'talkdown'. Talk & listen to your instructors, these are the best guys to give you advise. CanuckInUSA is correct when he says Better you land off in a BIG OPEN area than taking a 'downwinder' into a hazzard in a tight corner of the DZ, just to 'get back' Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  11. Thanks for that. It's something you may not realise can happen under canopy, but it can. It makes every (split)second count with this type of mal. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  12. Does he not go down with the plane (like the captain does with his ship)? Should he not stay in and try to save the plane so it can be fixed ready for the next lift> The 'jump order question' thread discusses the order issue along with reasons why, Zep sets the same order as the majority do. Why would DZ deviate from this? Unless a DZ will allow unlimited go arounds so that spots are not excessivly deep due to long exit intervals then the safest order for use with short interval would be the most cost effective for the DZ without compromising safety for the jumpers. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  13. GLOC? Not heard of that before, what does it mean. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  14. Words don't matter, actions do. I was taught to PUNCH (instructor asked us to imagine the devil grabbing our legs and we were punching him in the face to make him leave go) the cut away & PULL the reserve. I alway remember the Greek student who, after the deployment count, checked his 'can of peas'. Again the instructor didn't bother about correcting the words, just made sure the action was correct. Moral of this: Don't die while decieding whether to pull, punch or push, JUST DO IT. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  15. I tried this, it worked for me. Log off Dropzone.com & close browser Delete ALL Dropzone cookies Load browser & log into Dropzone.com I did check to make sure the the e-mail notification was turned on (both before & after the above procedure) but not sure if it was necessary. Only takes a minute so worth doing just in case. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  16. I have a Sabre 170 & for the first 100 jumps I found that the best way to pack it was to take it home & leave it on the armchair in the front room for a hour or so the pack it on the carpet, the carpet helped stop the canopy from slipping all over the place.. Apart from the earache (wife not happy about having to sit on the floor, [it was HER chair]) I had no probs. If I packed at the DZ it was just a case of getting as much in as possible the first time then force any spare bit where I could get them. I jumped on the principle that if it realy didn't want to go in then it would come out as soon as it got the chance (most of the better openongs were on the DZ trash packs). I found that it was a lot slippier & harder to pack when the weather was cold. Not sure if others would agree on this. Bagging my canopy because a source of merriement at my local DZ (it keeped the others amused while they waited for the next lift). Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  17. Anyone got a link to FCI (Flight Concept Int.), the manufactures of the Manta 280 student canopy? Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  18. Just proves, what works for one may not work for everybody. I had to put quite a lot of shoulder/arm input to counter my slow right turn which meant it was almost imposible for me to add more to turn left. My 'sod the turn just relax and enjoy' attitude stopped the turn and proved it must be my legs as my arm were in the normal position. A hardwood door could arch better that I did on my early freefalls but thanks to the more experienced jumpers at my local DZ I got the right advise to help me (and some that didn't but thanks anyway). Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  19. It is claimed the more skydivers are killed under full canopies than under mals (low turns taking the majority). A fact of life is that low turns increase the risk of death or serious injury manyfold, therefore more emphasis should be put on how to avoid the need to turn low. In the basic training (basic meaning all you need to know to perform your intended skydive safely, at least as safe as posible) the instructor will teach you what to do when thing go correctly & what to do if things go wrong. As you progress in the sport you will be given additional instruction to improve your skills and build up your knowledge. To give you all this training on day one would, in most cases, be a waste of time as quite a few students can't remember which is there left hand (some can't even remember their name till they are back on the ground). Were you taught emergency stops, skid control, 'heel/toe' (footbrake/throttle control), handbrake turns etc. on your first driving lession? I doubt it! Your instructor would have given you the basics at first then added more as you progressed. He probably not have even taught heel/toe or handbrake turns, both of which can be of use in certain emergency situations. Just as turns, tracks, track turns etc. are taught in stages as you progress through your basic training, teaching front & rear riser turns, flat turns, riser flares, what pulling on both front or both rear risers do etc. etc. is usually done in stages as you build up your canopy skills. Low turns are normally made in order to build up speed for swoop landings. Only on a low number of occasions are they done as an avoidance manouver. Learning how to turn low safely IS imporatant and everyone should, but surely they should learn how to avoid the NEED to turn low first. I was taught to pick a large open area so if I overshot or landed short of my target I would still be clear of hazzards. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  20. I had a turning problem (like spining but not as fast, it felt fast to me) on my RAPS freefall jumps. I could stop it with a counter turn but this meant I had less control over intentional turns (cause turned out to be left knee dropped slightly). I was advised to just forget about stopping the turn & RELAX MORE, hard for ME to do but when I did the turn stopped and I was locked on heading. The point is, if you are spinning/turning then your body position is wrong, don't counter the spin/turn, CORRECT THE CAUSE which is often a dropped knee so relaxing & arching usually works. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  21. Could have been any of us writing your post. I came through the RAPS system, Never saw a thing until the canopy was open until my 15th static line jump (NO aircraft ,NO sky & NO ground). There was only me, a dummy pull (which I didn't get) and a big DE-arch. As they say, every jump you walk away from is a good one. IT DOES get easier as the adrenalin rush decreases & you become more aware of what's going on. Hang in there, stay safe & enjoy. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  22. Have to agree with you on this point. It helped me sitting at home in a darkened room thinking my way throught the jump from start to finish. To Nerd137 Look around you when climbing to altitude and you will see very experienced jumpers with their eyes closed going throught the dive, move by move. And these are the guys who are good. Watch, listen & ask, you learn a lot that way. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  23. Well you learn something new every day! The only way we learn is by asking more experienced skydivers like yourself. Thank for the reply. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  24. So -3C per 1000 ft would be about right & your figure was in F. Thanks for the confirmation. I now understand the theory of the trermals close to the ground (more than I did), There would be a rush of air into the void if the bubble breaks it's surface tention in the explosive manner you mention. Didn't pick up that at first. Food for thought isn't it? Still it would pay not to get in the way of these thermals, (at least you would see the bus coming) at altitude you have a chance to recover but low to the ground would be an even more scary moment. I knew about thermals from tarmac, roads, buildings etc. but not about the 'surface tention' theory. Hope this thread helps others to be more aware of the dangers. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.
  25. Intresting reading. You quote -5.5 per thousand, is that F? I was told -3C per 1000. No mention of temperature inversions (where it is warmer at altitude than at ground level). We often check with our pilots to find out what the temperature is but this is mainly to see how many extra sweaters we need to wear. Most DZ have a grass landing area greater than a football field, but do have hazzards (runway, hanger etc.) which can cause termals and/or wind turbulance and are normally considered when picking the landing area. you say if the bubble of air rises at 1,400 ft per min there must be air somewhere going down at the same speed. I'm no expert but wouldn't the effect be similar to a bus driving along an open road where the front deflects the airwhich rushes past the sides of the bus then curls round the back creating a small pocket (slipstream effect). The air disturbance is fairly localised and reduces rapidly (someone standing on the near kerb could almost be sucked onto the road whereas on the far kerb they would only feel a slight breeze [normal width 2 lane road). I am not belittling your post, just suggesting that the effects of the bubble are more localised then your post implies. There is also 'wind shear' to consider but this tend to occur at a height that does not cause concerns coming into land (scary when it gets you whatever the altitude). In my experience, turbulance is a greater risk the thermals on landing but then I do jump in the UK, on a good day the 'hard lads' jump in tee shirts. Thank for the info. Get out, Land on a green bit. If you get the pull somewhere in between it would help.