MajorDad

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Everything posted by MajorDad

  1. Seems to be a job requirement based on the last two..... (sigh) Major Dad CSPA D-579
  2. Jason comes out of the library once in a while to skydive (or judging from the dates of the papers he has written - to do some more "research"). Last saw him at LP in 2005 or so (they tend to blur together....) Blue ones Major Dad CSPA D-579
  3. http://www.dropzone.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?post=2712145;#2712145 I watched the video yesterday, personally I remember mine very well. I watched the video of the other guy today (http://www.skydivingmovies.com/ver2/pafiledb.php?action=guestpass&id=a652x) and it was very telling as to the problem people have when they downsize too quicky and dont listen. The other jumper was jumping a Sabre 2 150 and induced his own malfunction by improper toggle inputs and ended up cutting away. From his description of the incident it was obvious that he did not fully appreciate his own contribution to the line twists. Most of the serious injuries and fatalities under perfectly inflated canopies are the turns too close to the ground (i.e. winds not level for landing). If you dont know how to fly a pattern or know how to land in an area without consistently overshooting or undershooting you will one day find yourself turning to avoid obstacles. I've known people who died because they couldn't. Downsizing like you are talking about is a real bad idea. Dont die Skydiving. Regards, Major Dad CSPA D-579
  4. http://www.skydivingmovies.com/ver2/pafiledb.php?action=guestpass&id=a652x Hopefully all the junior jumpers who wonder why the "old timers" normally give advice against downsizing too quickly watch the video and then read this thread from the start. This was a self induced malfunction below the hard-deck caused by poor canopy flying. If it was on a Stiletto, the OP would have been in a world of hurt if he lived. However it was Sabre 2 and he got away with it. Seen a lot of Junior Jumper Wonders come and go over the years and have grounded a few too when they just wouldn't listen. Nice of the OP to post a video proving the point so quickly after this thread started. As was pointed out awhile ago, most of the juniors will get the hint and take the advice. To the OP...... don't die skydiving. Blue ones, Major Dad CSPA D-579
  5. Also copied from CSPA Chat from this morning, an open email to Tim Grech - CSPA Pres ------------------------------------------------ Tim, Some of the specifics in NPA should be no problem. There have been a number of questions on the “Wind Drift Indicator Procedure” in the draft. However in PIM 1 this is addressed as a traditional WDI (which outside of competition I haven’t seen in over 10 years) or as a rate 1 turn. This section also falls in the Tech Recommendations section of PIM 1 for which there is an allowance for waivers from CSPA (I.e. if you want to include GPS in the WDI Procedure for your DZ, submit to CSPA for approval and you are off to the races). I am not a lawyer but I have a fair amount of experience with legislation through my years in the military and the construction industry. Reading the NPA preamble and hearing from some people involved in the edges of the discussion over the last while, it seems the intent is pretty clear – to protect the innocent newbie who has just arrived at a DZ for training (be it first jumps or tandem). They want to know who is running the show and who’s program you are following. And they want you to follow the program you are supposed to be following. Is this a bad thing? Stepping into the real world, there are lots of “Quality Control Systems” such as the ISO-9000 series etc. The basic principle to a quality system is that you “Say what you do” and “Do what you say”. For consistency and control, the key is to have appropriate documentation in the forms of manuals, checklists, forms and reports to support the system. Continuous improvement is from assessing your system and determining what changes need to be made to improve the end product. I have been trying to figure out how NPA will doom skydiving in Canada From a Quality Point of view, the Key Documents for CSPA are the PIMs. The aim of NPA involves PIM 1 (it also touches on PIM 2A but the teeth is in PIM 1). Reading PIM 1 last night in conjunction with NPA, I kept asking “So What?”. How will this doom skydiving? There are allowances in the PIMs for Dropzones to get exemptions for the Tech Recommendations for their specific situation (physical layout for obstacles for example). Or in the case of the Wind Drift Indicator Procedure, expand it to include GPS in addition to the WDI or Rate 1). Again stepping into the real world, when I have an audit done on a construction site against the safety program, I am ensuring that the documentation and observations are in compliance with the Company Safety Manual (which is driven by legislation and industry. Deviations from the program are identified, a Corrective Action Plan is developed and implemented, and a follow up is done. All part of the drill. If I have a site that scores low (in my world that is below 95%) alarm bells ring and we have a hard look at the site and the supervision and the support in place cause there is a systemic problem which if not corrected will lead to accidents. (again “say what you do” and “do what you say”). The company I work for is very profitable. So getting back to the NPA, it seems appears that Drop Zone Owners who are running training operations under the CSPA umbrella will have to know PIM 1 and follow it. Again how will this doom skydiving? CSPA as an organization can not enforce the implementation of PIM 1 on any Drop Zone. TC knows that. If CSPA takes the position that “We can’t enforce our PIM 1 and we don’t want you to either”, that strikes me as being a pretty weak case which destroys the credibility of CSPA as the National Governing Body for the sport. That can easily be interpreted that the PIMS are nothing more than pretty manuals for the bookshelf and are not meant to be used. For those who haven’t done so in a while, have a read of PIM 1 (on the CSPA Website). Notwithstanding the minor gigs in the NPA, I would like the CSPA executive to explain why CSPA Dropzones following PIM 1 would destroy Skydiving in Canada. This Chicken Little Approach is wearing thin. Regards Phil “Major Dad” Perry D-579 Future Former President Alberta Sport Parachuting Association Major Dad CSPA D-579
  6. When I saw the heading I figured you had dropped a couple of Flats of Beer unloading the car... That would have been a shame. However sounds like you need a couple of flats of beer to calm down Did Karen prepare your bike for you this morning? Take Care Major Dad CSPA D-579
  7. Cheers Dave, To repeat what I said above "The kit lens is intended to be an economical lens (i.e. $100) which is certainly better than a Powershot lens. This gives the new to Digital SRL user an introductory lens while they figure out what they want in a lens and what type of photography they want to do. If all you want is a general purpose lightweight lens for a Digital Rebel, it's good enough." Full Stop. There is a difference in performance between the 18-55 kit lens and the 10-22 lens which is to be expected which becomes more apparent in less than ideal lighting conditions. You cant expect the $100 lens to do perform the same way the $650 lens does (I know price isnt everything, but there is no question the 10-22 is a higher quality/higher performance lens). By the same token the Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM which costs $1000 also outperforms the kit lens. Lens is a personal choice and certainly not everyone is going to buy a $1000 lens let alone use it for skydiving. (And to be clear, I am not a videographer - I am just a serious amateur photographer) The main reason why my kit lens is on the shelf and no longer used is that I have found and am using other lenses which do a far better job. But once again, "If all you want is a general purpose lightweight lens for a Digital Rebel, it's good enough. Fair enough? Regards Major Dad CSPA D-579
  8. B&H is a great place to get stuff (About 30% discount on what I would pay in Canada even after shipping and customs). They also have user reviews on each lens. This site also has a number of reviews on lenses http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/reviews/best_canon_eos_lenses.html This Gallery has the sections sorted by the Canon Lens that took them - great for seeing if the lens you are thinking of buying will do what you what it to do http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=141406 Enjoy Major Dad CSPA D-579
  9. I totally disagree. What is it about that lens that YOU don't like? I agree on the 10-22 though. I'll probably get that or something similar this year. But not because I don't like the 18-55, more just for a wider angle. Dave I was refering to the Kit Lens. Maybe "Junk" is overstating it (mine has been on the shelf for so long) . The kit lens is intended to be an economical lens (i.e. $100) which is certainly better than a Powershot lens. This gives the new to Digital SRL user an introductory lens while they figure out what they want in a lens and what type of photography they want to do. If all you want is a general purpose lightweight lens for a Digital Rebel, it's good enough. However I liken it to a student parachute. Fun for the first couple of jumps till you realize what a dog it is. And just like canopies, there is a wide selection of lenses out there that allow for awesome picture taking. One of my lenses is a Canon EF 28-135 mm IS for general purpose use which does a far better job than the original kit lens. I also have my eye on a Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L as it will do a better job of the shorter range than my EF 28-135. That is part of the fun with DSLR's is that you can get the lens that will support your interest, be it air-to-air, macro, sports, wildlife, etc. My first choice (or second or third) would not be the Kit Lens though Enjoy Major Dad CSPA D-579
  10. I just got the EF-S 10-22mm Lens and agree that it is very nice. Worth the investment in a quality lens. dont bother with the 18-55 - it is junk. Enjoy the XTi. It is a fun camera. Major Dad CSPA D-579
  11. From the 2007 Holiday Boogie. Major Dad CSPA D-579
  12. Pie!!! Congrats on your 100th Major Dad CSPA D-579
  13. Oh that's a bunch of B.S. if I ever heard any!! Either you've got the folks at your D.Z. really intimidated or you've got some really good black-mail material on them... like pics of them fu*kin' goats or what not... or both... If the folks at your D.Z. had any hair on their collective asses... you'd have been pied into oblivion and still be leakin' pie for every orifice! 500th is most certainly pie-able. Must be blackmail photos. (or is not asking the RIGHT people on her Drop Zone) Congrats on your first 500!! Now get some pie Major Dad CSPA D-579
  14. Full points to CWO Andy Morris from the CF School of Search and Rescue for working with CSPA over the years (especially with guys like Derek Orr from the Coaching Working Committee among others) He recognized that the Forces could not provide the Center of Excellence training required for the SARTECHs. What was required by the military for the Airborne and Pathfinders was not what the SARTECHS required so he approched CSPA a number of years ago. Not sure what the JTF guys are doing since they started up just as I left the military. He also comes down to Lost Prairie to do fun jumps This is, however, and example that while meaning well, the recommendations of the coroner's inquiry may not always be well thought out or have the desired result. Major Dad CSPA D-579
  15. The SAR Tech School has actually gone to the extent of joining CSPA and using CSPA courses to train their people. However their mission is to train for and conduct Search and Rescues, not train civilians. The Canadian Military is a small organization that is stretched aready with the current operational tempo. As an institution it would not want nor accept the mission of being the mandatory agency for the training of civilians in a recreational sport. Obviously the coroner never asked them before making it a recommendation at the inquest. Major Dad CSPA D-579
  16. How much do you want???? Come up to Canada and pick up as much as you want Come on April!!!!!!! Major Dad CSPA D-579
  17. I know. The sarcasm was intended (its been a weird day!) Major Dad CSPA D-579
  18. The ground looks REAL CLOSE at 600' when you are not under a parachute, dont it Major Dad CSPA D-579
  19. Don't you put the new people in the suicide position? They learn faster that way not to cut the corner!! Major Dad CSPA D-579
  20. I have had my XTi for over a year now and love it. It is also worth it to invest in good quality lenses to go with it. Enjoy whichever way you go!! Major Dad CSPA D-579
  21. From cspa.chat earlier today.. ......................................................................... It is with a heavy heart that I am forwarding this message. I have just learned about the passing of CSPA’s long loved Cathy Johnson. Funeral arrangements have been made for Saturday, Feb. 16th between 11:00 – 2:00 p.m. in Ottawa at Hulse Playfair & McGarry Funeral Home 1200 Ogilvie Road Ottawa, Ontario. We will always remember Cathy in our hearts…….. judy .................................................................... Eternal Blue Skies, Cathy Major Dad CSPA D-579
  22. Let's see..... Lost Prairie 2006 Jump 1413. Nice Mad John 15 way. Sniveler then Spinnetto. Spinnetto which became very Ground Hungry with good G's Very hard to cut away. Very, Very, Very Hard to cut away. The "32" of the runway I was over was getting closer and closer. Used the Mark I Eyeball and Chest Mount Altimeter throughout to check altitude and do the "math" on the situation. Finally got rid of the main and got the reserve out. Rear riser turn into the windline, released brakes and flared. Checked the Pro-Track on the ground ...... "400 Feet" (The download later showed 385 Feet plus a pretty funky curve below 2000') Beat the Cypress but it did fire during the reserve deployment (didn't cut the loop). Although I knew what altitude I was at when I finally got rid of the main, I knew it was going to be close. What was going through my head at 1000 feet under the Spinnetto was that firing the reserve at the rate I was spinning would probably lead to a bad day if I was still attached to the main. Although I walked away from my decisions without a scratch, I was 2 seconds away from major trauma or death. However it wasn't my time yet. The Quad Fours from the Poker Game the night before won enough to cover the repack and new cutter. (Thanks Rich, Kathy and a few others!!!) Major Dad CSPA D-579
  23. And also tell us what the Chief and/or Senior Instructors at your Home DZ have to say about you under a Sabre 2. Some junior jumpers are fine under it with their training/aptitude/experience. Others are future members of the "Heavy Metal" Club. Major Dad CSPA D-579
  24. me Wow - You like - Tinkerbelled yourself. Wild Fantasies are running through Turle's head right now. He'll be back after a relaxing smoke Major Dad CSPA D-579
  25. In Canada there have been on average 2 or 3 fatalities a year since the early 90's and we have had at least one year without a fatality. However every fatality causes a media feeding frenzy. The internet has also helped the media as they mine sites such as Dropzone.com and the various chat groups. "If it bleeds, it leads" - this will never change. Major Dad CSPA D-579