Calvin19

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Everything posted by Calvin19

  1. Calvin19

    rig weight

    Nope. It flies OK but It collapses very easily. Needs a ton of work. I suspected they would collapse easily. On the other hand, how quickly does it recover, since there are no cells to reinflate? Very fast recovery/re-inflation. Fast enough to where I considered landing it jump #1. Zero heading change(most important thing by far).
  2. Calvin19

    rig weight

    Nope. It flies OK but It collapses very easily. Needs a ton of work.
  3. Calvin19

    rig weight

    Truth. That is why using the terms "mass" and "weight" as completely separate concepts is important.
  4. Calvin19

    rig weight

    I worked on single surface BASE canopies for two years ('13-'14) for a company in Boulder. Test jumping and all. Fun stuff. We paused the project, needs a LOT more time. I know there are a couple other companies that worked on these, I talked a couple times with them and shared ideas. My first test jump on it was a Direct-bag slider up from a 182. It sniveled open and flew right off the bat. My words 3 seconds after the slider came down and it was flying stable were "you're fucking kidding me". It's a different animal. But we made it fly. -SPACE-
  5. Calvin19

    rig weight

    Continuing on that tangent, paragliders also have an appreciable amount of inertial mass in the form of air in the cells. This is VERY noticeable when you fly different gliders, especially as some single-surface gliders have hit the market. There are no ram-air cells, so the wing itself loses a couple kg. This may not seem like it matters but controlling the AOA of the glider is extremely important and an experienced pilot who had never flown a SS glider before will be very surprised at how fast the wing surges/dives and responds to brake input. With more than half the mass of the wing gone, it has no inertia. Fun stuff.
  6. Calvin19

    rig weight

    Huh? The OP has one of those questions that can be effectively answered in a single sentence? Science trolling. Hmmm. Ok. Here we go. Standard 747 takeoff. treadmill facing backwards(no factor) (x) pigeons flapping in the Y vector, creating airflow inside the cabin that exerts a force equal to the mass of the pigeons. (no factor, but it will vary over time for the individual accelerations of the pigeons made by their flapping) helium balloons decreasing the inertial mass of the aircraft. Answer:nothing Science answer: It depends on the mass of the helium in the balloons. The inertial mass and weight of the aircraft does not change if the pigeons are flying under their own power inside the cabin. As the aircraft accelerates down the runway and the buoyancy-assisted pigeons start to fly inside the cabin, the aircraft will move forward as the birds, no longer being kept in place on the treadmill, will drift towards the back of the cabin (assuming they are not compensating for their visible environment). The helium balloons will exert a force on the pigeons in the vertical AND forward directions due to the buoyancy of the lifting gas and the new pressure/density gradient lines inside the accelerating aircraft. If the buoyancy force from the balloons is equal to the mass of the bird, it would be neutrally buoyant and would stay in place. A helium balloon that is positively buoyant has to be about 20cm diameter. If you packed the 747 with as many pigeon balloon aircraft that would fit, it would be pretty heavy. But none of them could fly if there was no space left. Even if they could it would not change the problem. Just be sure you tie down the treadmills: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIjO0sKBDDw
  7. Calvin19

    rig weight

    So exactly how much of a lard ass are you? I always kinda wondered what fabric and stitch weight really added to wing loading, because the wing IS the fabric and stitches. I can see lines and risers maybe, but it seems that true wing loading would be weight w/o fabric and stitches. "wing loading" would include the entire aircraft mass, so yes it all is included. If we get really scientific about the physics of any aircraft in flight including a parachute, the total mass of the aircraft(parachute) being accelerated(maneuvering) would be included. This means the air inside the cells of the canopy is included. For stable, unaccelerated flight, buoyancy negates this air but it is still a part of the aircraft's inertial mass. The loading on the airfoil would even change (while maneuvering) if you have a full breath or air in your lungs or have let all the air out of your lungs. Of course we don't care about these things because the mass of the air inside the inflated canopy is probably less than 1% of our exit weight. Think of a 747, empty of all cargo but with fuel tanks full. It has to accelerate down the runway to takeoff, but even though it is empty of all cargo it still has ambient air (air is heavy) in all the voids within the aircraft not occupied by hardware. That is a lot of air. Cabin/cargo area alone is about 1000kg worth of air that has to be accelerated. Including all voids probably another 500kg. The aircraft displaces that volume + the volume of the non-air material structure and fuel, cargo, passengers, etc. All of this must be accelerated down the runway and in any maneuver that aircraft makes.
  8. Calvin19

    rig weight

    That's a big freaking cat. I thought my Dlynx was fat. -SPACE-
  9. I only occasionally watched it when it originally ran. Then when I first subscribed to Netflix in the early 2000's, I watched the entire series from beginning to end. Same. Awesome show. -SPACE-
  10. More enlightenment on rocket guidance systems: mypages.iit.edu/~kallend/rocketsci.wav That. Was. Awesome. hahahahahaha. I got through that first listen, slowly building up a laugh at the exact precision of ambiguity it gives you. Funny, that is seemingly "identical" to how our multi-rotor flight computer/controllers work through INS, GPS and compass. It's a somewhat good descriptor to a lot of automated navigation systems I'm sure.
  11. Also sounds a lot like the Titan 2 start cartridge spinning up the turbo pumps to initiate engine start. sadly I don't have clean audio of this to make a cool ringtone. This video explains the phenomenon, but not in great detail. Nothing wrong with watching Amy talk about rockets of course. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTJDI4bwtOM
  12. I was doing a demo in Oregon and there was a string of Vipers practicing over the venue during down time. I kept hearing this wicked loud grind/spool up noise as they throttled up while passing overhead at about 1000'. I called my good viper pilot friend right off and asked him what that noise was. He said he does not know, he can't hear anything from the cockpit as he is being a god among men in his own F-16. I hung up on him. Dick. A few months before he had given me his (now replaced with the secret version) flight manual for the C models. He texted I should look in there. My thought was it could be the compressor wheel spooling up from low RPMs before the turbine and fan catches up and burner kicks on. Nope. Turns out it is the actuators for the stator vanes changing pitch to adjust for the optimum airflow ahead of the compressor. It sounds like happiness and awesome in the purest forms. Enjoy.
  13. Flight Management Computer with a pong game easter egg. Nothing but awesome. For those that do not know, a FMC is the brains of an aircraft, if it had any. Pilots input different performance, comms, nav, etc. info and the FMC spits out useful data and useful controls for motors and stuff. Turns out they have entertainment uses too. https://www.facebook.com/flightorg/videos/10153306387148640/
  14. Longboarding is extra burly. The extent of my skating is riding the motorized/electric mountainboard towing other (real) longboarders back up hills in Boulder. It will do 25mph with me on it towing two guys my size (160b) uphill. LiPos are amazing.
  15. Naturally. I suppose someone who would need this medication might not know that. Yet.
  16. My cat is staying at my moms house for a while (I sold my house, so we are homeless) and I made a key for myself. The pink key is for my hangar. I'm like a 16yo girl.
  17. Serios google news photo assignment fail. Or win. Better's choice.
  18. http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2015/08/strange-saga-of-the-mh370-plane-part.html Interesting. I read several articles from different news reports, and all but one reiterate (correctly) that the investigators never said 'we will know if this piece came from MH370 or not through a thorough study of the part'. Of course they might eventually be fairly certain, though it will take time and creative methodology to determine. This illustrates (again) the general differences between armchair researchers and an experienced unbiased investigation.
  19. I am a member of crewseekers and have made a few inquiries in the last year or two. Of course I would prefer our 'own' boat on 'our' schedule, but crewing vs leading make little difference to me as long as the dynamics are good between crew members. I get along pretty easy with almost anyone, but I hate being in the middle of squabbles between other people if I have to bunk with them. That said, I will talk to my friend about doing this instead for a winter until he/we are both more ready to go it alone. If we can find connecting legs to crew that would be ideal. Part/half of the appeal of sailing is not knowing where you will end up and that would be the case with that plan. Side note- I just got back from Hawaii on a drone job filming/studying the corral reef bleaching events. I met a few scientists who work/have worked with WHOI and the Alvin DSRV. I think I would rather work on the RV Atlantis (Alvin's support ship) than sail. I can't be a commercial pilot, but I could theoretically be an Alvin pilot, eventually. Dream job #3.
  20. http://www.veteranstoday.com/2015/08/25/confirmation-tianjin-was-nuked/ hahahahahahaha [inhale] ah hahahahahaha.. hehe. [wipe tear].. sniffle.. disclaimer: I'm a couch critic. I am not a nuclear scientist, chemist, or explosive expert. That said, I know enough about scientific investigations, identifying logical fallacies, nuclear weapons, and explosive engineering to still be laughing at how much work some guy at "veterans today" put into trying to scare ignorant people. That was a shitty thing to happen to a lot of people. I commend the teams who tried to stop the fires and who rescued all the people caught up in this. I reserve the right to laugh hysterically at the stupid people trying to make it worse than it was.
  21. That is a valid point, but I should offer a little more about my friend. Him and I (and his GF) have talked about the 'him being required to hold his bit' if we do anything longer than a full daylight leg. He is an (extremely) active commercial pilot and understands responsibility. Probably better than I do. I know his GF(of a few years) too and I can confidently say she will be fine with it, probably insist on it. If this was not him or one of my other very close friends (that I trust and have trusted many times with my life) I would not have agreed to this short cruise or talked at length about seriously buying a boat. Not that it matters much, but there are 4 couples + me There is bound to be at least one pair in a fight. This is a good idea that I mentioned to him. Plan is not nearly as good, but I told him we should get at least a check out on the boat(for both our sakes) beforehand. We are going out on it with a skipper from the charter company for a half-day the day before everyone else gets there. Him, his friend(one of the other guys) and me are getting in 3 days early to get provisions and do this short introduction and will all be there. Also, not that it matters much, but the boat is a 46, not 48. I too don't think I could single hand it. I want the guy who can to teach me how to sail a cat. This is all good advice. I would want months of close-shore sailing with the boat and with him/a crew before going huge. Wouldn't go out of sight of land without being confident in a crews ability to get it and them home without me.
  22. This guy has no sailing experience? He was on a big diving cat for a week in Central America, but as a guest passenger. As crew, no. Maybe some inland sailing. No cabin boats or overnights. I explained to him that buying one that is not brand new (Of course I said i'm not opposed to that as long as he pays for 95% of a half million dollar boat) would take months to shake down and fit (the boat and him/us). He will have his first taste in November, but it won't be real open ocean, just predictable Bahamas. If he has any discomfort there I can just buy myself a 40' cutter with electric everything. Or wait. That would be great! thank you! I had a '79 40' Cutter-rigged sloop made by Yorktown. Center cockpit. I liked the visibility and the huge master. What is your reasoning?