Calvin19

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Everything posted by Calvin19

  1. There were several excellent clips of ejection seat parachutes and their pyros to assist in deployment.
  2. I was just trying to be funny. And I agree. Any nuclear exchange would be bad news.
  3. I can't tell if that comment is a nod to the tin foil hat people or a patriotic battle cry.
  4. If you liked this, recommended is "Infinity Chamber", 2017. DAMN good.
  5. Lets pretend this isn't Dimension C137 and they are correct. If it is a NASA conspiracy, I'm fine with living out my life in this epic fantasy of rockets and exploration.
  6. They are not that advanced. And there is a portion of them merely trolling, but its hard to keep up that farce. My guess is 75% of people joining the 'flat earth' groups only do so for the LULz and to laugh at idiocracy(I did), and that 95-99.9% of the media-creating promoters of it believe they are preaching scripture. It's a thrill in 'debate', an illusion of 'knowing' something others don't, fabricating their victimization and projecting it on others while feeling vengeful toward a fabricated boogieman is what gets these people high. They are truly fascinating and an excellent case study in crowd psychology. This is true for everything from the vaxxers, hoaxers, truthers to flat earthers and any conspiracy theory touting idiot privileged enough to have one. It's REALLY easy to win a debate with idiots. Walk away.
  7. Wow! And he owned it. Good pilot. Thanks for that share. Risk an ejection or essentially defect to civilian shipping company. Tough one.
  8. This is for sure the takeaway from an event like this. It's for sure stupidity, malice could be an included contributing factor.
  9. I'm baffled by the 'just give up' attitude they displayed. They're on a functional sail boat. Bobbing around for 5 weeks because a spreader got damaged makes no sense to me. I can think of half a dozen ways to get under SOME sail without even trying. Open ocean sailing needs skill, preparation and determination. These girls were way out of their league. And I disagree with you about the EPIRB. Total loss of steerage and power is a no shit emergency. I'd trigger it. Drift into a big storm or a shipping lane and it's game over... Agree that they were in over their head. Agreed that open ocean sailing requires honed skill and a mental steadiness that they did not appear to have. Also agreed that the 'give up' attitude that they conveyed after 'rescue' was concerning. I did not look too far into what 'stranded' their boat, but I'll revisit the statement that they were in over their head. Sailing is not rocket science. Assuming your sailboat can maintain buoyancy without constant manual bailing any reasonable sailor should be able to make their boat move in the general direction they want it to go. Even with a mast broken in half I am confident I or any skilled operator could make 1/2 VMG to anywhere in the Pacific given FIVE MONTHS. I'm not defending the women in the sense that I would EVER want either of them on a boat with me, I'm defending their reasoning in not pushing the EPIRB. All i'm saying is that they are really, really, REALLY bad at sailing or figuring shit out. Granted, none of us were there. The only relay of the damage to their boat and their experience must me seen through the filter of emotional 'victims' in shock from their failed voyage. If you look at what vessels have been able to navigate across open oceans safely, I cannot see any reason why their sailboat drifted for months in ambiguous directions. Hell, I can sail a canoe upwind with a space blanket and some properly placed paddles as keel and rudder. Give me or any competent sail driver a keeled hull, functioning tiller and only minimal rigging and you will have a steerable, sailable vessel in less than a days work. Granted without a full sail you will be slow and inefficient, but thats the nature of sailing. Also keep in mind that being in the open ocean like that you have literally NOTHING to do but keep food and water stores available and ALL DAY AND NIGHT LONG TO RIG THE BOAT TO SAIL WHERE YOU WANT IT TO GO. I've done 300 mile open ocean sailing legs with a known inoperable engine and a destroyed main sail. You just figure it out and go. Had the boaters pushed their button, I doubt any news would come from it. they would have been rescued and maybe towed. End of story. But I do respect their resilience by NOT pressing it for the reasons they gave.
  10. I did see that. Fun stuff! What I gathered was no substantial danger to environment, they were merely able to detect these trace contaminates.
  11. I've been on some multi-week sailing trips, never as far out as they were but I have some points to make that I think are well informed. 1-They did have a emergency sat beacon. They decided, consciously, not to use it in their circumstance because they were not in immediate danger. They had food stores and a functioning desalinator. I respect their decision, their reasons for it and would have done the same under the same conditions. You're not going to hit you SPOT device for a sprained ankle. If they were within a week of running out of food I'm sure they would have used it. 2-They're exaggerating in the heat of the moment. If there was not a premeditated plan for a book deal or just a morning show appearance I still give them a pass. No other human contact for months can make a person do stupid things.
  12. Took my dosimeter (radiation measurement tool, pretty much a computerized geiger counter) on an airline flight with me to highlight the ionizing radiation received while on an airline flight. I have yet to bring a dosimeter up on a skydive, but my assumption is that the dose rate at 18,000' would be under 1uSv/hr. N America standard background at surface: .05-.15 uSv/hr At 30,000' measured inside B737: 3.05-3.55 uSv/hr Walking around the exterior of reactor 4 Chernobyl, Ukraine: 2.5uSv/hr Just thought people might be curious about that. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BwfP_FpalBc&feature=youtu.be
  13. What I do instead of sleep. Calcite, Quartz, Caliche, Manganese, Fluorite. Self collected, Socorro, NM. Abandoned mine. Fluoresced using UVA/B/C
  14. Friend's father's rock shop in La Veta, Colorado. He snagged a few dozen 70 million year old fossil bone and soft tissue fragments from a dig in Utah. Significant radioactive output (for surface rock) @ ~70,000 CPM, ~3.7mSv/hr. Also fluorescent, showing uranyl inclusions and an unidentified deep-fluorecent red. (deep meaning input of 256nm, output ~700nm)
  15. Lockout is an interesting phenomenon. technically speaking Lockout occurs when the aerodynamic lift and applied (kite line) force line up and remove any inherent stability of the system. (The lifting forces on the kite/towed aircraft are in line with the kite line/tow line). At this point weight shift control is drowned in the high forces of the line/kite system, and aerodynamic control (canopy steering lines,etc) are greatly decreased in effectiveness. In a paraglider, parasail, parachute, or hang glider or other single-line 'kite' ground tow this is avoided by limiting the force on the tow line throughout the flight. Obviously it works very well. However, in the case of winch-tow sailplane launches the aircraft is not stabilized in pitch by the tow line, almost all pitching (AOA) is controlled souly by the pilot, allowing for relatively high tow line forces while maintaining full control of the kite/tow line system. The high line load is closer to in-line with the lift force of the wing, but not an issue because of the pitch authority the aircraft has. When I mentioned "assuming you have pitch control" I mean the ability of the wing suit pilot to have very high authority on lifting forces, (being able to dump lift by drastically changing the shape of the wing, etc). In kite surfing, kites that have a different kite-line system to allow for drastic changes in the lifting vector of the kite. Forces on the kite lines are limited by the mass of the pilot, as the pilot is not an anchor but an inertial mass. Me and the late Alex G spent a summer getting "good" at towing 220-260 square foot BASE canopies behind a car. using a 2000' 550pound test nylon line the only load limiter was the stretch(>30%) and final absolute -strength- of the line, and it did save us a few times. From what I have read of other people doing this the consistent problem i saw was using a static rope as the tow line with a release mechanism that required action (as opposed to inaction like our release system uses). In a lockout on a static line,(almost) the only thing that can save you is usually releasing from the line, so having to reach for a handle when the system is highly loaded(handles out of reach, in the wrong place, or overloaded/deformed into an un-releaseable state causes inevitable uncontrolled contact with the ground or obstacle. We used this system to do countless flights up to ~1200' with no injuries and the only 'close calls' were from the line failing or voluntary release at a low altitude near-lockout state where the pilot would not have the altitude to make a turn, has to land near straight-ahead. Please note that the car tow on a static line is physically identical to high-wind anchoring of a kite. This is an interesting academic discussion. I hope everyone reading this appreciates the insanity needed to attempt fixed-line towing/kiting without proper understanding and equipment.
  16. Yes, it is possible. Wingsuit testing has been/is being done in horizontal wind tunnels, loosely the same idea. Haven't seen it done on a single 'kite-line' yet. Or with any appreciable maneuvering. Serious problems to consider- 1-100mph wind is a lot. It will probably be gusty and variable direction. 2-You will need a lot of training, planning, testing, previously undeveloped equipment(probably even a custom suit), procedures, and technique, and then practice. No doubt all of this will be expensive and probably worth it in itself. 3-You have to fly a wing suit anchored to the ground. You (the kite) have to create enough lift to overcome your mass AND all the drag in the system that relates to the kite line angle and lift vector. And remember that increase in lift also increases drag. Assuming you have control of your pitch axis(vector of lift as it relates to the kite line) and with a 0 degree angle (kite/you directly downwind and level with your anchor) best case you need to create about 130% the lift of your normal free-flight wing suiting. The lift needed to overcome this drag increases exponentially and to infinite as the kite approaches 90 degrees overhead. 4-Assuming this works, you have to get down without dying. And I hope opening a parachute is not very high on the options list 5-Still have to live through the hurricane.
  17. Why? unusual high risk of post-relationship grudges, rumors, and intimate secrets filtering into happy places and circles. Tried it once without this happening, but the risk is real. Not saying I avoid it like the plague, just tread very lightly.
  18. I avoid dating skydiving women generally, and by no fault of their own. But I did not notice a difference. One question you should ask yourself is do you think YOU are better in bed than whuffo guys?
  19. LSA does not automatically equal experimental. LSA just means light sport (1320 pounds or less (1430 for amphibious), slow stall speed, max cruise speed). But you can have an LSA certified under several different ways S-LSA A factory built, E-LSA an experimental built by someone else, or just under standard experimental. Each has benefits and drawbacks... For example you can legally rent out an S-LSA, but not an E-LSA or Experimental (unless you have an LOA from the FAA allowing it). I don't know a bunch about E-LSA, but Experimental has the Operations letter. So it might actually be legal to jump an S-LSA with no issue. Mine is experimental and the OL letter clearly says it can't be jumped. As for your experience... It might have been an S-LSA and that would make it legal. They might have made sure the OL letter didn't ban jumping. Or they might have just done it illegally. I have a commercial license, so I will not be doing anything illegally.... I know a wet blanket. Besides, if anyone was going to jump my plane... It would be ME and who would be flying my plane? Of course, my bad. Aircraft I mentioned was an E-LSA. And i'll fly your plane if you want to jump out of it! I only have a few water landings in float planes, but I'm confident I can pull it off after a few landings with you As a pilot and a skydiver I always squirm a bit when talking to non-pilot skydivers about airplanes. Literally their ONLY thought process when discussing an airplane goes irreversibly to "how can I jump out of it". Generally, flying any aircraft I get more satisfaction from sitting up front and flying the thing compared to riding in the back and falling out. Edit-fixing magnet letter refrigerator spelling[url]
  20. TLDR: FAA says no, not worth the trouble to get them to say yes. Experimental aircraft have a set of operational limitations that they have to abide by and every experimental aircraft OL letter I have seen bars jumping and banner towing. I have had three, now four experimental aircraft and they all banned "Parachute operations." So while the plane would actually be pretty easy to exit, the FAA would frown on it.... And I have a commercial certificate and...Yeah, not gonna happen illegally. To make it legal, I'd have to contact the FSDO (now just FSO) and petition for a new set of operational limitations and answer bunch of stupid questions from people that don't understand skydiving at all and in the end most likely still be told no because, "I wanna" is not going to be seen as a good enough reason. Not encouraging the practice, but on several occasions (more than 10 years ago) we used an E-LSA to do 'demos'. NOTAMs were filed with aircraft registration, and radio comms were maintained. Nothing came of it. edit-changing LSA to E-LSA
  21. Calvin19

    2017 Eclipse

    I have never seen a totality firsthand and do not deny it to be an amazing moment that I would love to see someday. Some laziness and a sever case of FOMO counterintuitively kept me in Colorado. That said, I agree with you. A girl I am courting used the excuse "but I can see 94% eclipse from my apartment! why drive 24hrs round trip!?" Huh, well, it's the difference between "just the tip, just to see how it feels" and whatever inevitably comes right after that.
  22. Calvin19

    2017 Eclipse

    It's worlds better than what DOT was warning, but heart still goes out to anyone traveling away from the totality line!